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Philipp Seymour Hoffman Found Dead

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I agree. I worked with recovering addicts for 16 years............theirs is a constant battle that they must fight each and every day. It is an illness that some don't understand. The majority of addicts suffer from what is called a "dual diagnosis"............some type of mental illness plus the addiction. In most cases, it's a lot more complicated than just making poor choices. I'll leave it at that; this thread is about paying tribute to Mr. Hoffman and his stellar body of work...............................

 

Edited by: Geminigirl on Feb 3, 2014 10:41 AM

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TikiSoo wrote:

<< The very definition of the word DOPE. >>

 

Thinking back to the 1967 Blue Boy episode of "Dragnet".

 

Dr3.jpg

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I will never understand people shooting up. I can see drinking, smoking, pills. Doesnt involve pain to get there. Shooting up, is not something I could ever do. (Bad enough I have to endure blood draws).

 

I guess that film he did for Sidney Lumet (forget the title now) must have been easy for him to act. Sad.

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Yes. I knew Devil was in the title. I thought of that film right away after hearing the news. Creepy.

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StBartsActor and Geminigirl,

 

You are correct that it's difficult for some people to understand addiction.

 

Anyone who's ever loved an addict though can attest that addiction is, as Geminigirl pointed out, usually not just a case of making bad choices.

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As a former addict, I can attest to that. But even with that fact, I had a hard time understanding the OD thing. While using, the idea of OD-ing scared me serious. It's probably one of the many factors that got me off the stuff. But until then, I NEVER had the "Oh, it'll never happen to ME" attitude.

 

Of course, none of my addictions involved the use of needles. So there must be something different in that mind set.

 

Doesn't make Hoffman's death less tragic though. Just more senseless.

 

Sepiatone

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Highly respected among his peers but I doubt if the general public knew who Mr. Hoffman was and would have a hard time naming his films even as a character actor in "Hunger Games".His starring roles like "Capote" and "Magnolia" did not set box office records. Seen by so few. And as for his character roles he looked like so many other character players.Beloved by his fellow actors. Not so by the masses.

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> Not so by the masses.

 

Actually, I think he was. Everyone I know likes him - in every movie they see him in.

 

Maybe you're thinking "the masses" are just those who keep Jennifer Aniston and Will Ferrell at the top of the marquee. Real people over 30 pay a lot more attention to the many fine character actors - they just tend to watch them at home rather than suffer the cost and increasing irritation of 'box office'.

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Amid the comments and opinions on the tragic passing of Mr. Hoffman- in this thread and elsewhere on the internets- I have noticed a risible note of- well, let's call it something less than sympathy- in some people's reactions.

 

Also, yes?- a bit of anger- even disgust. (It's your right, btw...in America and Canada and parts of Europe at least.)

 

I know a lot of that anger comes when someone dies from substance abuse and I- like pretty much everyone else in the friggin' world- have been exposed to substance abuse and I know anger is a natural reaction to it.

 

But I don't think I can- or want- to get into that whole angle of the story any better than GeminiGirl did in her earlier post below.

 

(I will take a- possibly unnecessary- aside to note that other reasons for the harshness of some replies include: people's self-loathing and/or white knuckling under addiction issues of their own, along with a natural antipathy towards a guy who was kinda schlubby, rumpled, and unshaven, and had a penchant for "kicky" scarves that could send someone's Pretension-o-Meter into the reds.

 

The only new thing I can bring to the table in this discussion is my view that:*The need to be an artist is in all of us. The courage to take that art to a BIG LEVEL (ie- HOLLYWOOD) just plain entails knowing that a real risk of a measurable loss of dignity, privacy, safety, peace of mind, and happiness comes with the process.*

 

(I also add that lurking 'neath the bridge to glory, is an infinite cadre of haters and critics and garlic-hearted trolls like me who -SORRY- just plain preferred the guy in "Infamous" and tacky as it is- will bring it up even now.)

 

I'm not saying I approve of this- mind you- I'm just saying it's what it is.

 

And as part of that loss of safety, of self, of peace of mind, and all sorts of other things I can't think of right now- comes a neurotic insecurity and sense of unease, even a hunger for tranquility- that- duh- would drive damn near anyone to mind-altering substances.

 

I can certainly understand and- more importantly- I sympathize. And I think of it every time someone in the limelight dies young.

 

So, bottom line: I don't think he would've been a happy man if he hadn't taken his act to the next level- it was his path. And hats off to him- no matter what you think of the nature of his passing or his offbeat persona or tendency to "take it to a ten" ACTING!-wise- because, you know, he was balls-in about it and he took his bit a hell of a lot further than most of us ever will (a working actor being something of a rarity.)

 

"It's all in the game, and the way you play it. And you've got to play the game you know"- from "Born in a Trunk" sung by Judy Garland- who knew a thing or two about it- in "A Star is Born."

 

Showbiz was Mr. Hoffman's game. That he took an early bow from it in no way negates the fact that he gave it his all, had guts, worked hard, and played it to all the way to the majors.

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Not to belabour the subject of addiction, but I have a friend who has battled crack for about 20 years. She also has multiple mental health issues, including having a borderline personality and being manic depressive (she's been in several mental health institutions in which they played medications guinea pig games with her, only making her condition worse).

 

She also made reference to the addiction voice within her, almost like a demonic being, she called it, whispering to her whenever she has doubts or insecurities. She's been clean for the better part of a year now. It's not just one day at a time for her but, sometimes, one hour at a time, or, when things are really bad, even five minutes at a time.

 

One thing that has helped her to a degree is to be in an area or city in which she doesn't readily know where drugs can be found. It has helped her get through rough periods. Of course, if she's really intent on getting the crack, nothing will stop her but the more awkward it is for her to find it, the more time she has to reconsider on starting up again.

 

Addicts go through a torture, particularly if compounded with the complications of mental health issues, that we who never had such an issue can't really begin to understand, I feel.

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I don't feel much sympathy for Hoffman himself but I feel a great deal of sympathy for his family, extended family, friends (any that did not help get him high), peers, and fans. Hoffman died stupidly. He was a great talent that stupidly killed himself and caused a lot of grief to those who knew and loved him. You live by the sword (heroin) you will most probably die by the sword (heroin). He murdered himself most stupidly. He played a stupid game of "Russian Roulette" with a serious dangerous drug and payed the ultimate penalty.

 

Edited by: roverrocks on Feb 5, 2014 6:36 PM

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>Addicts go through a torture, particularly if compounded with the complications of mental health issues, that we who never had such an issue can't really begin to understand, I feel.

 

True Tom, but I have to ask why you prefaced your comment about the torture addicts(and alcoholics, for that matter) go through with that comment about mental health issues, such as your earlier reference about "doubts and insecurities"?

 

And I ask this because as far I've ever observed, those very "issues" are the primary reason almost all addicts and alcoholics "self-medicate"!

 

(...'cause it sure isn't because they hold a high opinion of themselves deep down inside, is IT?!)

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I guess we're in agreement, Dargo, since addiction and mental health issues so often go together.

 

Yes, addicts are playing "Russian roulette," as roverrocks said, (and they know it, too, at least after they get through the denial process and realize they do have a problem). However, addiction and mental health issues are all part of the same package but I think it's the latter which is the most important one to address first.

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It should also be noted that people like Hoffman had the means to seek treatment. This isn't always the case. It is my understanding that his friends and family have been pushing him in that direction for years.

 

At the end of the day we are responsible for ourselves. Sorry folks if that comes off harsh but it is just a reality of life.

 

He will be missed since I have felt for years that he was one of the best actors of his generation.

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>At the end of the day we are responsible for ourselves.

 

You make it sound so simple, James. For some people, who can have emotional issues extending back to their childhood, it's not.

 

We all travel different roads. While I more than understand the frustration and anger of family and friends of addicts, I can't be quite so certain that if circumstances, in particular, mental health issues, had been different for me, that I might not have emulated the behaviour of some others. It is so easy to pass judgment. (Don't get me wrong, I'm as guilty as anyone of doing that, at times, but, on the whole, I try to keep a open minded perspective, particularly in dealing with some addicts).

 

I have no comment about Philipp Seymour Hoffman since I know next to nothing about the man.

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I am so angry over this and yes I do need to get a life

 

what does heroin feel like

 

does it feel better than having your loved ones looking up to you

 

these people these actors just have too much access thrown at them and too much time off in between gigs

 

this is the corrupt side of the business

the powers that be obviously know who is using but if the actor is bankable that is all that matters

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>At the end of the day we are responsible for ourselves.

 

>You make it sound so simple, James. For some people, who can have emotional issues extending back to their childhood, it's not.

 

Actually, it IS that simple....everything else is an excuse.

 

I'm reminded of that skit with Bob Newhart as a psychiatrist where the patient says, "But I feel badly because my father ignored me so I act out for attention."

"STOP IT!"

"And I drink/take drugs to escape the pain"

"STOP IT"

(sounds harsh I know, but it all comes down to that)

 

Jails are full of people who continually make excuses for their actions. Everyone needs to grow up and act responsibly in society, no matter what cards they are dealt. While I wholeheartedly agree those with emotional issues benefit from help and support, sympathizing and accepting excuses only perpetuates the downward spiral.

 

When someone comes to me with their handful of excuses, I bring up Tina Turner's life or more impressive Oprah Winfrey whose childhood was full of horrendous roadblocks but still rose above all adversities.

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There was a recent comic strip that started out with a guy in a psyciatrist's office. The shrink says, "So, I understand your problem seems to be the inability to accept BLAME."

 

The guy says to the shrink, "Yeah, but it's not MY fault!"

 

I contend that if you have the whereabouts to recognize the root of your problem( bad childhood, low self esteem, smothering parents etc.), then you only have the power to overcome said problem. That to keep doing what your doing even though you recognize the cause means you're just transferring the blame elsewhere.

 

But this has NOTHING to do with addiction. It's too easy for those who have never been caught up in it to believe all the cliched, simplistic dismissals like, "Trying to escape reality" or Too weak of character to handle the day-to-day responsibilities". More often than not ( and at least in MY case), addiction is akin to alcoholism. We're MORE than ready to accept THAT to be a "disease", but refuse to believe that the same personality anomaly that might lead to alcoholism is the same for drug addiction. I started out more or less in "recreational mode", choosing being stoned to being drunk. I never LIKED the feeling of being drunk. If I did, I might have been an alcoholic. But I could never stop at one joint, one hit or one line. I know many who were able to stretch a gram of coke for three or four days. It wouldn't last ME three hours. Such is the qualities of many chemical substances, one finds themselves seemingly hopelessly addicted before they know it. It has NOTHING to do with "weak character" or bad childhoods or whatever.

 

To my credit( if I'm allowed to use that term), I blamed no one else but ME for my dependency and the ensuing problems it created. In retrospect, I have no regrets; I've had my fun. But if I could go back, knowing what I now know, I'd have never started up.

 

Sepiatone

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"Each one of us here today will at one time in our lives look upon a loved one who is in need and ask the same question: We are willing to help, Lord, but what, if anything, is needed? For it is true we can seldom help those closest to us. Either we don't know what part of ourselves to give or, more often than not, the part we have to give is not wanted. And so it is those we live with and should know who elude us. But we can still love them - we can love completely without complete understanding."

 

― Norman Maclean, A River Runs Through It and Other Stories

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I never said it was simple. I don't know why when this type of topic is discuss people just make up stuff. DUH, it isn't so simple. Of course it isn't simple and that is why people die, even rich ones that have the means to get help.

 

But I stand by what I said.

 

Oh, and I may of fell into the same trap. But that is just another irrelvant point. ALSO, I'm not passing judgement. I just made a statement about how I view life. Really Tom these are all issues you need to deal with not me.

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