yogiboo

Why No Beatles Films on TCM?

603 posts in this topic

> In Fred's case, it's because he likes Lawrence Welk more.

 

I'm reminded of a scene from the movie *It's Trad, Dad* (directed by Richard Lester, who later did *A Hard Day's Night* with the Beatles). The town fathers in the backwater English town who want to ban the sort of music the teens like are destroying a bunch of records, when suddenly one of them yells out something to the effect of, "No, no! Not that one!" The camera pans down -- to a Lawrence Welk record.

 

*It's Trad Dad* is a really fun movie that knows not to take itself seriously at all.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

>Part of my problem with them is that I don't think they really "rocked".The Stones rocked. The Who rocked.

 

Oh yeah, they "rocked", finance, they "rocked" a lot. "Revolution", "Get Back", "Day Tripper", "Help", "Back in the U.S.S.R.", ":I Saw Her Standing There" among just a few. BUT, unlike The Stones who basically did a lot of Mississippi Blues based Rock and The Who doing primarily Three-Chord Power Rock, The Beatles successfully branched out to many other genres, including Rock and Roll, Hard Rock, Country, Blues, English Music Hall, Psychodelia, Instrumentals, Soul, Folk, Indian, and Symphonic.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Even when talking "psychedelia", I prefer the Byrds, C, S &N, the Doors, the Airplane, etc. Maybe it's just that everyone was so ga-ga about the Beatles that, contrarian that I am, I resisted. I DID like them, just not as much as most people.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

> Different strokes for different folks. Except for a couple songs, I think Led Zeppelin bites the big one.

 

This is why it's good there are so many choices. I liked Zeppelin, but have only two of their albums. Why? Because on each of the others, there are only two or three songs worth hearing. Not enough to invest in the entire LP. And while many of my friends went nuts over Black Sabbath, I thought they were a waste of tape. I'm that way with a lot of other genres. While I like jazz, I was never that keen, in spite of him being the "be all, end all" of the genre for many, on Miles Davis. Yet, I DO like "B!tches Brew" and "Hush/In A Silent Way". Oh, and "Kind Of Blue".

 

I like classical, but have no use for Berlioz, Smetana or Offenbach.

 

The thing to remember while we're voicing disagreement on the qualities of various rock groups, the members of those groups refused to play along. When I was in Jr. High( middle school for all you kiddies out there), There were many heated arguments about "Beatles vs. Stones", who was better, who were not, even to the point of FISTFIGHTS breaking out among the Beatle lovers and the Stones freaks. It must have been a huge disappointment for both sides to learn that THEY actually had a "mutual admiration" thing going on. And that they all got along quite well as friends over the years. Townshend, Richards, Clapton and Harrison ALL thought Jimi Hendrix would put them out of a job, when actually, when he had chance to meet any of them, Hendrix was like a tongue-tied, starstruck kid. The former had no resentment, and Jimi had nothing but respect for them. It's the FANS who act crazy. Remember, Clapton and Harrison remained the best of friends, even AFTER Clapton married Harrison's ex wife. It WAS Harrison who asked Clapton to play the solo on "While My Guitar Gently Weeps" after all.

 

It all can be summed up by a story I learned about Brahms.

 

One day, he was invited to be the guest of honor at a dinner given by a prominent count. The count was what today we would call a "Brahms freak". At dinner, the count gushed to Brahms, after pouring him a glass of wine, "This is the best vintage in my cellar. One might say it's the "Brahms of wines"!

 

Brahms took a sip, screwed up his face and said, "Better bring up your Beethoven!"

 

Sepiatone

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

>And you are so right about George Martin. He is the true "5th Beatle". He is a fascinating man; so gifted and talented.

 

"Without George Martin the world would have been a different place."

 

Ringo Starr

 

Jake in the Heartland

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Beatles were mostly rock. They would do a one off countryish number

or a bit of music hall every once in a while, but rock was their main thing.

The Stones did a number of country pastiches too. There is really

no reason not to like the Beatles, the Rolling Stones, the Who, or Led

Zeppelin, or Pink Floyd or Deep Purple all at the same time. It's all good

to me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

>I am very picky.

 

Yes, me too.

 

I don't care for Lawrence Welk at all. His music was the most boring of the old 1950s-60s late-era big-band type of music.

 

I had a 36 year old girlfriend back in the early 1990s (when I was 49) who used to love to watch the Lawrence Welk show every Sunday morning on PBS, and that just about drove me nuts. But I didn't dare say anything because I didn't want to insult her, and since she was a hot babe and much younger than me, I didn't want to insult her at all. :)

 

Anyway, my favorite music is a very odd collection of eclectic styles, such as American recorded folk and bluegrass styles from the 1920s and 30s, such as the first Jimmie Rodgers, The Carter Family, and Vernon Dalhart, and a lot of Cajun music, and some of the first few albums of Bob Dylan and Joan Baez (which contained some songs that were copied after some old 78 rpm songs). Also early Dixieland Jazz such as Saint Louis Blues (written in 1914), and Preservation Hall type Dixieland music. I used to hear it at the original Dixieland Hall in New Orleans in the mid-60s. I also like classical Mexican corridos and rancheras from the 1910s-40s, and some rare old 19th Century style Mexican music, such as La Paloma. I bought several of my albums in Mexico.

 

Also some special operas (The Barber of Saville, La Traviata, and a few others), classic rock and roll from the 1950s, mainly Chuck Berry and Little Richard, plus a narrow band of San Francisco rock from the late 1960s (such as The Grateful Dead, Jefferson Airplane, etc.) (I used to hear these bands in person in Golden Gate Park, and also at Winterland and The Fillmore (I used to talk to Bill Graham when he ran the original Fillmore). I once drove Pigpen from his home on Ashbury Street to a doctor?s appointment. I did not know at the time that he was dying from a liver disease.

 

And some other kinds of music too, such as a narrow band of country and western music from the late 1940s and early 50s, but NO modern Nashville stuff.

 

I am so delighted in my old age that all of this kind of music is available for free on YouTube now, so I don't have to buy and keep track of a lot of records and CDs.

 

Oh, and by the way, I have one of the few rare copies of the very first pressing of the original Charlie Manson album titled LIE, which I ordered from some LA hippie newspaper ad in the early 70s. Squeaky first told me about it when I visited her at the Spahn Ranch. :)

 

I'm in love with Ann Savoy.....

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b9V5Z5R97MA

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well I would say The Beatles here mostly what I call pop rock. Clearly not hard rock excect for a handfull of songs (mostly on The White Album).

 

'Rock' as a genre is a very wide one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Funny, the two songs that I came closest to putting on my ipod by the Fab4 or any of its members were "Junior's Farm" and "1984" by McCartney, who certainly had no reputation as a rocker.

 

Edited by: finance on Feb 7, 2014 5:24 PM

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well Helter Skelter was written by Paul (he plays the guitar on this one with John playing bass), and many people say this is the first heavy metal type rock song.

 

Paul was the most versatile of the lads. One can hear how music from his father's generation influenced many of his songs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Paul certainly was the most versatile. It has been stated by many, in particular "rock" critics, that John was the deep thinking rocker while Paul was the melodic, love song, balladeer. If you follow their catalog through the years it is obvious how wrong those assertions truly are. John could write some lovely melodies and softer songs ( Julia, In My Life, etc ). and Paul wrote many songs with a harder edge ( Helter Skelter, Sqt. Pepper's, I'm Down, etc) and he could also be deep and thought provoking ( Blackbird - which was written about the civil rights movement).

 

The Beatles musical journey is a fascinating one that is still being discovered by new fans every day. I am so glad I've been along for the ride since the 70's. I discovered them when I was very young through my love of Wings.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

>I discovered them when I was very young through my love of Wings.

 

I didn't have a clue the first time I saw them on the Ed Sullivan show

watching them with my family on the Ed Sullivan show on black and

white television.

 

Jake in the Heartland

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I understand that some may not enjoy the Beatles' style of music. Not everything is everyone's cup of tea. I personally am not a fan of Led Zeppelin, except for "Ramble On" and "Dancing Days." I think that's because Led Zeppelin is so over played on the radio that I'm sick of them. Them and AC/DC can take a long break as far as I'm concerned.

 

I really love the Beatles, I like their later work over their earlier work. Their early stuff, where they do a lot of covers, except for "Twist and Shout" which I love, is a little too "Doo-woppy" for me. When they start producing more socially conscious and poignant music, that's what I really love. Plus, some of their really trippy music is also amazing, even if you have no idea what they're talking about.

 

I really love "Revolution," (the faster, harder version. Not the soft version), "Happiness is a Warm Gun," "Helter Skelter," and "Blackbird." There are so many Beatles songs that I love, I'd write a whole novel on here. I'd have to say "Abbey Road" is my favorite Beatles album.

 

I'm really looking forward to the Beatles special on TV on Sunday. I hope it doesn't disappoint.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I guess so. It doesn't matter now, but back when you just had albums or

CDs only three good songs seems like a waste of money. I go in the

opposite direction and often find there are maybe one or two songs that

aren't that good, the rest are well worth it. There are lots of albums like

Who's Next where every song is good, at least to me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Today I'd call them pop rock, but back in the mid 1960s I would

just call them rock 'n' roll, even though I think some of the early

Beatles' albums, at least in the States, had that little printing at

the very top of the album File under Beatles, Pop Group or some-

thing to that effect. Hard rock came along a little bit later, but the

Beatles were doing a few similar songs earlier in their career, even

if they didn't go by the name of hard rock.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

>Hard rock came along a little bit later, but the

> Beatles were doing a few similar songs earlier in their career, even

> if they didn't go by the name of hard rock.

 

Compared to what music was popular when the Beatles "invaded," and the music that continued to be popular until the middle part of the decade, when bands like The Who, Cream, The Doors, Led Zeppelin, The Rolling Stones and Deep Purple emerged, some of the Beatles music could be considered hard rock. Even The Rolling Stones (who rose to prominence at about the same time as The Beatles), had a lot tamer music until they finally hit it big with "(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction."

 

John Lennon's rendition of "Twist and Shout" and his scream were quite harder than other music at the time. "Helter Skelter," with its screaming and heavy guitar playing, is considered one of the first metal songs. I love the end when Ringo yells "I've got blisters on my fingers!" The fast version of "Revolution" is quite heavy as is another of my favorites, "Why Don't We Do it In the Road?" "I Want You (She's So Heavy)" and "Back in the USSR" are also both very rowdy, guitar driven songs.

 

I don't think you could pigeon hole The Beatles into any particular genre. They kind of dabbled in a little bit of everything. They've got hard rock, pop rock, rockabilly, psychedelic rock and even some country. Heck, Paul McCartney (okay, not "The Beatles" per say) even sang grunge music with the surviving members of Nirvana a couple years ago. Most artists that are clearly identified with a specific genre don't always play that type of music. Metallica, a heavy metal band, has music and cover songs that are decidedly lighter.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Beatles were their own genre. The other music styles that grew up in their wake were others attempting to keep up with them as they continually evolved. While they cannot be considered as hard rock (although why that would be a drawback I cannot understand), they were certainly not pop, even when they were singing she loves you, yeah; and I wanna hold your hand. Even at their loudest, rawest, most raucous, they were not hard rock. But they were always great, great music.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As MorrisSteele very sensibly says:

>...There is really no reason not to like the Beatles, the Rolling Stones, the Who, or Led Zeppelin, or Pink Floyd or Deep Purple all at the same time. It's all good to me.

 

Quite.

 

Edited by: misswonderly on Feb 9, 2014 10:55 AM

deleted the rest of the post.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A lot of people download entire albums onto their ipods. I would never do that. Even if I "liked" every song on an album, "like" isn't good enoiugh. In order for a song to make my ipod cut, I have to love it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

New Members:

Register Here

Learn more about the new message boards:

FAQ

Having problems?

Contact Us