slaytonf

Lots of early Thirties movies on tomorrow

10 posts in this topic

I wonder what the occasion is.  Anyway, I'd like to recommend two of them.  The first, Carnival Boat, is notable only for having an early appearance of Ginger Rogers.  It's watchable.  Bill Boyd--pre Cassidy--is good as the lead male.  It has some action in it, too.  A runaway log train, and a dam blown up--or almost blown up, I don't remember.

 

Sporting Blood is much different.  It is a modest movie, tracking the story of a horse's fall and redemption--paralleling the lives of the main characters, and has a lot of conventional stuff in it.  But there are also a lot of worthwhile features, not the least of which is Harold Rosson's cinematography, most evident at the beginning of the movie--I hope they show a good print.  Rosson shot Red Dust, Red-Headed Woman, The Asphalt Jungle, The Wizard of Oz, On the Town, and the burning of Atlanta sequence in GWTW, among others.  There is a lot of good dialog, especially between Madge Evans and Clark Gable, and more especially in one really fine tracking shot which must go on for almost five minutes, unbroken.  Unique, I think for its time.  Everybody else delivers fine performances, including John Larkin, Ernest Torrence, and, oh boy, Marie Prevost, doing a turn as a spoiled rich man's wife, with her patented comic flair.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Unfortunately The Racket has already begun, since this precursor of the 1951 Robert Ryan remake  may be the best of the lot.  But there's another great Louis Wolheim performance at 11:30 in Gentleman's Fate.  Wolheim's early demise just when the sound era was dawning is one of the great tragic losses in movie history.

 

The 8:30 film, Paid, may be Joan Crawford's best (or at least rawest) early performance this side of Rain.  And where was the ACLU when she needed it?   Don't miss this movie if you can help it.

 

Finally, The Sin of Madelon Claudet (at 1:15) gives us one of Helen Hayes' more memorable roles, a tearjerker to be sure (about a mother separated from her son, who doesn't know who she is), but one played with conviction.   It's just about on the level of Gladys George's pefomance in Madame X.

 

I haven't seen War Nurse (at 10:00), but any film with Robert Montgomery and a backup cast like that has to be worth checking out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow, I know today rocks!  I'm sorry I didn't see your thread and started up another as it's also a day to honor Marie Prevost!  Love the flix, all of them rock hard!  I'm particularly looking forward to CARNIVAL BOAT as it's one I've never seen before, and it's always a pleasure to watch early Ginger!!! :wub:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Golly!  I been poached!  But thank you, markbekauf, for solving the mystery of today's theme.  I am ashamed to admit I did not catch on, as Marie Prevost is one of my favorite actresses!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey markbeckuaf, you rockin' to NBNW today? I'm so glad to see it come around again. Love that shot when Cary gets 'fake shot' and goes up on his toes (the athlete that he was) before he drops.

 

Never knew The Philadelphia Story was soooooo vedddy slow. Plus, Hepburn makes my teeth itch. Oy.

 

Rock on, mark!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Golly!  I been poached!  But thank you, markbekauf, for solving the mystery of today's theme.  I am ashamed to admit I did not catch on, as Marie Prevost is one of my favorite actresses!

No worries, and glad to be of assistance!!! I also adore Marie!!!  :wub:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Finally, The Sin of Madelon Claudet (at 1:15) gives us one of Helen Hayes' more memorable roles, a tearjerker to be sure (about a mother separated from her son, who doesn't know who she is), but one played with conviction.

 

 

_frisco jenny_ (a very great movie) contains a similar plot.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Finally, The Sin of Madelon Claudet (at 1:15) gives us one of Helen Hayes' more memorable roles, a tearjerker to be sure (about a mother separated from her son, who doesn't know who she is), but one played with conviction.

 

 

_frisco jenny_ (a very great movie) contains a similar plot.

 

 

 

Yes, it does, but it did little for me, possibly because I can't stand the sight of Ruth Chatterton, whose face reminds me of Mae West's without the saving twinkle in her eye.  I much prefer Madelon Claudet and Gladys George's version of Madame X, while realizing that it's all a matter of taste.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

mark, I found NBNW wanting and turned it off. Tell me why the bad guys sent a plane after Grant, when he was standing by the side of the road, and they could have faked a pickup and shot him, movie over?

 

I'm guessing there were lots of other holes I never saw before.

 

Guess the bloom is off NBNW.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

mark, I found NBNW wanting and turned it off. Tell me why the bad guys sent a plane after Grant, when he was standing by the side of the road, and they could have faked a pickup and shot him, movie over?

 

Right, or they could have had the pilot spray Grant with machine gun bullets, or drench him with  poison gas  while he was still out there in the open.    And why in the world would the pilot go Kamikaze on a fuel truck?  I'm sure anyone could add to this list of improbabilities.

 

But then if you can think of a single thriller that doesn't require a fair amount of suspension of belief, I'd like to know about it.   In another Hitchcock movie, Shadow of a Doubt, "Uncle Charlie" acts like a borderline paranoid psychopath from almost the moment he shows up out of nowhere at the door, and yet we're expected to believe that nobody but the audience might ever look at this weird acting fellow as anything more than a mildly eccentric prodigal relative.

 

I love NBNW for many reasons and found SOAD laughingly unbelievable, but like all such calls, it often depends on what you (the viewer) bring to the movie to begin with.  Maybe it's just that I like Cary Grant and have always thought that Joseph Cotten was kind of creepy, and if it had been a more naturally charming actor like Clark Gable or Robert Taylor in the Uncle Charlie role,  I might have suspended belief myself.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

New Members:

Register Here

Learn more about the new message boards:

FAQ

Having problems?

Contact Us