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RSVP for heartache

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Yes, that was a very sad film!  Dorothy McGuire was wonderful in her role.

 

I love the song of the movie title.   Great minor key song and unique for a 'standard' as it relates to it's chord progression.  

 

Oh,  and the movie is good but, yea,  sad.   McGuire does well but she is good at playing the ugly duckling (I don't mean that as a knock on her but she was cast in that type of role more often than any other actress of the era).

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I'm glad you mentioned the music in this movie.  I think the composer was Miklos Roscha (sp.?)  This is featured in a CD of his movie music that I have.  It contains lots of wonderful music.

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I love the song of the movie title.   Great minor key song and unique for a 'standard' as it relates to it's chord progression.  

 

Oh,  and the movie is good but, yea,  sad.   McGuire does well but she is good at playing the ugly duckling (I don't mean that as a knock on her but she was cast in that type of role more often than any other actress of the era).

I agree that McGuire tended to specialize in these kinds of parts, at least in the 40s and early 50s.

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I keep looking for INVITATION on the latest TCM schedules. It has been much too long since they played it. I doubt, however, that it will turn up during the 31 Days of Oscar tribute. Maybe in March...?

 

Incidentally, I see on the TCM database page for this film that the working title was RSVP. Interesting, since I used that phrase in the title of this thread. 

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I agree that McGuire tended to specialize in these kinds of parts, at least in the 40s and early 50s.

Wonderful actress too!  My list of the best is growing.  I loved Dorothy in Invitation and The Spiral Staircase and Enchanted Cottage.

Dorothy could portray love and humor and fear beautifully.  To that list Gentleman's Agreement is great too.  Boy, my memory of great films keeps on and on.  She is another Golden Age noteworthy actress with multiple talents.

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There are so many films in which "heartache" becomes the dominant tone of the film.

 

One of my favorites is "Rhapsody" with Elizabeth Taylor, Vittorio Gassman and John Ericson.

 

To be torn between two such charismatic men could not have been an easy experience, to say the least.

 

And both men were great talents - Vittorio Gassman played the violin and John Ericson played the piano.

 

Personally, I  couldn't have chosen between the two of them.

 

Could I have  arranged some sort of threesome arrangement?

 

Vittorio might've been agreeable, but John probably would't have.

 

Elizabeth chose Vittorio, and her "heartache" might've been only beginning.

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There are so many films in which "heartache" becomes the dominant tone of the film.

 

One of my favorites is "Rhapsody" with Elizabeth Taylor, Vittorio Gassman and John Ericson.

 

To be torn between two such charismatic men could not have been an easy experience, to say the least.

 

And both men were great talents - Vittorio Gassman played the violin and John Ericson played the piano.

 

Personally, I  couldn't have chosen between the two of them.

 

Could I have  arranged some sort of threesome arrangement?

 

Vittorio might've been agreeable, but John probably would't have..

 

Elizabeth chose Vittorio, and her "heartache" might've been only beginning.

I like how you've expanded on this topic to describe other films with a similar theme. 

 

TCM could build an evening of films focusing on heartache. Sort of give melodramas the spotlight for once.

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I like how you've expanded on this topic to describe other films with a similar theme. 

 

TCM could build an evening of films focusing on heartache. Sort of give melodramas the spotlight for once.

I couldn't agree with you more - melodramas featuring "heartache" - I'd sit through all of them.

 

One of the greatest is Douglas Sirk's "Written On The Wind".

 

It's blessed with a kind of "craziness" that makes it completely irresistible.

 

It is so full of PAIN - and you just know that, at some point, the entire film will explode.

 

Might TCM do an entire day that's devoted to Douglas  Sirk?

 

This film is full of such quotable lines.

4243481959_a098141b40_o.jpg

 

Above. Marylee and her brother, Kyle:

 

Kyle: Why are you putting your two cents in?

 

Marylee: Only because of Mitch.  Because I've never had him.  And your wife has.

 

As I said earlier, this film is full of pain, but the deepest pain could not be addressed, Douglas Sirk was hampered by the Production Code, and that would be that Kyle Hadley (Robert Stack) was actually in love with Mitch Wayne (Rock Hudson), but Douglas Sirk did his best to suggest it, anyway.

 

article01.jpg

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Great comments about WRITTEN ON THE WIND. I call it heartache WRITTEN all over. LOL The scene where Malone is on trial, if that isn't a woman's heart ripping to pieces, I don't know what the heck is. This is one of those films where I feel the leads are flat and the supporting characters are more interesting. I love Malone and Stack in this film. And they're great in THE TARNISHED ANGELS, made afterward, again with Hudson starring and Sirk directing.

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Great comments about WRITTEN ON THE WIND. I call it heartache WRITTEN all over. LOL The scene where Malone is on trial, if that isn't a woman's heart ripping to pieces, I don't know what the heck is. This is one of those films where I feel the leads are flat and the supporting characters are more interesting. I love Malone and Stack in this film. And they're great in THE TARNISHED ANGELS, made afterward again with Hudson and Sirk directing.

Thanks, and I do wish that "The Tarnished Angels" was better-known.  Rock Hudson, Dorothy Malone and Robert Stack were quite a trio.

 

By the way, that song to "Written On the Wind", sung by The Four Aces - who could forget it, right?

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Thanks, and I do wish that "The Tarnished Angels" was better-known.  Rock Hudson, Dorothy Malone and Robert Stack were quite a trio.

 

By the way, that song to "Written On the Wind", sung by The Four Aces - who could forget it, right?

I love these two films too!  I love Robert Stack and Dorothy Malone in their performances.  They really grab you emotionally.

 

That song is lovely "Written on the Wind".  Did not know it was by The Four Aces.  They had some really nice songs.

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Magnificent%2BObsession%2Bposter.jpg

 

The heartache in this famous 1954 film is unrelenting - Bob Merrick (Rock Hudson) feeling guilty for needing a respirator - a respirator that could have saved the life of the husband of Helen Phillips (Jane Wyman), then Bob inadvertently causing Jane Wyman's blindness, then, hiding himself behind an invented persona (Robby) to make Helen's days easier, then, going back to medical school and becoming a doctor, then, losing Helen who discovers who the man in her life really is and doesn't want to be a burden to him and, so, disappears, and, last but not least, Bob saving Helen on her deathbed -

 

the heartache is beyond exquisite - it very nearly wipes you out -

 

Douglas Sirk's so-called "weeepie" is perhaps the grandest soap opera that has ever reached the screen.

 

It's done with such conviction and style that its' pain lingers long after the film is over.

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Rayban, I agree with every single word you wrote about this wonderful Wyman/Hudson movie.  I never tire of watching it.  And great classical music on the soundtrack.  It's no surprise that Jane
Wyman was up for an Oscar for this.  And as for "Written on the Wind", I seem to remember that this was a big hit for the Four Aces.

 

Terrence.

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...about this wonderful Wyman/Hudson movie.  I never tire of watching it.  And great classical music on the soundtrack.  It's no surprise that Jane Wyman was up for an Oscar for this.  

Have you seen the earlier John Stahl-directed version with Irene Dunne? I think it's just as good. I'd love to see both films back-to-back one evening on TCM. A truly classic double-feature that would be.

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Rayban, I agree with every single word you wrote about this wonderful Wyman/Hudson movie.  I never tire of watching it.  And great classical music on the soundtrack.  It's no surprise that Jane

Wyman was up for an Oscar for this.  And as for "Written on the Wind", I seem to remember that this was a big hit for the Four Aces.

 

Terrence.

By the way, what do you think that "the magnificent obsession" is - the one that both Helen and Bob discover about Dr. Phillips - is it doing good for others and expecting nothing in return?

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Have you seen the earlier John Stahl-directed version with Irene Dunne? I think it's just as good. I'd love to see both films back-to-back one evening on TCM. A truly classic double-feature that would be.

Yes, both versions of  "Magnificent Obsession" should be shown back-to-back on TCM.

 

Strangely enough, Douglas Sirk said that he was unable to read the book by Lloyd C. Douglas.

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Yes, both versions of  "Magnificent Obsession" should be shown back-to-back on TCM.

 

Strangely enough, Douglas Sirk said that he was unable to read the book by Lloyd C. Douglas.

Does this mean he didn't have time to read it, or that it was so bad, he couldn't finish it..?

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Does this mean he didn't have time to read it, or that it was so bad, he couldn't finish it..?

Yes, it was so bad, in his opinion, that he could not finish reading it.

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MAKING LOVE - 1982 -

 

A young married man (Michael Ontkean) struggles to come to terms with his homosexuality.

 

Making_Love_Michael_Ontkean_Kate_Jackson

 

With the passage of time, this film can only get better and better.

 

Two exquisite performances by Michael Ontkean and, as his wife, Kate Jackson.

 

There's also a fine performance by Harry Hamlin, as Bart, the first man in Zach's life.

 

And a very endearing performance by John Calvin, who becomes Zach's partner.

 

The heartache in this film is beautifully conveyed by the two leading actors, who are walking through such alien territory.

 

"Making Love" should have made movie stars of the three leading actors.

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MAKING LOVE - 1982 -

 

A young married man (Michael Ontkean) struggles to come to terms with his homosexuality.

 

Making_Love_Michael_Ontkean_Kate_Jackson

 

With the passage of time, this film can only get better and better.

 

Two exquisite performances by Michael Ontkean and, as his wife, Kate Jackson.

 

There's also a fine performance by Harry Hamlin, as Bart, the first man in Zach's life.

 

And a very endearing performance by John Calvin, who becomes Zach's partner.

 

The heartache in this film is beautifully conveyed by the two leading actors, who are walking through such alien territory.

 

"Making Love" should have made movie stars of the three leading actors.

Agreed. The film should have catapulted them all to movie stardom. I guess it was just too risky (gutsy) for the time in which it was made, the very conservative 1980s. We should also mention that Dame Wendy Hiller has a supporting role in MAKING LOVE.

 

P.S. I remember one of the networks aired the film a year or two after it was in theatres (before the home video market exploded and cable TV became what it is now)...and there were a lot of complaints from angry viewers who felt the movie with its daring subject matter did not belong on primetime TV. 

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Agreed. The film should have catapulted them all to movie stardom. I guess it was just too risky (gutsy) for the time in which it was made, the very conservative 1980s. We should also mention that Dame Wendy Hiller has a supporting role in MAKING LOVE.

 

P.S. I remember one of the networks aired the film a year or two after it was in theatres (before the home video market exploded and cable TV became what it is now)...and there were a lot of complaints from angry viewers who felt the movie with its daring subject matter did not belong on primetime TV. 

As the years go by, "Making Love" becomes more and more pertinent.

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As the years go by, "Making Love" becomes more and more pertinent.

 

I saw this film for the first time about 2 years ago and I was very impressed by its openness and frankness.    Hey, not to beat the dead horse about Brokeback Mountain not being groundbreaking,   but comparing the two films AND the eras when they were released Making Love is a lot more groundbreaking than BM.

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I saw this film for the first time about 2 years ago and I was very impressed by its openness and frankness.    Hey, not to beat the dead horse about Brokeback Mountain not being groundbreaking,   but comparing the two films AND the eras when they were released Making Love is a lot more groundbreaking than BM.

I agree, "Making Love" was a very groundbreaking film for its' time - 1982.

 

But, because it was NOT a box-office success, its' subsequent reputation has suffered.

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