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I agree, "Making Love" was a very groundbreaking film for its' time - 1982.

 

But, because it was NOT a box-office success, its' subsequent reputation has suffered.

Yes, but other films that were not financial winners when first released have been re-examined later, ultimately becoming more elevated in status. 

 

I think the problem here is that Kate had multiple successes on television (before and after this picture). And Harry went on to make a name for himself on L.A. Law. So they are seen as TV stars as opposed to movie stars. And that plays into how people look at this motion picture, still today, which is a shame.

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Since Van Johnson's 100th birthday occurs in late August, I am thinking he will get a Summer Under the Stars day. If that happens, I hope INVITATION is selected. It hasn't aired since I created this thread.

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Since Van Johnson's 100th birthday occurs in late August, I am thinking he will get a Summer Under the Stars day. If that happens, I hope INVITATION is selected. It hasn't aired since I created this thread.

Guess what...? The schedule information was just made available this afternoon...

 

...and yes, Van Johnson is getting a day on August 25th. More importantly, INVITATION is on the schedule that particular day. :)

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Guess what...? The schedule information was just made available this afternoon...

 

...and yes, Van Johnson is getting a day on August 25th. More importantly, INVITATION is on the schedule that particular day. :)

Van Johnson starred in another "heartbreaker" - this time with Elizabeth Taylor - "The Last Time I Saw Paris."

 

the-last-time-i-saw-paris.jpg

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Van Johnson starred in another "heartbreaker" - this time with Elizabeth Taylor - "The Last Time I Saw Paris."

 

Yes, that's another great one. It's also on the schedule for August 25th. Here's the line-up:

 

August 25, 2016

THE BRIDE GOES WILD 

HIGH BARBAREE 

DUCHESS OF IDAHO

IN THE GOOD OLD SUMMERTIME 

THIRTY SECONDS OVER TOKYO 

THE LAST TIME I SAW PARIS 

SCENE OF THE CRIME 

BATTLEGROUND 

MIRACLE IN THE RAIN 

TWO GIRLS AND A SAILOR 

THE ROMANCE OF ROSY RIDGE 

INVITATION 

1in.png

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Yes, that's another great one. It's also on the schedule for August 25th. Here's the line-up:

 

August 25, 2016

THE BRIDE GOES WILD 

HIGH BARBAREE 

DUCHESS OF IDAHO

IN THE GOOD OLD SUMMERTIME 

THIRTY SECONDS OVER TOKYO 

THE LAST TIME I SAW PARIS 

SCENE OF THE CRIME 

BATTLEGROUND 

MIRACLE IN THE RAIN 

TWO GIRLS AND A SAILOR 

THE ROMANCE OF ROSY RIDGE 

INVITATION 

1in.png

I am a fervent admirer of "Miracle In The Rain".

 

I just wish that it were a better-known film.

 

Van Johnson and June Allyson were a great team.

 

They proved it, too, in the first two films on the list.

 

Van Johnson was a terrific film partner for the MGM ladies.

 

Even Lucille Bremer shone in his presence.

 

But any lady was lucky to get him.

 

Even the guys in "Battleground" were all the better for supporting him so effectively.

 

He could do it all - in any kind of genre.

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I am a fervent admirer of "Miracle In The Rain".

 

I just wish that it were a better-known film.

So do I. Surprised nobody else has mentioned it in this sub-forum. It's a well-made melodrama, with a spiritual theme, and the leads are wonderful. I believe it was based on a teleplay from an earlier live TV drama. 

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"High Barbaree" (1947) is an interesting "heartbreaker" - Van Johnson and Cameron Mitchell are shot down in their plane and, as they float in the plane's remains, Johnson tells his story to Mitchell.

 

He and the love of his life, June Allyson, grew up together and couldn't have been closer, but, when her family moved elsewhere, they lose touch with each other.

 

The scenes with Claude Jarman, Jr., who plays Johnson at a much younger age, are extraordinary.

 

Years later, when they re-connect, Allyson is shocked to learn that Johnson has not become a doctor (like his father), but has become instead a businessman who is going out with the boss' daughter.

 

Allyson has become a nurse.

 

But a tornado intervenes (?!), Johnson is forced to take care of the injured - he had two years of medical school - and suddenly realizes that Allyson was right - he should have become a doctor.

 

By this time, she has gone back home, disgusted with what she thinks that Johnson was become.

 

He thinks that she has re-married - but, just before Johnson and Mitchell took off, the "lovers" re-connect once again and she tells him that she did not re-marry.

 

By this time, Johnson and Allyson are so "re-connected" that she is able to "divine" where he is and is instrumental in his rescue (Mitchell has already died).

 

The fantasy of High Barbaree, a tale that his beloved uncle told him when he was a child, intervenes here, too, in the rescue of Johnson.

 

It's a broken romance with a supernatural element - but the director, Jack Conway, and the cast, especially Johnson and Allyson, bring it to memorable life.

 

The lesson here - true love has redemptive powers - and even fantasy can play a part.

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"High Barbaree" (1947) is an interesting "heartbreaker" - Van Johnson and Cameron Mitchell are shot down in their plane and, as they float in the plane's remains, Johnson tells his story to Mitchell.

 

He and the love of his life, June Allyson, grew up together and couldn't have been closer, but, when her family moved elsewhere, they lose touch with each other.

 

The scenes with Claude Jarman, Jr., who plays Johnson at a much younger age, are extraordinary.

 

Years later, when they re-connect, Allyson is shocked to learn that Johnson has not become a doctor (like his father), but has become instead a businessman who is going out with the boss's daughter.

 

Allyson has become a nurse.

 

But a tornado intervenes (?!), Johnson is forced to take care of the injured - he had two years of medical school - and suddenly realizes that Allyson was right - he should have become a doctor.

 

By this time, she has gone back home, disgusted with what she thinks that Johnson has become.

 

He thinks that she has re-married - but, just before Johnson and Mitchell took off, the "lovers" re-connect once again and she tells him that she did not re-marry.

 

By this time, Johnson and Allyson are so "re-connected" that she is able to "divine" where he is and is instrumental in his rescue (Mitchell has already died).

 

The fantasy of High Barbaree, a tale that his beloved uncle told him when he was a child, intervenes here, too, in the rescue of Johnson.

 

It's a broken romance with a supernatural element - but the director, Jack Conway, and the cast, especially Johnson and Allyson, bring it to memorable life.

 

The lesson here - true love has redemptive powers - and even fantasy can play a part.

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"High Barbaree" (1947) is an interesting "heartbreaker" - Van Johnson and Cameron Mitchell are shot down in their plane and, as they float in the plane's remains, Johnson tells his story to Mitchell.

 

He and the love of his life, June Allyson, grew up together and couldn't have been closer, but, when her family moved elsewhere, they lose touch with each other.

 

The scenes with Claude Jarman, Jr., who plays Johnson at a much younger age, are extraordinary.

 

Years later, when they re-connect, Allyson is shocked to learn that Johnson has not become a doctor (like his father), but has become instead a businessman who is going out with the boss' daughter.

 

Allyson has become a nurse.

 

But a tornado intervenes (?!), Johnson is forced to take care of the injured - he had two years of medical school - and suddenly realizes that Allyson was right - he should have become a doctor.

 

By this time, she has gone back home, disgusted with what she thinks that Johnson was become.

 

He thinks that she has re-married - but, just before Johnson and Mitchell took off, the "lovers" re-connect once again and she tells him that she did not re-marry.

 

By this time, Johnson and Allyson are so "re-connected" that she is able to "divine" where he is and is instrumental in his rescue (Mitchell has already died).

 

The fantasy of High Barbaree, a tale that his beloved uncle told him when he was a child, intervenes here, too, in the rescue of Johnson.

 

It's a broken romance with a supernatural element - but the director, Jack Conway, and the cast, especially Johnson and Allyson, bring it to memorable life.

 

The lesson here - true love has redemptive powers - and even fantasy can play a part.

Truly an excellent post. Makes me want to hunt down a copy and watch HIGH BARBAREE again.

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"The Secret Heart" - truly an original - 1946 -

 

SecretHeartStill.jpg

 

A young girl (June Allyson) has never gotten over the death of her father.

 

She has been told that he died of a heart attack.

 

She has a great deal of resentment towards her stepmother (Claudette Colbert) who had to go to work and support the family - and became successful in real estate.

 

Years later, the man who loved Colbert before she married (Walter Pidgeon) comes back into her life.

 

He was also a good friend of the deceased husband's.

 

Claudette's stepson (Robert Sterling) is going to work for him.

 

Allyson begins to transfer her loving feelings for her deceased father onto Pidgeon, who gets grilled a lot about her father.

 

A family friend (Marshall Thompson) is interested in Allyson - but she could care less and lets him know it.

 

As Allyson begins to realize that Colbert and Pidgeon are re-kindling their feelings for each other, she seems to be going off the deep end.

 

When Sterling finally tells Allyson that their father killed himself because he had stolen a great deal of money, she does go off the deep end.

 

She tries to kill herself.

 

But Colbert saves her from committing suicide.

 

Finally, Allyson is forced to face the truth and tries to start over - with Thompson.

 

This strange film, which was directed by Robert Z. Leonard, is an unusual excursion into a kind of love which is a form of "hero worship" and is totally divorced from the truth.

 

Allyson has a rare form of heartsickness and takes it out on Colbert.

 

Even Thompson, who gets little or nothing from Allyson.

 

She has to be driven to the point of death - to re-gain her sanity.

 

In the arms of Thompson, she might be able to become "whole" again.

 

But, let's face it, it's doubtful.

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"The Secret Heart" - truly an original - 1946 -

 

 

A young girl (June Allyson) has never gotten over the death of her father.

 

 

This is another MGM film where Allyson was cast as a teen and she didn't look like a teen even when she was a teen.

 

She was 29 when she made The Secret Heart and there was only a 14 year age difference between Colbert and Allyson (mother and daughter in the film).   Sorry but speaking in a childlike voice wasn't close to being convincing. 

 

PS:  The film made a solid profit so in that regard it appears the viewing public didn't care.   

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This is another MGM film where Allyson was cast as a teen and she didn't look like a teen even when she was a teen.

 

She was 29 when she made The Secret Heart and there was only a 14 year age difference between Colbert and Allyson (mother and daughter in the film).   Sorry but speaking in a childlike voice wasn't close to being convincing. 

 

I forget people don't like June Allyson. She seemed convincing to me in this role, and I liked seeing Walter Pidgeon get something more dramatic to play for a change.

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No, I love June Allyson.

 

My favorite June Allyson role in which she is too old for the part, but is lots of fun, anyway - is "Too Young To Kiss" with Van Johnson.

 

At least, she was far more convincing than Ginger Rogers in "The Major and the Minor".

 

I've just watched her in "The Girl In White" in which she elevates a very mediocre biography.

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No, I love June Allyson.

 

My favorite June Allyson role in which she is too old for the part, but is lots of fun, anyway - is "Too Young To Kiss" with Van Johnson.

 

At least, she was far more convincing than Ginger Rogers in "The Major and the Minor".

 

I've just watched her in "The Girl In White" in which she elevates a very mediocre biography.

 

Yes, Ginger was definitely too old for THE MAJOR AND THE MINOR. Ginger played a teen in the beginning scenes of HEARTBEAT, which was also unbelievable. At least June had a very girlish face and could 'pass.' 

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Yes, Ginger was definitely too old for THE MAJOR AND THE MINOR. Ginger played a teen in the beginning scenes of HEARTBEAT, which was also unbelievable. At least June had a very girlish face and could 'pass.' 

 

I give June credit for making a gallant attempt in The Secret Heart.    Can't agree that June has a very girlish face but maybe her rough sounding voice influenced me.     Note that Joan Fontaine was born the same year as June (1917) and to me Joan has a lot younger looking girlish face than Ginger or June.    (not that MGM would have gone out of their way to get Joan on loan out).

 

Either way I understand why studios would cast an experienced actress 10 years or more older than the actual character.   It can be difficult to get a first rate performance out of a teen.    E.g. Ann Blyth being 17 for Mildred Pierce pulls it off but otherwise why take the risk.      

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I give June credit for making a gallant attempt in The Secret Heart.    Can't agree that June has a very girlish face but maybe her rough sounding voice influenced me.     Note that Joan Fontaine was born the same year as June (1917) and to me Joan has a lot younger looking girlish face than Ginger or June.    (not that MGM would have gone out of their way to get Joan on loan out).

 

Either way I understand why studios would cast an experienced actress 10 years or more older than the actual character.   It can be difficult to get a first rate performance out of a teen.    E.g. Ann Blyth being 17 for Mildred Pierce pulls it off but otherwise why take the risk.      

 

You don't think June has a girlish face in GOOD NEWS, made around the same time? Of course, it depends on the make-up I suppose-- but to me, she often seemed younger than her actual years.

 

Recently, I watched several episodes of The June Allyson Show on YouTube. They were filmed in 1959, and the other actresses in those episodes (Ann Sothern, Ginger Rogers and Ann Harding) looked good but were definitely showing their age. Not June. She was wearing beautiful gowns and had chic hairstyles and when they cut to a long shot of her entering a room, she seemed so petit. She would speak directly at the camera to introduce the story, and it was hard to believe she was a big star with her own show-- because she looked like the girl next door playing dress up, very delicate looking and soft (despite the husky voice).

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You don't think June has a girlish face in GOOD NEWS, made around the same time? Of course, it depends on the make-up I suppose-- but to me, she often seemed younger than her actual years.

 

Recently, I watched several episodes of The June Allyson Show on YouTube. They were filmed in 1959, and the other actresses in those episodes (Ann Sothern, Ginger Rogers and Ann Harding) looked good but were definitely showing their age. Not June. She was wearing beautiful gowns and had chic hairstyles and when they cut to a long shot of her entering a room, she seemed so petit. She would speak directly at the camera to introduce the story, and It was hard to believe she was a big star with her own show-- because she looked like the girl next door playing dress up, very delicate looking and soft (despite the husky voice).

 

Haven't seen Good News.   As for how June aged.   I agree she aged very well.   I even posted about this a few months back.   I was watching the Judy Garland show made in 63\64 and June looked about the same as she did in her late 40s \ early 50s movies. 

 

My view on June is that she was one of those women that had a mature look when she was in her early 20s.  This type of women ages well in that her look doesn't change much as they get into their late 40s.    I.e. they look about the same over a 20 or so year period.      

 

Other women have a very youthful look in their early 20s but by their late 30s their look as changed in a noticeable way due to the contract between how they looked when they were in their 20s verses in their late 30s \ early 40s.   Of course often with these women stress or booze is the cause of their aging look.

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June Allyson could play well in musicals, comedies and dramas.

 

I would like a much younger actress in "Too Young To Kiss."

 

But would it have been as enjoyable without her unique personality?

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June Allyson could play well in musicals, comedies and dramas.

 

I would like a much younger actress in "Too Young To Kiss."

 

But would it have been as enjoyable without her unique personality?

 

I don't think so. And she had a special magic with Van Johnson that couldn't be duplicated by other actresses.

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I can remember "The Enchanted Cottage", but I didn't remember it well enough.

 

It is, I think, a film that gets often ridiculed

 

But the heartache of both Dorothy McQuire's character and Robert Young's character is very real.

 

To feel ugly - to be ugly - is, let's face it, a very devastating life experience.

 

At the end, when the miracle of the cottage is revealed, when both characters can look at each other and see a beautiful person . . . well, I just think that is a very life-affirming experience.

 

And why can't they look "beautiful" to each other?

 

I could never ridicule this film.   

 

  fb28cdc4831e7f29418fa89640c717e2.jpg

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I can remember "The Enchanted Cottage", but I didn't remember it well enough.

 

It is, I think, a film that gets often ridiculed

 

But the heartache of both Dorothy McQuire's character and Robert Young's character is very real.

 

To feel ugly - to be ugly - is, let's face it, a very devastating life experience.

 

At the end, when the miracle of the cottage is revealed, when both characters can look at each other and see a beautiful person . . . well, I just think that is a very life-affirming experience.

 

And why can't they look "beautiful" to each other?

 

I could never ridicule this film.   

 

 

 

I have mixed feeling about the Enchanted Cottage.   Well acted and a fine production but the overall theme is what I struggle with.

 

I reject the phase 'everyone is "beautiful" in their own way" because to me it attempts to redefine what beautiful means.   Instead I take the POV that being beautiful (as in being physically attractive to others),  isn't important.   I.e. on the scale of human traits that I look for in others,  being beautiful is way down the list.

 

The end of the film does make that point but most of the film appears to stress the stereotype that being beautiful is meaningful.

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I have mixed feeling about the Enchanted Cottage.   Well acted and a fine production but the overall theme is what I struggle with.

 

I reject the phase 'everyone is "beautiful" in their own way" because to me it attempts to redefine what beautiful means.   Instead I take the POV that being beautiful (as in being physically attractive to others),  isn't important.   I.e. on the scale of human traits that I look for in others,  being beautiful is way down the list.

 

The end of the film does make that point but most of the film appears to stress the stereotype that being beautiful is meaningful.

 

Interesting comments. Maybe the filmmakers are making those points for most of the movie so that when we get to the end, and all that is undercut by the real message, we are in more of a state of shock. Like we are betrayed, because what we thought was the thesis was actually the anti-thesis.

 

I like this movie, because I think it achieves what so many other trite productions fail to do. It gives us a true sense of magic-- the masks come off and it's very enchanting in a strange sort of way. Film is a visual medium, and this production effectively exploits the images of "beauty" on screen. 

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