TopBilled

TCM and Other Sources for Classic Film

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Monday February 12, 2018

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Unconventional couples on TCM

DODSWORTH with Walter Huston

DAVID AND LISA with Keir Dullea

WHO’S AFRAID OF VIRGINIA WOOLF? with Richard Burton

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Tuesday February 13, 2018

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50s foreign language films on TCM

LA STRADA with Anthony Quinn

MON ONCLE with Jacques Tati

BLACK ORPHEUS with Breno Mello

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There is so much to like in DODSWORTH.  I really like it and it's become one of my favorites.  It does a pretty good of of getting around the Production Code, too.  Excellent and timeless story with wonderful performances by everybody especially Walter Huston who, for me anyway, presents an attractive mature guy with some great qualities.  For viewers who know Walter only as the old codger in TREASURE OF SIERRA MADRE, his appearance here will be a nice surprise.

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The daytime line-up is highly unusual - you've got, among others, "Kapo", which Susan Strasberg filmed aboard, "The Umbrellas of Cherbourg", which is ever-glistening and "Day For Night", which is forever-new.   

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2 hours ago, rayban said:

The daytime line-up is highly unusual - you've got, among others, "Kapo", which Susan Strasberg filmed aboard, "The Umbrellas of Cherbourg", which is ever-glistening and "Day For Night", which is forever-new.   

I could swear I saw Lacombe, Lucien on the schedule. They might have changed it out for Kapo.

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Wednesday February 14, 2018

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Directed by Frank Borzage on FilmStruck

LILIOM (1930) with Charles Farrell

A FAREWELL TO ARMS with Gary Cooper

SECRETS with Mary Pickford

NO GREATER GLORY with Frankie Darro

MAN’S CASTLE with Spencer Tracy

HISTORY IS MADE AT NIGHT with Jean Arthur

THREE COMRADES with Robert Taylor

STRANGE CARGO with Joan Crawford

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Thursday February 15, 2018

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Classic woman on TCM

DESIGNING WOMAN with Lauren Bacall

WOMAN OF THE YEAR with Katharine Hepburn

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23 minutes ago, TopBilled said:

Thursday February 15, 2018

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Classic woman on TCM

DESIGNING WOMAN with Lauren Bacall

WOMAN OF THE YEAR with Katharine Hepburn

Awesome! Love both these films....two classy ladies (Bacall and Hepburn) with two charismatic guys (Peck and Tracy).

Though in all honesty I think I have a special preference for DESIGNING WOMAN, but as I  say they are both great movies.

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11 minutes ago, Bethluvsfilms said:

Awesome! Love both these films....two classy ladies (Bacall and Hepburn) with two charismatic guys (Peck and Tracy).

Though in all honesty I think I have a special preference for DESIGNING WOMAN, but as I  say they are both great movies.

Yes, I think it's one of Bacall's best films.

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2 minutes ago, TopBilled said:

Yes, I think it's one of Bacall's best films.

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I believe this came out around the time that Bogey had passed away, and that she and Peck remained lifelong friends (how I envy her!). 

She certainly could have used as many friends as she could get after losing Bogart.

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7 minutes ago, Bethluvsfilms said:

I believe this came out around the time that Bogey had passed away, and that she and Peck remained lifelong friends (how I envy her!). 

She certainly could have used as many friends as she could get after losing Bogart.

I agree. She and Peck also did a 1993 TV movie together, called The Portrait. 

I had a chance to see her once at a special luncheon at the University of Southern California. After the meal, she did a lengthy question and answer session. She said during the event Jeanne Moreau was one of her best friends. She had done a film for the BBC with Jeanne that was filmed in France, and they didn't know each other until the production. And she said they become instant pals.

They asked her which director she liked working with, and she raved about Robert Altman (she made two pictures with him). She referred to her early time in Hollywood as her Bogey Years, that's what she would say when they asked her about the movies she made in the 40s. She said when they made those films, it was obviously before TV and home video; and they never thought people would still be watching their performances decades later or even care about it.

A friend of mine whose father wrote the book on which THE SHOOTIST was based said he was on the set often and Bacall had problems with Duke. But she did not discuss John Wayne during the luncheon. He was not in good health at the time, and I think maybe those issues made him difficult for a lot of people to be around. I read the book after I had just seen the movie, and the book is very basic. It's a novella, not an actual novel. And her character in the book is very underdeveloped. I gained a greater appreciation for her when I realized how she brought the character to life. She's one of the best things in THE SHOOTIST. She might have started as a glamorous accessory to Bogart but she became a very good actress.

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At the time of her TV interview with Barbara Walters, I remember her saying that she was always thought of as a personality, not an actress.

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32 minutes ago, rayban said:

At the time of her TV interview with Barbara Walters, I remember her saying that she was always thought of as a personality, not an actress.

Yes. And she worked hard to challenge that underestimation of her talents.

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Friday February 16, 2018

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Written by Budd Schulberg on FilmStruck

ON THE WATERFRONT with Marlon Brando

THE HARDER THEY FALL with Humphrey Bogart

A FACE IN THE CROWD with Andy Griffith

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On 2/14/2018 at 3:29 PM, TopBilled said:

I agree. She and Peck also did a 1993 TV movie together, called The Portrait. 

I had a chance to see her once at a special luncheon at the University of Southern California. After the meal, she did a lengthy question and answer session. She said during the event Jeanne Moreau was one of her best friends. She had done a film for the BBC with Jeanne that was filmed in France, and they didn't know each other until the production. And she said they become instant pals.

They asked her which director she liked working with, and she raved about Robert Altman (she made two pictures with him). She referred to her early time in Hollywood as her Bogey Years, that's what she would say when they asked her about the movies she made in the 40s. She said when they made those films, it was obviously before TV and home video; and they never thought people would still be watching their performances decades later or even care about it.

A friend of mine whose father wrote the book on which THE SHOOTIST was based said he was on the set often and Bacall had problems with Duke. But she did not discuss John Wayne during the luncheon. He was not in good health at the time, and I think maybe those issues made him difficult for a lot of people to be around. I read the book after I had just seen the movie, and the book is very basic. It's a novella, not an actual novel. And her character in the book is very underdeveloped. I gained a greater appreciation for her when I realized how she brought the character to life. She's one of the best things in THE SHOOTIST. She might have started as a glamorous accessory to Bogart but she became a very good actress.

Very interesting stuff! Thanks for sharing, TB. I too like Bacall in that film and I particularly love her apartment which is the highest echelon of chic for the time period. Whenever I think of Bacall I always think of the nickname I think I read that Bogart's friends called her by...Ladder Legs!

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On 2/15/2018 at 1:59 PM, CaveGirl said:

Very interesting stuff! Thanks for sharing, TB. I too like Bacall in that film and I particularly love her apartment which is the highest echelon of chic for the time period. Whenever I think of Bacall I always think of the nickname I think I read that Bogart's friends called her by...Ladder Legs!

Thanks CaveGirl. I like your comment about the apartment. What fabulous set designers MGM had.

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Saturday February 17, 2018

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Farley Granger on FilmStruck

EDGE OF DOOM with Dana Andrews

HANS CHRISTIAN ANDERSEN with Danny Kaye

SENSO with Alida Valli

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4 minutes ago, TopBilled said:

Saturday February 17, 2018

Screen shot 2018-02-16 at 4.43.21 PM.png

Farley Granger on FilmStruck

EDGE OF DOOM with Dana Andrews

HANS CHRISTIAN ANDERSEN with Danny Kaye

SENSO with Alida Valli

Such a shame - that Farley Granger decided to leave Hollywood.

To go to New York City and study acting.

He was already a star.

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16 minutes ago, rayban said:

Such a shame - that Farley Granger decided to leave Hollywood.

To go to New York City and study acting.

He was already a star.

He went to Europe too, and made films in Italy.

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On ‎2‎/‎15‎/‎2018 at 2:19 PM, TopBilled said:

Friday February 16, 2018

Screen shot 2018-02-15 at 12.08.32 PM.png

Written by Budd Schulberg on FilmStruck

ON THE WATERFRONT with Marlon Brando

THE HARDER THEY FALL with Humphrey Bogart

A FACE IN THE CROWD with Andy Griffith

A FACE IN THE CROWD is a winner...who'd have thought that Andy could play such a loathsome egomaniac so convincingly? 

I am aware though the movie came out a few years before he became a TV icon on THE ANDY GRIFFITH SHOW.

THE HARDER THEY FALL is kind of painful for me to watch, knowing it's Bogey's last film. Still a good film though.

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15 minutes ago, Bethluvsfilms said:

A FACE IN THE CROWD is a winner...who'd have thought that Andy could play such a loathsome egomaniac so convincingly? 

I am aware though the movie came out a few years before he became a TV icon on THE ANDY GRIFFITH SHOW.

THE HARDER THEY FALL is kind of painful for me to watch, knowing it's Bogey's last film. Still a good film though.

There were probably people who watched to see if he could successfully play a nice guy when he signed on to do his own weekly series. Sheriff Taylor was casting against type for him in 1960.

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5 hours ago, TopBilled said:

There were probably people who watched to see if he could successfully play a nice guy when he signed on to do his own weekly series. Sheriff Taylor was casting against type for him in 1960.

I have to disagree with you here. Andy played a similar character, even with Don Knotts by his side, in

No Time for Sergeants on Broadway in 1957 and in the 1958 movie.

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11 minutes ago, Princess of Tap said:

I have to disagree with you here. Andy played a similar character, even with Don Knotts by his side, in

No Time for Sergeants on Broadway in 1957 and in the 1958 movie.

A similar character to Lonesome Rhodes or similar to Andy Taylor?

I think his role in NO TIME FOR SERGEANTS was still a boisterous one. When he started the sitcom, the goal was to take his persona in a new direction and reinvent it with a more subdued characterization. He became so identified with the Mayberry role (probably over-identified with it) that people had a hard time reconciling it with what he had done originally.

He tried to reinvent his persona again in the 70s when his follow-up sitcoms failed. He plays a perverted landlord in a TV movie called The Strangers in 7A. He also had a role as an evangelist singer that Lucy suspects of being a crook in an episode of Here's Lucy. That was probably his most unusual role, where he was still trading on being likable to the audience but having ulterior motives, which leads to Lucy's daughter Lucie following him to a motel room. 

In the 80s and 90s he was back to the more wholesome approach with Matlock. 

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2 hours ago, TopBilled said:

A similar character to Lonesome Rhodes or similar to Andy Taylor?

I think his role in NO TIME FOR SERGEANTS was still a boisterous one. When he started the sitcom, the goal was to take his persona in a new direction and reinvent it with a more subdued characterization. He became so identified with the Mayberry role (probably over-identified with it) that people had a hard time reconciling it with what he had done originally.

He tried to reinvent his persona again in the 70s when his follow-up sitcoms failed. He plays a perverted landlord in a TV movie called The Strangers in 7A. He also had a role as an evangelist singer that Lucy suspects of being a crook in an episode of Here's Lucy. That was probably his most unusual role, where he was still trading on being likable to the audience but having ulterior motives, which leads to Lucy's daughter Lucie following him to a motel room. 

In the 80s and 90s he was back to the more wholesome approach with Matlock. 

Another thing I forgot to tell you. Was that Andy Griffith used to do comedy records that they played on the radio in the 1950s. And the character that he played in these  Records Was Andy Taylor more or less. He had a particular one that I really liked about describing football from the perspective of a country bumpkin who didn't really know what was going on.

If you haven't had a chance to listen to these records you will be pleasantly surprised that he is exactly the Andy Taylor character that you saw on TV, laid-back easy-going and  country.

Later in the seventies and eighties when he would do those horrendously dramatic roles  on made for TV movies, people were just shocked at his range and persona because he was so Typecast as Andy Taylor.  Before DVDs or even VHS, people didn't have an opportunity to see these old movies on a regular basis and a lot of people were not familiar with A Face in the Crowd. The first time I saw it was in Paris in one of those old revival movie theaters in the Latin Quarter in the 1980s.

But the difference between A Face in the Crowd and No Time for Sergeants is that one was a fake and the other was a legitimate personality.

Of all of the actors on sitcoms, the one that he reminded me the most of was Eddie Albert. It was years before I ever saw Eddie Albert in some of those serious performances and I had no idea that he was the actor of the kind of the depth that he had, although I had read about his Academy Award nomination.

Also the great Broadway actress Shirley Booth-- that's probably another performer that had people totally fooled-- there was a lot of respect for her but the average person just thought that TV was probably all she  had ever done in life. The cartoon of Hazel in the Saturday Evening Post was more famous than the actress Shirley Booth herself, even if she had won an Oscar once . LOL

Jim Backus might have been one of those kind of actors too.

Truly amazing the kind of Talent they had in those sitcoms.

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3 hours ago, Princess of Tap said:

Another thing I forgot to tell you. Was that Andy Griffith used to do comedy records that they played on the radio in the 1950s. And the character that he played in these  Records Was Andy Taylor more or less. He had a particular one that I really liked about describing football from the perspective of a country bumpkin who didn't really know what was going on.

If you haven't had a chance to listen to these records you will be pleasantly surprised that he is exactly the Andy Taylor character that you saw on TV, laid-back easy-going and  country.

Later in the seventies and eighties when he would do those horrendously dramatic roles  on made for TV movies, people were just shocked at his range and persona because he was so Typecast as Andy Taylor.  Before DVDs or even VHS, people didn't have an opportunity to see these old movies on a regular basis and a lot of people were not familiar with A Face in the Crowd. The first time I saw it was in Paris in one of those old revival movie theaters in the Latin Quarter in the 1980s.

But the difference between A Face in the Crowd and No Time for Sergeants is that one was a fake and the other was a legitimate personality.

Of all of the actors on sitcoms, the one that he reminded me the most of was Eddie Albert. It was years before I ever saw Eddie Albert in some of those serious performances and I had no idea that he was the actor of the kind of the depth that he had, although I had read about his Academy Award nomination.

Also the great Broadway actress Shirley Booth-- that's probably another performer that had people totally fooled-- there was a lot of respect for her but the average person just thought that TV was probably all she  had ever done in life. The cartoon of Hazel in the Saturday Evening Post was more famous than the actress Shirley Booth herself, even if she had won an Oscar once . LOL

Jim Backus might have been one of those kind of actors too.

Truly amazing the kind of Talent they had in those sitcoms.

I agree these performers had amazing range. Shirley Booth is one of my favorites, she could do it all.

When Griffith died a few years ago, I think people felt Andy Taylor died. Most didn't see he was another man entirely, capable of bringing a variety of characters to life. The landlord role in the 70s TV movie would shock a lot of these people! 

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