TomJH

Who Is The MOST ANNOYING ACTOR In The Movies?

325 posts in this topic

I know his daughter -- lovely woman; and her husband is equally nice, and a fine pianist as well!

 

:another head slap:

 

... or two

 

==

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

:another head slap:

 

... or two

 

==

 

You're allowed your opinion of an actor's acting. A lot of big "stars" were very limited in their acting styles back then.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You know what, I feel really bad about the Gary Cooper thing. I would have edited it out but I felt it was too late. Honestly, I may not be fond of Gary Cooper as an actor but do I have to lose control with such a deplorable rant. Apologies ... :head slap:

 

-

That's okay. This is a thread subject that can easily lend itself to a rant, and I say that as someone who loves Gary Cooper.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's okay. This is a thread subject that can easily lend itself to a rant, and I say that as someone who loves Gary Cooper.

I may not think Gary Cooper is a great actor, but I think he's been very good when cast in the right role, in Sergeant York, for example. Also Peter Ibbetson -- one of Hollywood's great (and rarely seen) surrealist movies.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know his daughter -- lovely woman; and her husband is equally nice, and a fine pianist as well!

Really? You know Maria Cooper?

 

I know that she had a very close relationship with her father, who thought the world of her.

 

I hope she doesn't read these boards (I'm not speaking about any on this thread, in particular) because some posters can get a little carried away in their comments about an actor, including those about her Dad, at times. If you're proud of your father and his work, such as she is, that's bound to hurt.

 

Personally speaking, looking at the best of Coop's work (Sgt York, Meet John Doe, Pride of the Yankees, Friendly Persuasion, Hanging Tree, etc) she has, indeed, so much to feel proud of regarding her father. And he also appeared in some of my favourite adventure films turned out by Hollywood during the '30s. Few actors had such expressive eyes, in my opinion. The man conveyed so much yet appeared to be doing so little.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I may not think Gary Cooper is a great actor, but I think he's been very good when cast in the right role, in Sergeant York, for example. Also Peter Ibbetson -- one of Hollywood's great (and rarely seen) surrealist movies.

It's been years since I saw Peter Ibbetson but I remember one remarkable moment that Cooper had when he looked straight into the camera and had to fantasize that he was talking to his little girl sweetheart whom he had last seen as a boy years before (or something to that effect, the plot line is a little hazy for me). Coop, often this kind of macho performer, depending upon the material, could also be so tender and sensitive, at times. I remember thinking that it was a very touching scene because of his performance.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

'High Noon'. Perfect casting.

Yes it was. And the personal crisis that Cooper was going through at that time in his life showed up on his increasingly haggard features, adding to the anguish of his performance.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Really? You know Maria Cooper?

 

I know that she had a very close relationship with her father, who thought the world of her.

 

I hope she doesn't read these boards (I'm not speaking about any on this thread, in particular) because some posters can get a little carried away in their comments about an actor, including those about her Dad, at times. If you're proud of your father and his work, such as she is, that's bound to hurt.

 

Personally speaking, looking at the best of Coop's work (Sgt York, Meet John Doe, Pride of the Yankees, Friendly Persuasion, Hanging Tree, etc) she has, indeed, so much to feel proud of regarding her father. And he also appeared in some of my favourite adventure films turned out by Hollywood during the '30s. Few actors had such expressive eyes, in my opinion. The man conveyed so much yet appeared to be doing so little.

Yes, I worked with her on a couple of projects. Her husband is Byron Janis, a great concert pianist. They invite me to events once in a while. One of them was a reception at the French Consulate, in honor of Byron.  In one corner of the room there were three lovely ladies sitting -- Arlene Dahl, Celeste Holm, and Patricia Neal.  I think Maria is also friends with Vera Fairbanks (Douglas' widow), whom I also know.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, I worked with her on a couple of projects. Her husband is Byron Janis, a great concert pianist. They invite me to events once in a while. One of them was a reception at the French Consulate, in honor of Byron.  In one corner of the room there were three lovely ladies sitting -- Arlene Dahl, Celeste Holm, and Patricia Neal.  I think Maria is also friends with Vera Fairbanks (Douglas' widow), whom I also know.

You're very fortunate to have met these people.

 

I once sent a small fan letter to Douglas Fairbanks Jr. He responded with a two page typed letter. A very great gentleman.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's been years since I saw Peter Ibbetson but I remember one remarkable moment that Cooper had when he looked straight into the camera and had to fantasize that he was talking to his little girl sweetheart whom he had last seen as a boy years before (or something to that effect, the plot line is a little hazy for me). Coop, often this kind of macho performer, depending upon the material, could also be so tender and sensitive, at times. I remember thinking that it was a very touching scene because of his performance.

The film is highly regarded by Andre Breton and other French surrealists. Here is a paragraph about the film, written in conjunction with a screening in Berkeley:

 

“The story of a condemned man reliving his relationship with a childhood sweetheart, Peter Ibbetson is well known as one of the most beautifully photographed American films (Charles Lang was the cameraman) and an example of Hollywood romanticism at its most extreme. Though not too well known in this country, Peter Ibbetson inspired the French Surrealists to wild flights of paroxysmic prose-poetry, as witness these examples. ‘This prodigious film, this triumph of surrealist thinking’ (Andre Breton, in ‘L’amour Fou’). ‘(V)ictory over time and death is the theme of Peter Ibbetson...(which) centers around the most marvelous case of cinematographic “mad love.” Since childhood, Mary and Peter (Ann Harding and Gary Cooper) have been in love. This love, this feeling, day after day more intense, more burning, forbids them to part. In an ultimate gesture of destruction of the concepts of time and space, the lovers meet and really love, the dream reaches its true grandeur, and embodying itself, unites their two bodies. Human conventions, death itself, everything is trampled by this love, more powerful than anything. Rational logic falls apart, stock ideas are only houses made of cards.... This film, insofar as it shows the ultimate defeat of anything which opposes itself to love, should be screened regularly in all the movie theatres all over the world’ (Ado Kyrou, “Surrealism in Film”).” --“Treasures from the UCLA Film Archives,” PFA Publication"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, this is turning into a Gary Cooper et al Admiration Society, and I'm glad of it. Something good coming out of it, anyway.

 

Byron Janis , eh ... how ironic, me being a huge CM fan ...

 

smiff lysst roryyk bllesst er ffejjcuuuc ....

 

Excuse me if I sound a little garbled ... I'm still trying to get my foot out of my mouth ...

 

okay enough, laffite

 

... maybe we should try to find that old Gary Cooper thread ... Seriously, it had about 10,000 replies, maybe even more ... it was easily the most popular star thread ever here on the boards ...

 

---

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, this is turning into a Gary Cooper et al Admiration Society, and I'm glad of it. Something good coming out of it, anyway.

 

Byron Janis , eh ... how ironic, me being a huge CM fan ...

 

smiff lysst roryyk bllesst er ffejjcuuuc ....

 

Excuse me if I sound a little garbled ... I'm still trying to get my foot out of my mouth ...

 

okay enough, laffite

 

... maybe we should try to find that old Gary Cooper thread ... Seriously, it had about 10,000 replies, maybe even more ... it was easily the most popular star thread ever here on the boards ...

 

---

Way off topic: Something I did not know until recently, Lafitte, is the Byron's first wife was the sister of Clarissa Dickson Wright! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The film is highly regarded by Andre Breton and other French surrealists. Here is a paragraph about the film, written in conjunction with a screening in Berkeley:

 

“The story of a condemned man reliving his relationship with a childhood sweetheart, Peter Ibbetson is well known as one of the most beautifully photographed American films (Charles Lang was the cameraman) and an example of Hollywood romanticism at its most extreme. Though not too well known in this country, Peter Ibbetson inspired the French Surrealists to wild flights of paroxysmic prose-poetry, as witness these examples. ‘This prodigious film, this triumph of surrealist thinking’ (Andre Breton, in ‘L’amour Fou’). ‘(V)ictory over time and death is the theme of Peter Ibbetson...(which) centers around the most marvelous case of cinematographic “mad love.” Since childhood, Mary and Peter (Ann Harding and Gary Cooper) have been in love. This love, this feeling, day after day more intense, more burning, forbids them to part. In an ultimate gesture of destruction of the concepts of time and space, the lovers meet and really love, the dream reaches its true grandeur, and embodying itself, unites their two bodies. Human conventions, death itself, everything is trampled by this love, more powerful than anything. Rational logic falls apart, stock ideas are only houses made of cards.... This film, insofar as it shows the ultimate defeat of anything which opposes itself to love, should be screened regularly in all the movie theatres all over the world’ (Ado Kyrou, “Surrealism in Film”).” --“Treasures from the UCLA Film Archives,” PFA Publication"

Generally speaking, Coop stayed within his comfort zone as an actor. However, it shows his courage to have tackled a role so very different from any other he ever played before. It also says something about him, too, because the stage play of Peter Ibbetson had once been performed by no less than the much esteemed John Barrymore then approaching his prime as a stage actor. I'm sure that a few of those reviewing Cooper's performance may have had memories of Barrymore by which to compare it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I may not think Gary Cooper is a great actor, but I think he's been very good when cast in the right role, in Sergeant York, for example. Also Peter Ibbetson -- one of Hollywood's great (and rarely seen) surrealist movies.

For anyone interested, Peter Ibbetson is available from Universal as part of The Gary Cooper Collection (five films, including Beau Geste, Lives of a Bengal Lancer, The General Died at Dawn (a great favourite of mine) and Design for Living.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm trying to do my best to separate actors who truly annoy me from those I just don't care for.  Some actors fall into both categories; however there are some who don't annoy me persay, I just don't care for them.  Someone like June Allyson for example, doesn't really annoy me, I just don't care for her.

Some of the people that have been listed so far have surprised me as I love that person and don't find them at all annoying; then there are other actors who have been mentioned--I fully agreed.  It's cool though, everyone is entitled to their opinion and everyone is unique in their pet peeves and such; so I wasn't upset.  It was more interesting than anything-- you can learn quite a bit about someone you really only know as a screenname based on the reasons why particular actors grate on the nerves.

I'm still thinking; but here's what I came up with so far:

MIRIAM HOPKINS- The fact that she fought with my beloved Bette Davis already puts one strike against her; however, she gives off this vibe that she thinks she is much more talented than she really is.  I knew Bette Davis.  She is no Bette Davis.  (okay, I didn't really know Bette Davis; but I thought it was a funny thing to say).  She drove me the craziest during Virginia City starring my boyfriend Errol.  Her singing was annoying, her face was annoying, everything about her was annoying.  Seeing that Errol basically held her hand at the end of the film (when their characters supposedly ended up together) I think he felt the same about her.

PATRIC KNOWLES- He typically pops up in a lot of Errol's movies as well--often as Errol's rival and often they're courting the same girl.  I just don't like his acting, he's bland and his characters are always so whiny.  As much as I love The Adventures of Robin Hood, I find his Will Scarlett to grate on my nerves.  I wish someone else had been cast-- I don't know who; but someone else.  I think the Will Scarlett scene that annoys me the most is when he starts playing the lute while Robin Hood spars with Little John.  Knowles' facial expressions during that scene are irritating.  The only saving grace in this film is that his part is small.  That is also the only reason I tolerated him in Auntie Mame because he didn't really have a large role.

 

KATHRYN GRAYSON- Ugh.  She annoys me to no end in Anchors Aweigh.  I love Gene Kelly and Frank Sinatra, so their roles make the film tolerable and enjoyable when Grayson's "Aunt Susie" character is off screen.  I liked the ridiculous song that Kelly and Sinatra made up about Grayson's character.  I really, truly hate her singing.  I realize that her whole wanting to sing with Jose Iturbi subplot was important as it provided the Sinatra character with a means to try and win Susie's heart; but ugh.  Her singing.  I wish Aunt Susie had been an aspiring jazz saxophonist or something.

 

PHIL SILVERS- I don't find him funny.  His voice is annoying.  How Gene Kelly and Judy Garland (who I both love) didn't kill him in Summer Stock, I don't know.  His dunce routine can only go so far and his type of humor just doesn't do anything for me.

 

JERRY LEWIS- Ugh.  That's all I can say.  Aside from his annoying movie characters; He as a person is obnoxious too.  Good thing Dean Martin got out of that movie partnership.  Dino was awesome and was much better solo. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have not been able to sit through a single Jerry Lewis or Jim Carrey film.  I find them very similar in their style of  humor and total lack of appeal to me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

MIRIAM HOPKINS- The fact that she fought with my beloved Bette Davis already puts one strike against her; however, she gives off this vibe that she thinks she is much more talented than she really is.  I knew Bette Davis.  She is no Bette Davis.  (okay, I didn't really know Bette Davis; but I thought it was a funny thing to say).  She drove me the craziest during Virginia City starring my boyfriend Errol.  Her singing was annoying, her face was annoying, everything about her was annoying.  Seeing that Errol basically held her hand at the end of the film (when their characters supposedly ended up together) I think he felt the same about her.

 

You might've missed some of Hopkins' best roles, which came in the 1930's. For me, her best performance is in Becky Sharp (1935) for which she was nominated for Best Actress (but lost to Bette Davis.) She is also terrific in Trouble in Paradise (it's hard not to like her in that one) Barbary Coast (also 1935), These Three, the original Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde with Fredric March (and in which she allegedly had a nude scene that was cut!) and The Smiling Lieutenant and the shocking pre-Code The Story of Temple Drake. I also happen to like her prickly turns in The Old Maid and Old Acquaintance, although neither film is all that great. She took a six year break from features after 1943, but is also very good in supporting performances in The Heiress, The Mating Season and The Children's Hour.

 

She was apparently something of an egomaniacal scene-stealer and real pain in the b u t t to work with, and her characters are often not likeable, but she was a fine, and enjoyable actress.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You might've missed some of Hopkins' best roles, which came in the 1930's. For me, her best performance is in Becky Sharp (1935) for which she was nominated for Best Actress (but lost to Bette Davis.) She is also terrific in Trouble in Paradise (it's hard not to like her in that one) Barbary Coast (also 1935), These Three, the original Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde with Fredric March (and in which she allegedly had a nude scene that was cut!) and The Smiling Lieutenant and the shocking pre-Code The Story of Temple Drake. I also happen to like her prickly turns in The Old Maid and Old Acquaintance, although neither film is all that great. She took a six year break from features after 1943, but is also very good in supporting performances in The Heiress, The Mating Season and The Children's Hour.

 

She was apparently something of an egomaniacal scene-stealer and real pain in the b u t t to work with, and her characters are often not likeable, but she was a fine, and enjoyable actress.

 

I agree that Hopkins was a fine actress and she has been in some very good movies, as both the lead and as a supporting character.   But as noted often her characters are not likeable (e.g. I saw The Children's Hour last night).    Even in The Heiress, where she is playing the role of a supporting aunt she isn't that supporting.   Her characters often are trouble makers.

 

So I find Hopkins similar to Shelly Winters;   yea, they both played a lot of annoying characters but they played them very well.  That takes talent.     Another 30's performance is in the racy film Designed for Living.    Of course those that find Cooper and Hopkins annoying may not enjoy that film.  

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

'High Noon'. Perfect casting.

Really? Cooper in his 50s and Grace Kelly in her early 20s? I know you made a point that you thought a 30 yr old Ronald Reagan made a fine college student in Knute Rockne but I'd have to disagree... 'High Noon' was creepy... He totally looked like her father if not her GRANDfather... Ick... Maybe then again you could follow Warren Jeffs and 30 yr age gaps are nothing...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Really? Cooper in his 50s and Grace Kelly in her early 20s? I know you made a point that you thought a 30 yr old Ronald Reagan made a fine college student in Knute Rockne but I'd have to disagree... 'High Noon' was creepy... He totally looked like her father if not her GRANDfather... Ick... Maybe then again you could follow Warren Jeffs and 30 yr age gaps are nothing...

The age discrepancy between Cooper and Kelly is only one aspect to the film. In that respect, you could question most of the films made by top '30s and '40s leading men who were aging during the 1950s (not just Cooper but Stewart, Wayne, Gable, Flynn, etc.) and their younger generation female co-stars in most instances. And if you wanted to continue to make a case about the age difference, you could just as well criticize a young Grace Kelly in the part of the Quaker woman, rather than concentrate just upon Cooper.

 

Cooper brought that sense of integrity and honesty to the role of Will Kane in High Noon that was so integral to the role. At the same time, with his those aging weary looking features, Coop also brought a touch of vulnerability to the part, as well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I knew Max in the last few years of his life.  He was a very close friend of Katharine Hepburn and lived near her in Chester, Conn.  Max, as you may recall, played the Minister in "10".  When the old lady passes in front of the camera and *makes a noise*, the dog jumps up and runs away.  Max says to Dudley Moore: "Whenever Mrs. Kissell breaks wind we beat the dog".

 

Every few months I used to call Max's number and, in my very excellent imitation of him, would say "May I speak with Mrs. Kissell please!"  He would always reply, "I'm sorry, but she's out beating the dog again!"

 

Max was a great musician and a real fun guy.  He was very close to Mary Martin and had many photos of them together hung around his house.  During his last years he was very active in a local theater company.  A real solid citizen.

Ray,  I go along with TomJH 's comment in reply to your posting.  Since Max Showalter may have been a nice guy in real life I guess maybe we should be  acknowledging his talents as an actor, this kind of reminds me of the high regard many of us have for  that "weasel"  Dan Duryea.  The persona that an actor puts out on the screen may be 180 degrees from his real identity. :rolleyes:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You're very fortunate to have met these people.

 

I once sent a small fan letter to Douglas Fairbanks Jr. He responded with a two page typed letter. A very great gentleman.

I worked with him once. He was the personification of the word "gentleman!" 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As long as no one gets too abusive in their comments this can be a good thread for people to vent their feelings,  let off a little steam. ;)  And always keep in mind that the person you see on the screen doesn't always represent the person in real life.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

New Members:

Register Here

Learn more about the new message boards:

FAQ

Having problems?

Contact Us