TomJH

Who Is The MOST ANNOYING ACTOR In The Movies?

325 posts in this topic

You might've missed some of Hopkins' best roles, which came in the 1930's. For me, her best performance is in Becky Sharp (1935) for which she was nominated for Best Actress (but lost to Bette Davis.) She is also terrific in Trouble in Paradise (it's hard not to like her in that one) Barbary Coast (also 1935), These Three, the original Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde with Fredric March (and in which she allegedly had a nude scene that was cut!) and The Smiling Lieutenant and the shocking pre-Code The Story of Temple Drake. I also happen to like her prickly turns in The Old Maid and Old Acquaintance, although neither film is all that great. She took a six year break from features after 1943, but is also very good in supporting performances in The Heiress, The Mating Season and The Children's Hour.

 

She was apparently something of an egomaniacal scene-stealer and real pain in the b u t t to work with, and her characters are often not likeable, but she was a fine, and enjoyable actress.

Excellent post. I think she is a fabulous performer.  And after Vivien Leigh, I think she is the only Hollywood actress of her generation who could have pulled off Scarlett O'Hara convincingly-- she certainly had the authentic Georgia mannerisms and accent working in her favor. 

 

So many great Hopkins performances, but I think the one I most enjoy is her last film role in THE CHASE as Robert Redford's distraught mother. She takes what would be a minor thankless role in any other actress' hands and wrings the bejeezus out of it and manages to upstage Marlon Brando (not an easy thing to do).

 

I have a feeling she was quite hated by many costars because she spent nights dreaming and scheming of ways to take scenes away from others, and nobody on any set was ever safe going up against her. And she must have been the favorite of many directors, because she was bound to ensure that everyone else worked hard to keep up with her and not come up short-handed. That kind of ruthless competition as an actor is something I appreciate as a viewer. Every time you see a Miriam Hopkins film, no matter how big or tiny her part is, you know it's going to be vastly entertaining.

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I know you made a point that you thought a 30 yr old Ronald Reagan made a fine college student in Knute Rockne but I'd have to disagree...

 

I most certainly did NOT. Not sure what's happening around here, but this is the second day in a row that someone has confused me with somebody else.

 

I always know what I've said - and the only thing I've said recently about Reagan is that if I could go back in the past I might think about "adjusting" his pillow during the 2nd week of February, 1911.

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...Coop also brought a touch of vulnerability to the part, as well.

 

Yep, Tom. Let people say what they want about Coop's usual "stoicism", THAT right THERE is what I always thought he brought to almost EVERY role he ever played.

 

(...in the history of cinema, there are few actor's who specialized in playing "the hero" and who could convey that very thing of "vulnerability" so well...and as you said earlier, ESPECIALLY with those eyes of his)

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 Not sure what's happening around here, but this is the second day in a row that someone has confused me with somebody else.

 

You're obviously the victim of some vast right-wing conspiracy.

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You're obviously the victim of some vast right-wing conspiracy.

 

We're not supposed to talk about left or right wings anymore.

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The age discrepancy between Cooper and Kelly is only one aspect to the film. In that respect, you could question most of the films made by top '30s and '40s leading men who were aging during the 1950s (not just Cooper but Stewart, Wayne, Gable, Flynn, etc.) and their younger generation female co-stars in most instances. And if you wanted to continue to make a case about the age difference, you could just as well criticize a young Grace Kelly in the part of the Quaker woman, rather than concentrate just upon Cooper.

 

Cooper brought that sense of integrity and honesty to the role of Will Kane in High Noon that was so integral to the role. At the same time, with his those aging weary looking features, Coop also brought a touch of vulnerability to the part, as well.

I wasn't talking about other movies, I was responding to someone who said 'perfect casting' to this movie. I would have had no issues if Gary didn't have liver spots older than Grace. It smacked of 'arranged marriage' which is even creepier... What's worse is that he was actually DOING Grace on the side... Can you say 'daddy issues'?! I guess since Cooper had 'mommy issues', they were a perfect match.

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I wasn't talking about other movies, I was responding to someone who said 'perfect casting' to this movie. I would have had no issues if Gary didn't have liver spots older than Grace. It smacked of 'arranged marriage' which is even creepier... What's worse is that he was actually DOING Grace on the side... Can you say 'daddy issues'?! I guess since Cooper had 'mommy issues', they were a perfect match.

 

Man, you are one dedicated ageist.

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I most certainly did NOT. Not sure what's happening around here, but this is the second day in a row that someone has confused me with somebody else.

 

I always know what I've said - and the only thing I've said recently about Reagan is that if I could go back in the past I might think about "adjusting" his pillow during the 2nd week of February, 1911.

Ah... It was Richard Kimble... Sorry about that... :-)

 

Too many threads ago..

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Man, you are one virulent ageist.

LOL... only when it comes to believable casting... Virulent or dedicated?! Perfect word selection to go with perfect casting?! LOL

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LOL... only when it comes to believable casting...

 

You responded too quickly. I realized "virulent" was a wrong word choice and changed it.

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You responded too quickly. I realized "virulent" was a wrong word choice and changed it.

No problemo... I LOVE the edit button.

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'High Noon'. Perfect casting.

I think perfect casting would have been Cooper with Marjorie Main or Miriam Hopkins... Someone who looked like his granddaughter? Ick... Warren Jeffsville...

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I think perfect casting would have been Cooper with Marjorie Main or Miriam Hopkins... Someone who looked like his granddaughter? Ick... Warren Jeffsville...

 

Not a chance. He's a brave, handsome marshall. Any well-raised, church-going young woman of that era would be proud to love and marry him, and Grace was perfect for the part.

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I think perfect casting would have been Cooper with Marjorie Main or Miriam Hopkins... Someone who looked like his granddaughter? Ick... Warren Jeffsville...

 

Rip, with all due respect ...

 

:)

 

...Majorie Main, oh please

 

...Mariam Hopkins, possibly

 

...Grace Kelly, okay perhaps a stretch, but it works. There's a long history of long-in-the-tooth men who are paired with the young woman and who get away with it on screen. Hign Noon, another example. Golden-Age Hollywood throws that at us all the time, it seems. The leading lady in a movie like this must be a looker ...

 

(but still a valid criticism; if not decisive, at least arguable ,,, but we gotta remember, this is Hollywood ... )

 

:)

 

PS ... Rip, I know you understand the general point of what I'm trying to say, but just don't agree in the present case. I respect that. .

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Every time you see a Miriam Hopkins film, no matter how big or tiny her part is, you know it's going to be vastly entertaining.

 

I agree with the Hopkins assessment. You really notice all she does if you watch her with the sound turned off.

It's AMAZING all she conveys just with facial expression-often fleeting-but enough to tell you what she's thinking. The Barrymores all were masters at this. I've always wondered if it came from years of acting in silent pictures?

 

To get back on topic, I find Joe E. Brown the most annoying comedian in the movies. I tolerate his goofy performance in SOME LIKE IT HOT, but rush for the remote if ever catching a movie with him in it.

 

I may not find Red Skelton funny, but I don't have the same **** reaction to him as I do Brown.

There's many actors I don't care for, but wouldn't go as far to say "annoying" meaning that I avoid anything they're in.

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Every time you see a Miriam Hopkins film, no matter how big or tiny her part is, you know it's going to be vastly entertaining.

 

It took me a while to like Miriam Hopkins, but once I saw The Story of Temple Drake and Trouble in Paradise, it all fell into place. 

 

Funny thing about Hopkins is that the first time I ever heard of her was about 30 years ago, when I came across her on the back cover of a LIFE magazine, selling Lucky Strike cigarettes.  At that point I had no idea who she was.

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To get back on topic, I find Joe E. Brown the most annoying comedian in the movies. I tolerate his goofy performance in SOME LIKE IT HOT, but rush for the remote if ever catching a movie with him in it.

 

I may not find Red Skelton funny, but I don't have the same **** reaction to him as I do Brown.

There's many actors I don't care for, but wouldn't go as far to say "annoying" meaning that I avoid anything they're in.

 

That just shows how subjective all this really is.  I'd rather watch an intestinal transplant than watch ten more seconds of Red Skelton, but Joe E. Brown doesn't bring anywhere near that reaction in me.  In fact I find his three baseball movies to be a lot of fun.  I'm pretty sure it has to do with the fact that Skelton's humor emerged on screen around the same time as those unspeakably lame Hope/Crosby road movies, where what I'd call "aggressive cluelessness" was the main component of their characters.  In a way I have the same reaction to Skelton and Hope as I do to Mae West:  How in the h e l l would any sane woman put up with this bozo for more than 30 seconds? (Not that Mae West was a bozo, but her sexual attractiveness was about on the same level as Bob's or Red's, and to me that disconnect destroys the credibility of their movies.)

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There's been some knocking on this thread of Bob Hope, of whom I would now like to make a defence.

 

Looking back on his film career, I think it can be broken into three stages as far as his screen persona is concerned.

 

1. His early films, those up to 1940, find Hope as a leading man type who sings, cracks some jokes but is also capable of charming the ladies. He is presented on screen as being relatively attractive, quite smooth talking. His highlght screen appearances during this period were in The Cat and the Canary and The Ghost Breakers, a pair of scare comedies in which he plays wise cracking hero to Paulette Goddard and is, in my opinion, more than winning and likable. GB, in particular, has Hope playing it like a fraidy cat in the film's early scenes but turning heroic later on. He is more than credible in both, I feel.

 

2. His films of the 1940s. This is when Hope finally evolved into and realized his screen persona as a fraidy cat comedian. He is no longer so smooth with the ladies. He is more the fresh kid from next door now. His films of this period include the best of the Road series with Crosby (with whom I think Hope has a remarkable chemistry), as well as such titles as My Favorite Blonde (spies with Madelienne Carroll), and, going over to Goldwyn for one of his best, The Princess and the Pirate (with Virginia Mayo and a crazy, hilarious Walter Brennan, off whom Hope bounces well).

 

At one point in Princess, Brennan, playing a simpleton, in referring to his own brother, says, "He's twice as smart as me."

 

"Oh, a half wit, eh?" Hope quickly responds in just one small illustration of his beautiful timing and comic line delivery during this period. Hope could also do a reasonable amount of facial comic shtick, as well, though verbal comedy was clearly his forte.

 

This is the period of Bob Hope's career for which I love him, even if the material may be a little stale, at times. No matter how dated the surroundings, he and Bing bounced off one another sublimely during the best of their '40s films together (the roads to Zanzibar, Morocco, Utopia and Rio).

 

3. His career from the '50s onward. By now Hope is something of a institution, starting to do as much television work (eventually far more) as film. As he ages, he loses the energy and charm of his youth, in my opinion, as his films become increasingly more pedestrian and, eventually, even embarrassing (during the '60s). This is the period in which Hope's conservative politics become more tightly associated with him, and he becomes a somewhat polarizing figure.

 

This is not a period in which I enjoy watching Hope.

 

It's because of that second stage of his career, the 1940s, that I continue feel a lot of affection for Bob Hope as a performer.

 

One other thing, as a kid, I used to collect a series of comic books called The Adventures of Bob Hope. I found them great fun at the time, but I think they were mainly concentrating upon his '40s persona in them. I guess that's part of the reason why they charmed me so much.

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There's been some knocking on this thread of Bob Hope, of whom I would now like to make a defence.

 

Looking back on his film career, I think it can be broken into three stages as far as his screen persona is concerned.

 

1. His early films, those up to 1940, find Hope as a leading man type who sings, cracks some jokes but is also capable of charming the ladies. He is presented on screen as being relatively attractive, quite smooth talking. His highlght screen appearances during this period were in The Cat and the Canary and The Ghost Breakers, a pair of scare comedies in which he plays wise cracking hero to Paulette Goddard and is, in my opinion, more than winning and likable. GB, in particular, has Hope playing it like a fraidy cat in the film's early scenes but turning heroic later on. He is more than credible in both, I feel.

 

2. His films of the 1940s. This is when Hope finally evolved into and realized his screen persona as a fraidy cat comedian. He is no longer so smooth with the ladies. He is more the fresh kid from next door now. His films of this period include the best of the Road series with Crosby (with whom I think Hope has a remarkable chemistry), as well as such titles as My Favorite Blonde (spies with Madelienne Carroll), and, going over to Goldwyn for one of his best, The Princess and the Pirate (with Virginia Mayo and a crazy, hilarious Walter Brennan, off whom Hope bounces well).

 

At one point in Princess, Brennan, playing a simpleton, in referring to his own brother, says, "He's twice as smart as me."

 

"Oh, a half wit, eh?" Hope quickly responds in just one small illustration of his beautiful timing and comic line delivery during this period. Hope could also do a reasonable amount of facial comic shtick, as well, though verbal comedy was clearly his forte.

 

This is the period of Bob Hope's career for which I love him, even if the material may be a little stale, at times. No matter how dated the surroundings, he and Bing bounced off one another sublimely during the best of their '40s films together (the roads to Zanzibar, Morocco, Utopia and Rio).

 

3. His career from the '50s onward. By now Hope is something of a institution, starting to do as much television work (eventually far more) as film. As he ages, he loses the energy and charm of his youth, in my opinion, as his films become increasingly more pedestrian and, eventually, even embarrassing (during the '60s). This is the period in which Hope's conservative politics become more tightly associated with him, and he becomes a somewhat polarizing figure.

 

This is not a period in which I enjoy watching Hope.

 

It's because of that second stage of his career, the 1940s, that I continue feel a lot of affection for Bob Hope as a performer.

 

One other thing, as a kid, I used to collect a series of comic books called The Adventures of Bob Hope. I found them great fun at the time, but I think they were mainly concentrating upon his '40s persona in them. I guess that's part of the reason why they charmed me so much.

Assuming we can compare men and women, June Allyson was even more annoying than Max/Casey. They would have made a dream (or nightmare) couple....Wasn't there a baseball player named Max Casey?

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Assuming we can compare men and women, June Allyson was even more annoying than Max/Casey. They would have made a dream (or nightmare) couple....Wasn't there a baseball player named Max Casey?

 

No ... but Casey does seem to be a 'baseball' name ... "Casey at the Bat" , Casey Stengel ... there are a number of last-name Caseys listed in the baseball reference sites, but no one special ... but, you're right, Max Casey sounds very baseball .

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No ... but Casey does seem to be a 'baseball' name ... "Casey at the Bat" , Casey Stengel ... there are a number of last-name Caseys listed in the baseball reference sites, but no one special ... but, you're right, Max Casey sounds very baseball .

 

Max Carey, one of the game's all-time base stealing artists,  was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1961.  There's never been a Major League baseball player named Max Casey.

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Max Carey, one of the game's all-time base stealing artists,  was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1961. 

And, coincidentally, Carey was the most annoying player in baseball.

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And, coincidentally, Carey was the most annoying player in baseball.

 

Rich, you are sometimes so good at uncovering useless but interesting facts about many things and so I couldn't help but go poste haste to internet search engines to see whether I could find something annoying about Max Carely. He stole a lot of bases which of course is always annoying. But especially important was that when his playing days were over, he "went on to manage the Dodgers from 1932 to 1933, as well as the Milwaukee Chicks and the Fort Wayne Daisies of the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League." Now that can be annoying if you don't like goils, or think perhaps that goils should not be playing baseball. As far as I can tell he did not write a memoir about his experiences as, uh, manager. That's pretty annoying too.

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3. His career from the '50s onward. By now Hope is something of a institution, starting to do as much television work (eventually far more) as film. As he ages, he loses the energy and charm of his youth, in my opinion, as his films become increasingly more pedestrian and, eventually, even embarrassing (during the '60s). This is the period in which Hope's conservative politics become more tightly associated with him, and he becomes a somewhat polarizing figure.

 

This is not a period in which I enjoy watching Hope.

 

I do sort of enjoy the three films he made with Phyllis Diller. By this point, his formula consisted of putting him with some hot young foreign actress.  So when we see Diller in his movies, we know he is not going to wind up with her, but she is going to be a very good foil for him.

 

Most of his films from the 60s & 70s are pretty awful, though.

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I do sort of enjoy the three films he made with Phyllis Diller. By this point, his formula consisted of putting him with some hot young foreign actress.  So when we see Diller in his movies, we know he is not going to wind up with her, but she is going to be a very good foil for him.

 

Most of his films from the 60s & 70s are pretty awful, though.

It's rather interesting, academically, at least, looking at a film like Bachelor in Paradise, which Hope made in 1961. Now clearly a middle aged man with a bit of a paunch, he is being portrayed as being catnip to the ladies in this film, to a large degree. This is a far cry from the eager beaver Hope of the '40s (his greatest period, in my opinion) who didn't have his leading ladies immediately tumbling for him.

 

The charm that I found in Hope two decades before was long gone by this time, unfortunately.

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