lydecker

TCM Programming Challenge #27 -- What A Character! (Challenges)

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TCM Programming Challenge #27:  What a Character!

 

Challenge 1:  What A Character Actor!

You are to program a prime time evening with a minimum of 4 films saluting a deserving character actor as your Star Of The Month. Your SOTM/What A Character Actor! must have appeared in at least 20 films over the course of his/her career.  Your selection may be an American character actor . . .or not.  In other words, great character actors and actresses from films produced worldwide are eligible to be selected as your SOTM.  You may have 2 films in this challenge which will not go against your premiere limit. Mark these as SOTM-Exempt.

 

Challenge 2:  What A Decade of Incredible Characters!

You are to program a block of films (minimum of 4) saluting some of the great characters of a specific decade.  For instance:  If you were to choose the 1940’s as your decade you might select films which star or feature characters such as: Waldo Lydecker (Laura,) Brigid O’Shaughnessy (The Maltese Falcon,) Tracy Lord (The Philadelphia Story,) Johnny Rocco (Key Largo,) Lawrence Talbot (The Wolf Man) etc.  All characters must be from films released in the same decade but there is no other restriction.  Be creative  -- Remember these are your “incredible characters” and they do not have to be in films which were box office hits or Oscar nominees.  You may have 2 films in this challenge which will not go against your premiere limit.  Mark these as IC-Exempt.

 

Challenge 3 (Optional):  What An Animated Character!

You are to program a block of films (minimum of 4) selected and introduced by a Guest Programmer who is an animated character.  The Guest Programmer must have appeared in a theatrical release (feature, short or cartoon) between the years 1930 – 1970.   You may use a Disney animated character as your guest programmer but you may NOT program prohibited Disney animated features in your schedule. If you opt to include Challenge 3 in your schedule you may not have an additional Guest Programmer.

 

You may use up to 10 premieres in this challenge.  If you are in doubt as to whether or not a particular film is a TCM Premiere you may post an inquiry on a special thread which I will start for this challenge to solicit help from the TCM community.  Please try to limit inquiries on this thread to 2 films out of your 10. 

 

Let the games begin!

 

Lydecker

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Great challenge Lydecker!

 

I think I've already got my SOTM character actor and animated guest programmer set!

 

Looking forward to seeing what everyone comes up with!

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So am I!  This challenge is dedicated to all those incredible character actors we love

who never get a chance to be SOTMs.  I think the "decade of characters" will be fun

for everyone, too.

 

Almost sorry I am on the "other side" of this challenge.  I have at least 5 animated characters in 

mind would be a riot as GPs.

 

Good luck to everyone.

 

Lydecker

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I'm thinking that it's someone who typically wasn't in a lead or secondary lead role.  Someone whose name probably didn't get billed directly above (in a large font) or below the title (in a slightly less large font) on the movie poster.  Rather someone who may be listed at the bottom in small print or they didn't even make it onto the movie poster at all. 

 

That's how I'm tackling it. 

 

Those whose names are in close proximity to the title on the movie poster are being billed as "the stars."  Those are the names that are being used to sell the movie to the audience.  "William Powell and Carole Lombard in My Man Godfrey" will sell movie tickets.  "Eugene Pallette in My Man Godfrey" will not.  He may sell a few to a very specific type of audience member who specifically seeks out his films; but for the average layman movie watcher, they're looking for big, recognizable names.

 

Poster%20-%20My%20Man%20Godfrey%20%28193

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How does one distinguish a character actor from any other kind of actor?

I think this definition is a pretty fair one:

 

A character actor is a supporting actor skilled at playing distinctly unusual, interesting, or eccentric characters such that they often play the same "type" ("grande dame," busybody," "tough broad," "kindly old gentleman," etc. etc.) and play many, many roles convincingly and memorably. The term, often contrasted with that of leading/actress, is somewhat abstract and open to interpretation since all actors play "characters" but the usual sense is that a character actor plays a distinctive and important SUPPORTING role. Unlike leading actors, they are generally less glamorous. They may occasionally play leading roles (Edna May Oliver comes to mind) but they are usually in support of the stars. 

 

Here's a link to what one site lists as the:  "Essential Character Actors."

http://classicfilmguide.com/indexb600.html

 

Another link:

http://www.classicmoviehub.com/actresses/character/last-name/a/page/1/

 

Cheers!

 

Lydecker

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Love it. Character actors never get enough attention. I'm one of those people who watches a movie because Ward Bond is in it, so I'm all over this.

 

The definition of a character actor makes me raise a question that might be for others' benefit as well. Right this minute TCM's SOTM Melvyn Douglas is a wonderful man who started out as a "Leading Man" then later became a "Character Actor." I can think of a few similar actors who had the same type of career and who might have played the Romantic Lead but never achieved Cary Grant-type stardom anyway. Might Melvyn Douglas and the like count as a character actor for your purposes?

 

Also, just to be clear--the cartoon character doesn't have to schedule cartoons, right?

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Ha!  Ward Bond never had a more devoted fan than you, LP.  But, clearly I feel the same way about character actors.  

 

I know there are many actors who "crossed the character line." Melvyn Douglas is an interesting "hybrid" of leading man and character actor.  Claude Rains is a similar hybrid.  Gene Hackman, too. There were lots of those type actors.  Often someone who was a leading actor/actress in his/her younger days, moved on to play character parts.  While I traditionally think of character actors as folks who played in support (Donald Crisp, Nat Pendleton, Una Merkel, Eve Arden etc. etc.) I am not the "Character Actor Nazi."  If you consider someone to be a character actor/actress, then go for it.  

 

The animated character GP does NOT have to program cartoons.  I always imagined he/she would program feature films as any Guest Programmer would. Again, your call.

 

Lydecker

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I think this definition is a pretty fair one:

 

A character actor is a supporting actor skilled at playing distinctly unusual, interesting, or eccentric characters such that they often play the same "type" ("grande dame," busybody," "tough broad," "kindly old gentleman," etc. etc.) and play many, many roles convincingly and memorably. The term, often contrasted with that of leading/actress, is somewhat abstract and open to interpretation since all actors play "characters" but the usual sense is that a character actor plays a distinctive and important SUPPORTING role. Unlike leading actors, they are generally less glamorous. They may occasionally play leading roles (Edna May Oliver comes to mind) but they are usually in support of the stars. 

 

 

Cheers!

 

Lydecker

 

Thanks for posting this definition of character actor.  Note that in some ways a character actor isn't very versatile by definition ('they often play the same type').

 

So to me actors like Ward Bond and Thomas Mitchell (for example),  are not character actors since they were very versatle and they played all sorts of 'types',   while Eric Blore was (which makes his unusual role in The Shanghai Gesture all the more special).

 

Either way,  it would be great for TCM to have more tributes to character actors \ supporting players.     But the good news is that everyday TCM features these actors.   I assume one sees more of Ward Bond in any given month than most major stars (with the exception of the star featured in SOTM).

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Thanks for posting this definition of character actor.  Note that in some ways a character actor isn't very versatile by definition ('they often play the same type').

 

So to me actors like Ward Bond and Thomas Mitchell (for example),  are not character actors since they were very versatle and they played all sorts of 'types',   while Eric Blore was (which makes his unusual role in The Shanghai Gesture all the more special).

 

Either way,  it would be great for TCM to have more tributes to character actors \ supporting players.     But the good news is that everyday TCM features these actors.   I assume one sees more of Ward Bond in any given month than most major stars (with the exception of the star featured in SOTM).

I find it really interesting that you would not consider Ward Bond and Thomas Mitchell character actors because I absolutely believe they fall into that category.  Extremely versatile character actors, but, character actors nevertheless.  Now, Donald Meek, for instance, is also a character actor, but falls into that "always plays the same type of character" definition. Some character actors are just more talented and versatile than others.

 

This challenge has already started some interesting discussions about "what defines a character actor."  

 

Lydecker

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I find it really interesting that you would not consider Ward Bond and Thomas Mitchell character actors because I absolutely believe they fall into that category.  Extremely versatile character actors, but, character actors nevertheless.  Now, Donald Meek, for instance, is also a character actor, but falls into that "always plays the same type of character" definition. Some character actors are just more talented and versatile than others.

 

This challenge has already started some interesting discussions about "what defines a character actor."  

 

Lydecker

 

I meant that,  based on the definition posted,  one could say that Bond and Mitchell were not character actors, but instead just very versatile supporting actors.    

Again, based on the definition posted (especially the first sentence),  one could say a character actor can't be extremely versatile by definition.

 

Of course Bond and Mitchell were is so many movies that they played similar character 'types' in multiple movies,  but if one defines a character actor as one that played a similar character (or character persona),  in the majority of their films (which is how I read the definition),   they are not character actors.

 

But if Bond, Mitchell,  Blore,  Meeks, etc...  are all character actors,  what actors are only supporting actors?      

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I meant that,  based on the definition posted,  one could say that Bond and Mitchell were not character actors, but instead just very versatile supporting actors.    

Again, based on the definition posted (especially the first sentence),  one could say a character actor can't be a extremely versatile by definition.

 

Of course Bond and Mitchell were is so many movies that they played similar character 'types' in multiple movies,  but if one defines a character actor as one that played a similar character (or character persona),  in the majority of their films (which is how I read the definition),   they are not character actors.

 

But if Bond, Mitchell,  Blore,  Meeks, etc...  are all character actors,  what actors are only supporting actors?      

Well . . . the definition posted is not intended to be the end all, be all, of what a character actor is or isn't but I don't agree that the definition makes it seem as though they ALWAYS play exactly the same type of character.  It indicates they OFTEN play the same type of character but not always.  "character actor is a supporting actor skilled at playing distinctly unusual, interesting, or eccentric characters such that they often play the same "type" ("grande dame," busybody," "tough broad," "kindly old gentleman," etc. etc.) and play many, many roles convincingly and memorably." It says that while they often play the same type of character it also says they  "play many, many roles convincingly and memorably."  

 

In any case, it's clear that each of us have our own ideas about which actors are character actors!  It will interesting to see who "makes the cut" as SOTM/Character Actor in this challenge.

 

Lydecker

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Well . . . the definition posted is not intended to be the end all, be all, of what a character actor is or isn't but I don't agree that the definition makes it seem as though they ALWAYS play exactly the same type of character.  It indicates they OFTEN play the same type of character but not always.  "character actor is a supporting actor skilled at playing distinctly unusual, interesting, or eccentric characters such that they often play the same "type" ("grande dame," busybody," "tough broad," "kindly old gentleman," etc. etc.) and play many, many roles convincingly and memorably." It says that while they often play the same type of character it also says they  "play many, many roles convincingly and memorably."  

 

In any case, it's clear that each of us have our own ideas about which actors are character actors!  It will interesting to see who "makes the cut" as SOTM/Character Actor in this challenge.

 

Lydecker

 

Whoever said 'always'?   Instead I said ",,,in the majority of their films (which is how I read the definition),,,,".

 

I learned long ago that when one uses always,  they are always wrong.     ;)

 

It will be interesting to see who makes the cut, especially if there are some 'not the usual suspects' choices.

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Love, love, love Mary Wickes as your SOTM/What A Character Actor! AND your "Characters of 1930."

Kleptomaniacs  --  very cool.

 

Can't wait to see the rest.

 

Lydecker

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Ugh! I have two full days done only to realize I've been scheduling in my time zone (Pacific) instead of Eastern.  I was wondering why my evenings seemed so long.

 

Bah!

 

Stupid time zones. 

 

Off to rearrange...

 

Obrien, I like what you've got so far.  I like Mary Wickes.  She was hilarious in I Love Lucy as Lucy's frustrated ballet teacher.

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Obrienmundy:

 

You snagged Bugs Bunny for your animated GP first!  Excellent.  I'm sure he was top of mind for many folks for this challenge. He would definitely have been on my list.  (Who doesn't love a smart ****?)  Hope some other folks do this optional challenge.  I think it has interesting possibilities.

 

Lydecker

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Well, I now have Tuesday and Thursday done as well.  I was thinking of doing Bugs Bunny:  I was thinking of him as a James Cagney and Sweet Smell of Success fan.   Right now I'm divided between Alice in Wonderland and Chernabog the demon from Fantasia. 

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We have our first schedule!!!  And what a great one, obrienmundy.  Mary Wickes, Ronald Colman, Stanwyck & Capra, King Vidor, kleptomaniacs and more plus Bugs Bunny as your animated GP.  I love how his cartoons also appear throughout your schedule.  

 

Looking forward to seeing your program notes.

 

Lydecker

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Great schedule obrien.  It never ceases to amaze me how quickly you get your schedules posted.  I'm still trying to make sure I've properly converted my schedule from Pacific time to Eastern.  I really liked the Stanwyck and Wickes schedules.  I also like the underground Bette Davis films.  Bugs Bunny seems to be a popular choice.  I was also considering him and another character from Looney Tunes.  I like Bugs because he's a smart aleck and mean.  I guess I'll go with my second choice. 

 

For my Bugs Bunny, I was going to schedule It Happened One Night as Bugs Bunny's carrot munching was based on Clark Gable's from that film.  I was also going to schedule a Marx Brothers film like A Night at the Opera or Duck Soup as Bugs gets many of his gags from them.  Another film I was considering was Casablanca as Bugs Bunny starred in the remake: Carrotblanca.  I hadn't come up with my final film, I thought of Harvey, but I wasn't for sure on it.  Oh well... I have another character in mind and I think I won't have a problem coming up with another group of films.

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Well I have a complete schedule.  Whether it will be the complete schedule is open to question.  I may need to tweak it a little.  Or a lot.  Any Lyle Bettger fans should speak up now.

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Here's my schedule for the week of Sunday, November 15, 2015. Notes to follow shortly, but I think this is all fairly self-explanatory. My apologies for formatting issues. I created this schedule on three different computers, so it's formatted sort of like Frankenstein's monster

 

Sunday, November 15: Daytime

 

6:00AM         Love Finds Andy Hardy (1938) Mickey Rooney and Lewis Stone. Dir:                                    George B. Seitz. Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, 91 min.

 

7:45AM          Judge Hardy and Son (1939) Mickey Rooney and Lewis Stone. Dir:                             George B. Seitz. Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, 90 min.

 

9:30AM         Life Begins for Andy Hardy (1941) Mickey Rooney and Lewis Stone.                          Dir: George B. Seitz. Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, 102 min.

 

11:15AM         Andy Hardy’s Double Life (1942) Mickey Rooney and Lewis Stone.                             Dir: George B. Seitz. Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, 93 min.

 

1:00PM          Finian’s Rainbow (1968) Fred Astaire and Petula Clark. Dir: Francis                            Ford Coppola. Warner Bros.—Seven Arts, 145 min. P/S

 

3:30PM          El Dorado (1967) John Wayne and Robert Mitchum. Dir: Howard                                               Hawks. Paramount, 126 min. P/S

 

5:45PM          Witness for the Prosecution (1957) Tyrone Power and Marlene                                                Dietrich. Dir: Billy Wilder. United Artists, 116 min. P/S

 

Sunday, November 15: Primetime – Philip Glass Scores

 

8:00PM         The Truman Show (1998) Jim Carey and Laura Linney. Dir: Peter                                Weir. Paramount, 103 min. Premiere #1.

 

10:00PM       The Fog of War (2003) Robert McNamara. Dir: Errol Morris. Sony                                Pictures, 107 min. Premiere #2.

 

Sunday, November 15: Silent Sunday Night/TCM Imports

 

12:00AM       The Scarlet Letter (1927) Lillian Gish and Lars Hanson. Dir: Victor `                           Seastrom.  Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, 99 min.

 

1:45AM          Wild Strawberries (1957) Victor Seastrom and Ingrid Thulin. Dir:                                Ingmar Bergman. Janus Films, 91 min. P/S

 

3:30AM         Fanny and Alexander (1982) Pernilla Allwin and Bertil Guve. Dir:                              Ingmar Bergman. Gaumont, 188 min. P/S

 

 

 

Monday, November 16: Daytime – Starring Burgess Meredith

 

6:45AM          Idiot’s Delight (1939) Clark Gable and Burgess Meredith. Dir: Clarence                                    Brown. Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, 100 min.

 

8:30AM         Of Mice and Men (1939) Burgess Meredith and Lon Chaney, Jr. Dir:                             Lewis Milestone. United Artists, 104 min. P/S

 

10:30AM       Castle on the Hudson (1940) John Garfield and Burgess Meredith. Dir:                      Anatole Litvak. Warner Bros., 78 min.

 

12:00PM        Tom, Dick, and Harry (1941) Ginger Rogers and Burgess Meredith.                             Dir: Garson Kanin. RKO Radio Pictures, 87 min.

 

1:30PM          The Story of G.I. Joe (1945) Robert Mitchum and Burgess Meredith.                            Dir: William Wellman. United Artists, 108 min. P/S

 

3:30PM          The Diary of a Chambermaid (1946) Paulette Goddard and Burgess                          Meredith. Dir: Jean Renoir. United Artists, 86 min. P/S

 

5:00PM          Advise and Consent (1962) Henry Fonda and Burgess Meredith. Dir:                           Otto Preminger. Columbia Pictures, 139 min. P/S

 

7:30PM          Now Playing November (2015)

 

Monday, November 16: Primetime – Caesar’s Writers

 

8:00PM         My Favorite Year (1982) Peter O’Toole and Mark Linn-Baker. Dir:                              Richard Benjamin. Metro-            Goldwyn-Mayer, 93 min.

 

9:45PM          The Producers (1968) Gene Wilder and Zero Mostel. Dir: Mel Brooks.                          Embassy Pictures, 88 min. P/S

 

11:30PM        The Sunshine Boys (1975) Walter Matthau and George Burns. Dir:                               Herbert Ross. Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, 112 min.

 

1:30AM          The Thrill of It All (1963) Doris Day and James Garner. Dir: Norman                           Jewison. Universal Pictures, 108 min. P/S

 

3:30AM         Hannah and Her Sisters (1986) Michael Caine and Mia Farrow. Dir:                          Woody Allen. Orion Pictures, 107 min. P/S

 

5:30AM          Now Playing November (2015)

 

 

 

Tuesday, November 17: Daytime – Trains

 

6:00AM         The General (1926) Buster Keaton and Marion Mack. Dir: Buster                                               Keaton. United Artists, 75 min. P/S

 

7:30AM          Shanghai Express (1932) Marlene Dietrich and Clive Brook. Dir: Josef                                    von Sternberg. Paramount Pictures, 80 min. P/S

 

9:00AM         Twentieth Century (1934) John Barrymore and Carole Lombard. Dir:                                     Howard Hawks. Columbia Pictures, 91 min. P/S

 

10:45AM        The Lady Vanishes (1938) Margaret Lockwood and Michael Redgrave.                                    Dir: Alfred Hitchcock. United Artists, 97 min. P/S

 

12:30PM        Union Pacific (1939) Barbara Stanwyck and Joel McCrea. Dir: Cecile B.                                     DeMille. Paramount Pictures, 135 min. P/S

 

2:45PM          The Harvey Girls (1946) Judy Garland and John Hodiak. Dir: George                          Sidney. Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, 102 min.

 

4:30PM          The Narrow Margin (1952) Charles McGraw and Marie Windsor. Dir:                                     Richard Fleischer. RKO Pictures, 71 min.

 

5:45PM          Murder on the Orient Express (1974) Albert Finney and Lauren                                 Bacall. Dir: Sidney Lumet. EMI Films, 131 min. P/S

 

Tuesday, November 17: Primetime – Star of the Month: Hume Cronyn

 

8:00PM         The Postman Always Rings Twice (1946) John Garfield and Hume                           Cronyn. Dir: Tay Garnett. Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, 113 min.

 

10:00PM       Brute Force (1947) Burt Lancaster and Hume Cronyn. Dir: Jules Dassin.                                  Universal Pictures, 98 min. P/S

 

11:45PM         People Will Talk (1951) Cary Grant and Hume Cronyn. Dir: Joseph L.                           Mankiewicz. Twentieth-Century-Fox, 110 min. P/S

 

1:45AM          Sunrise at Campobello (1961) Ralph Bellamy and Hume Cronyn. Dir:                                     Vincent J. Donehue. Warner Bros., 144 min. P/S

 

4:15AM          The Beginning or the End (1947) Brian Donlevy and Hume Cronyn.                            Dir: Norman Taurog. Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, 112 min.

 

 

 

Wednesday, November 18: Daytime – Great Movie Characters from the 1950s

 

6:15AM          All About Eve (1950) Bette Davis and Anne Baxter. Dir: Joseph L.                                   Mankiewicz. Twentieth-Century-Fox, 138 min. P/S

 

8:45AM          The African Queen (1951) Humphrey Bogart and Katharine Hepburn.                          Dir: John Huston. United Artists, 106 min. P/S

 

10:45AM        Singin’ in the Rain (1952) Gene Kelly and Debbie Reynolds. Dir:                                                Stanley Donen. Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, 103 min.

 

12:30PM        How to Marry a Millionaire (1953) Marilyn Monroe and Lauren                               Bacall. Dir: Jean Negulesco. Twentieth-Century-Fox, 95 min. P/S

 

2:15PM           Marty (1955) Ernest Borgnine and Betsy Blair. Dir: Delbert Mann.                                              United Artists, 90 min. P/S

 

4:00PM         A Face in the Crowd (1957) Andy Griffith and Patricia Neal. Dir: Elia                            Kazan. Warner Bros., 126 min. P/S

 

6:15PM           12 Angry Men (1957) Henry Fonda and Lee J. Cobb. Dir: Sidney Lumet.                                    United Artists, 97 min. P/S

 

Wednesday, November 18: Primetime – Guest Programmer: Elmer Fudd

 

8:00PM         Trouble in Paradise (1932) Miriam Hopkins and Kay Francis. Dir:                                Ernst Lubitsch. Paramount Pictures, 83 min. P/S

 

9:30PM          The Palm Beach Story (1942) Claudette Colbert and Joel McCrea. Dir:                                    Preston Sturges. Paramount Pictures, 88 min. P/S

 

11:15PM         Moby Dick (1956) Gregory Peck and Richard Basehart. Dir: John                                                Huston. Warner Bros., 115 min. P/S

 

1:15AM           The Trouble with Harry (1955) Edmund Gwenn and John Forsythe.                          Dir: Alfred Hitchcock. Paramount Pictures, 100 min. P/S

 

3:15AM          Mr. and Mrs. Smith (1941) Carole Lombard and Robert Montgomery.                                     Dir: Alfred Hitchcock. RKO Pictures, 95 min. P/S      

 

5:00AM         The Dick Cavett Show: Alfred Hitchcock (1972) Dick Cavett and                               Alfred Hitchcock.

 

 

 

Thursday, November 19: Daytime – Samuel Goldwyn Productions

 

6:15AM          Dodsworth (1936) Walter Huston and Ruth Chatterton. Dir: William                            Wyler. Samuel Goldwyn Productions, 101 min. P/S

8:00AM         Dead End (1937) Sylvia Sidney and Joel McCrea. Dir: William Wyler.                             Samuel Goldwyn Productions, 93 min. P/S

 

9:45AM          Stella Dallas (1937) Barbara Stanwyck and Anne Shirley. Dir: King                                Vidor. Samuel Goldwyn Productions, 106 min. P/S

 

11:45AM         Wuthering Heights (1939) Merle Oberon and Laurence Olivier. Dir:                            William Wyler. Samuel Goldwyn Productions, 103 min. P/S

 

1:45PM           The Little Foxes (1941) Bette Davis and Herbert Marshall. Dir: William                                    Wyler. Samuel Goldwyn Productions, 115 min. P/S

 

3:45PM          The Pride of the Yankees (1942) Gary Cooper and Theresa Wright. Dir:                      Sam Wood. Samuel Goldwyn Productions, 128 min. P/S

 

6:00PM         The Secret Life of Walter Mitty (1947) Danny Kaye and Virginia                                 Mayo. Samuel Goldwyn Productions, 110 min. P/S

 

Thursday, November 19: Primetime – Ancient Rome

 

8:00PM         Spartacus (1960) Kirk Douglas and Laurence Olivier. Dir: Stanley                                  Kubrick. Universal Pictures, 184 min. P/S

 

11:15PM         Gladiator (2000) Russell Crowe and Richard Harris. Dir: Ridley Scott.                          Universal Pictures, 155 min. P/S

 

2:00AM         Julius Caesar (1953) Marlon Brando and James Mason. Dir: Joseph L.                                     Mankiewicz. Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, 121 min.

 

4:15AM          A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum (1966) Phil                            Silvers and Zero Mostel. Dir: Richard Lester. United Artists, 99 min. P/S

 

 

 

Friday, November 20: Daytime – The Other Master of Suspense

 

6:00AM         Le Corbeau (1943) Pierre Fresnay and Pierre Larquey. Dir: Henri-                                              Georges Clouzot. Tobis Films, 92 min. P/S

 

7:45AM          The Murderer Lives at Number 21 (1947) Suzy Delair and Pierre                               Fresnay. Dir: Henri-Georges Clouzot. Continental Films, 84 min. P/S

 

9:15AM          Quai des Orfèvres (1947) Louis Jouvet and Suzy Delair. Dir: Henri-                              Georges Clouzot.  Coronis, 106 min. Premiere #3

 

11:15AM         Manon (1949) Serge Reggiani and Michel Auclair. Dir: Henri-Georges                            Clouzot. Alcina, 100 min. Premiere #4

 

1:00PM          The Wages of Fear (1953) Yves Montand and Charles Vanel. Dir: Henri-Georges Clouzot. CICC, 131 min. P/S

 

3:15PM           Diabolique (1955) Simone Signoret and Vera Clouzot. Dir: Henri-Georges Clouzot. Cinédis, 116 min. P/S

 

5:15PM           The Mystery of Picasso (1955) Pablo Picasso and Claude Renoir. Dir: Henri-Georges Clouzot. Filmsonor, 78 min. P/S

 

6:45PM          The Dick Cavett Show: Alfred Hitchcock (1972) Dick Cavett and                               Alfred Hitchcock.

 

Friday, November 20: Primetime – Friday Night Spotlight: Female Directors

 

8:00PM         The Bigamist (1953) Joan Fontaine and Edmund Gwenn. Dir: Ida                                  Lupino. Filmmakers Productions, 80 min. P/S

 

9:30PM          The Hitch-Hiker (1953) Edmond O’Brien and William Talman. Dir: Ida                                   Lupino. RKO Pictures, 71 min.

 

11:00PM        The Piano (1993) Holly Hunter and Sam Neill. Dir: Jane Campion.                                  Miramax Films, 120 min. P/S

 

1:15AM           An Angel At My Table (1990) Kerry Fox and Karen Fergusson. Dir:                              Jane Campion. Fine Line Features, 157 min. P/S

 

4:15AM          The Trouble with Angels (1966) Rosalind Russell and Binnie Barnes.                          Dir: Ida Lupino. Columbia Pictures, 112 min. P/S

 

 

 

Saturday, November 21: Daytime

 

6:15AM          Born to Kill (1947) Claire Trevor and Lawrence Tierney. Dir: Robert                              Wise. RKO Pictures, 92 min.

 

8:00AM         Three Little Words (1950) Fred Astaire and Red Skelton. Dir: Richard                                     Thorpe. Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, 103 min.

 

10:00AM       The Cheyenne Social Club (1970) James Stewart and Henry Fonda.                             Dir: Gene Kelly. National General Pictures, 103 min. P/S

 

12:00PM        Broadway Melody of 1936 (1935) Jack Benny and Eleanor Powell.                              Dir: Roy Del Ruth. Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, 102 min.

 

2:00PM         Broadway Melody of 1938 (1937) Robert Taylor and Eleanor Powell.                                     Dir: Roy Del Ruth. Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, 110 min.

 

4:00PM         Broadway Melody of 1940 (1940) Fred Astaire and Eleanor Powell.                           Dir: Norman Taurog. Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, 102 min.

 

6:00PM         Born to Dance (1936) Eleanor Powell and James Stewart. Dir: Roy Del                                     Ruth. Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, 108 min.

 

Saturday, November 21: Primetime – The Essentials: Acting Piano Players

 

8:00PM         The Best Years of Our Lives (1946) Myrna Loy and Fredric March.                              Dir: William Wyler. Samuel Goldwyn Productions, 172 min. P/S

 

11:00PM        An American in Paris (1951) Gene Kelly and Leslie Caron. Dir:                                      Vincente Minnelli. Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, 115 min.

 

1:00AM          To Have and Have Not (1944) Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall.                           Dir: Howard Hawks. Warner Bros., 100 min.

 

Saturday, November 21: Late Night – TCM Underground

 

2:45AM          Flesh Feast (1970) Veronica Lake and Phil Philbin. Dir: Brad F. Grinter.                                   Viking International, 72 min. P/S

 

4:15AM          Trog (1970) Joan Crawford and Michael Gough. Dir: Freddie Francis.                              Warner Bros., 91 min. P/S

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Yes, I concur.  Great schedule, Barton Keyes.  So glad someone chose Hume Cronyn --  I was hoping someone would honor him and I love your 1950's Incredible Characters along with the Clouzot films.

Goldwyn, Burgess Meredith, Andy Hardy and Elmer Fudd.  What's not to like?  Looking forward to your programming notes.

 

Lydecker

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Great schedule Barton! I love the piano players and Elmer Fudd.  Is it weird that I was also considering a train theme? I haven't written it yet though; so I may go another direction.  It seems in my schedules, I apparently need to have an ode to some form of transportation.  Last time around, it was airplanes.  Oh well... there are other modes of transportation to consider.

 

While I've heard of Hume Cronyn and seen his name in some cast lists, I don't think I'm at the point where I'd be able to pick him out of a film.  I'd still need to know what character he is.  However, I would definitely watch the films scheduled featuring Cronyn. 

 

 

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Two fantastic schedules packed with films I love! So glad to see Mary Wickes and Hume Cronyn being chosen--seriously, two of my all-time favorites who were in a ton of my favorite movies!

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(How I miss those Now Playing covers we used to get for these challenges)

 

Great schedule, obrien, and great choices of people to feature. Bugs is a natural guest programmer. And I love scheduling a whole day of other character actors because there are so many great ones to choose from. I'm having trouble picking just one, so this helps me narrow it down. I kinda wish I knew who eeryone else was picking so I could narrow it down.

 

Also, Barton Keyes, love the piano players and the movies by Sid Caesar's writing staff. What a talented bunch. Elmer Fudd's films are so interesting. Can't wait to see why you think Fudd picked those particular films, although I think I can see the connection with TROUBLE WITH HARRY (hunting) and MOBY DICK (whale=wabbit).

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