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slaytonf

That's a nice car!

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A long-dead relative of mine owned a very rare Cord and that car it is today owned by jay leno. :)

my grandmother use to drive around in a packard. :)

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Dargo old buddy, I have to disagree with you about the car in VANISHING POINT that is actually used for  the final crash scene, it is most definitely a Camaro. For a split second before the impact you can vaguely make out the side and back of the car, the rear quarters have that big rounded Camaro hump and the taillights are visible. At the very end of the film (your youtube clip doesn't go quite far enough) they show the wrecked back half of the car (Camaro) and about one second before the film credits start rolling you can actually see a Camaro nameplate on the twisted wreck.  So this is not a myth or wishful thinking by the MoPar fans out there (of which I am a proud member) ;)  

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Wasn't there a movie starring Glenn Ford in which he played some sort of military officer that won a car in some sweepstakes, and the producers used the BOBBY DARIN DREAM CAR, the one featured on the cans of GLASS WAX for years?

 

 

Sepiatone

Sepiatone, the car that you are referring to is the famed Lincoln Futura show car of the 50's.  That same car years later would be permanently modified by George Barris to become the tv Batmobile.  That car recently sold at auction for a cool 4.2 million bucks. (There were several clone cars made during the tv series days , used for certain scenes and also as show cars for the public)

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I was reminded of this thread last night when I was watching "Terminator II - Judgement Day" on my LD when the T-1000 told the officer That's a nice bike".

 

Nice enough to kill for, lol

 

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Sepiatone, the car that you are referring to is the famed Lincoln Futura show car of the 50's.  That same car years later would be permanently modified by George Barris to become the tv Batmobile.  That car recently sold at auction for a cool 4.2 million bucks. (There were several clone cars made during the tv series days , used for certain scenes and also as show cars for the public)

 

This it?:

 

1955%20Lincoln%20Futura%20Concept%20Car%

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There was a real gas turbine car that didn't got off the ground, the 1963 Chysler Turbine. Jay Leno owns one.

 

1963_chrysler_turbine.jpg

 

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turbine-gen3.gif\\

 

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Dargo, as any MoPar fan is pleased to say the car that is crashed into the bulldozer at the end of Vanishing Point was actually a first gen 67-69 Camaro. Its true and you can plainly see by slow mo freeze framing the scene.

Another movie ruined (for me) by nit-pickers.

 I actually saw this Vanishing Point while my '71 Challenger was in the parking lot.  I pulled my DVD and watched it in slow motion, reverse slow motion and step on two different TV's.  The car speeding toward the bulldozers is definitely a '70 Dodge Challengerthe headlights, grille and grille insert confirm this.  Newman's view of bulldozers over the steering wheel is definitely from a Challenger. The one actually crashing into the bulldozers and seen from the rear could be a Camaro.  I may pull out some classic car magazines and books and see if I can match it - or not.  The one on the tow truck probably is a Camaro as well as I definitely saw the Camaro badge on the one on the tow truck.  Upside down and fleeting.  Of course, maybe a junked Camaro just looked better than whatever was actually left of the car that crashed into the bulldozers.  It would seem that from the scenes, the one on the truck would have had a lot more fire damage to the exterior.

There were a lot of similarities between the Camaro and the Challenger from the side.

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There were a lot of similarities between the Camaro and the Challenger from the side.

 

Yep, with the primary difference probably being the kicked up belt-line just forward of the rear wheel well on the Dodge.

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Cid, you would definitely like the car used in the last Martin and Lewis film, HOLLYWOOD OR BUST.  A brand new red 56 Chrysler New Yorker conv.

Thanks MRROBERTS.  May have to watch it just for the car.  Really never cared for Jerry Lewis, but I do like Dean Martin.

As for cars, anything made by Chrysler Corp. between 56 and 59 looked great.  Well, maybe not the Dodges so much.

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...As for cars, anything made by Chrysler Corp. between 56 and 59 looked great.  Well, maybe not the Dodges so much.

 

Known as Chrysler's "Forward Look", and courtesy their chief stylist at the time, Virgil Exner.

 

(...my favorite of the time being the 1957-58 DeSoto model line)

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(...my favorite of the time being the 1957-58 DeSoto model line)

Actually I greatly admire the De Soto's of the late '50's, probably because I lived in a small town and there were none-just a Chrysler-Plymouth dealer and the GM and Ford guys.  So, De Soto sounds exotic.  Although, I think the Chryslers were a little more restrained and conservative, especially when it came to "bumper guards."  After the '56 Chrysler, I think the '59 De Soto was best looking.

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Actually I greatly admire the De Soto's of the late '50's, probably because I lived in a small town and there were none-just a Chrysler-Plymouth dealer and the GM and Ford guys.  So, De Soto sounds exotic.  Although, I think the Chryslers were a little more restrained and conservative, especially when it came to "bumper guards."  After the '56 Chrysler, I think the '59 De Soto was best looking.

 

Yeah, I'd guess the word "exotic" might be as good as any to describe the DeSotos, and even through Groucho would do his best to promote them on his old game show.

 

Saaaay, I wonder if that is why that line might have been one of the first to have been dropped by any of the Big Three? They were somehow deemed too "exotic" by the public?

 

(...excluding the ill-fated and short-lived Edsel line by FoMoCo anyway, and which I believe ceased production just about the same time)

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The general U S economy , and all car sales,  really tanked in 1958. The cars in the "middle price" class  did the worst ; Edsel had the miss fortune of coming out right at the worst time and the De Soto was Chrysler's weak sister in sales. The sales sank so low it was no longer economically  viable to keep those cars in production.  Edsel died in the fall of 1959 (with a very short run of 1960 models) and De Soto died one year later (fall of 1960 with a short run of 1961 production).  GM was always the biggest company of all so they could maintain production of all 3 of their middle priced cars (Pontiac, Olds, and Buick).  By the early 60's the economy, and car sales recovered to healthy levels.  If I had a Jay Leno type garage, with income to match of course, I would have a  bunch of mid - late 50's Chrysler cars especially the 1957 models.

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Yeah, I'd guess the word "exotic" might be as good as any to describe the DeSotos, and even through Groucho would do his best to promote them on his old game show.

 

Saaaay, I wonder if that is why that line might have been one of the first to have been dropped by any of the Big Three? They were somehow deemed too "exotic" by the public?

 

(...excluding the ill-fated and short-lived Edsel line by FoMoCo anyway, and which I believe ceased production just about the same time)

I meant I prefer '58 rather than '59 De Soto in earlier post with '59 being second choice for a De Soto.

Regardless, I can actually watch You Bet Your Life six times a week and sometimes the station leaves in the De Soto ads.  Of course, always had to go to your Plymouth-De Soto dealer to get a De Soto, if you had one.

From my readings, De Soto was killed by Chrysler policy of lowering price of some Chryslers (Windsor) and raising some Dodges into De Soto content levels, but at Dodge prices.  So, why get a De Soto when you can get a comparably equipped Chrysler for about same price or why get a De Soto when you can get a comparably equipped Dodge for less money?  In fact, at the end, the De Soto Firesweep was mostly a Dodge with De Soto trim.  Front end was a slightly altered Dodge one. 

With Chrysler's much smaller overall sales compared to GM and Ford, they couldn't spread costs across makes as easily.  Also, even in my small town, there was a dealer for every GM product although each sold two makes, e.g. Chevrolet-Oldsmobile.  Buick dealer was allowed to also sell Ramblers.

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I meant I prefer '58 rather than '59 De Soto in earlier post with '59 being second choice for a De Soto.

Regardless, I can actually watch You Bet Your Life six times a week and sometimes the station leaves in the De Soto ads.  Of course, always had to go to your Plymouth-De Soto dealer to get a De Soto, if you had one.

From my readings, De Soto was killed by Chrysler policy of lowering price of some Chryslers (Windsor) and raising some Dodges into De Soto content levels, but at Dodge prices.  So, why get a De Soto when you can get a comparably equipped Chrysler for about same price or why get a De Soto when you can get a comparably equipped Dodge for less money?  In fact, at the end, the De Soto Firesweep was mostly a Dodge with De Soto trim.  Front end was a slightly altered Dodge one. 

With Chrysler's much smaller overall sales compared to GM and Ford, they couldn't spread costs across makes as easily.  Also, even in my small town, there was a dealer for every GM product although each sold two makes, e.g. Chevrolet-Oldsmobile.  Buick dealer was allowed to also sell Ramblers.

 

Any De Sotos that are memorable to you from movies?

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Any De Sotos that are memorable to you from movies?

I'll have to think about it some more, but some come to mind.  Andy Griffith had a '59 De Soto Firedome Sportsman hardtop coupe in The Girl in the Empty Grave and Deadly Game.  He referred to it as a '57, but it's a '59.  Jimmy Stewart has a De Soto in Vertigo.  I think it is a '56 Firedome Sportsman, but not sure.  Been a while since I saw it and do not have a copy of the movie.  There is also a late '50's De Soto convertible in Monster on the Campus, SciFi made in 1958.

Bob Hope's Bachelor in Paradise, made in '61, has a lot of Chrysler products, but don't reall if any are De Sotos.  Several Chryslers, Plymouths and Dodges.  Good excuse to watch it again.

One question I have had for a long time is why were there so many Chrysler products in movies and TV shows from the '50's and '60's?  Did Chrysler have more of an initiative than GM or Ford for product placement? 

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Geez......I remember a buddy of mine got ahold of a '55 DeSoto and we spent the summer of '67, through the Detroit riot, and beyond, replacing most of the rotted metal with BOND-O.  Sadly, when he finally got it on the road in Sept. '67, some old lady in an Oldsmobile "landboat" cut him off, and he smacked the right front fender into a fire hydrant.  Screwed up the "A" frame, which couldn't be found ANYwhere, and eventually, he had to dump it!  A whole summer's work down the drain.........

 

 

Sepiatone

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In THE STRANGE LOVE OF MARTHA IVERS Van Heflin is driving a  42 De Soto and he cracks up wrecking the front end. Easy to identify the car, the 42 model had the hidden headlights.  The movie was made in 46' so it seems strange that the car used was so new (remember no cars made during the war years).  And as for De Sotos think of all of the cabs used in the movies 30's, 40's , and 50's. De Sotos were very popular  as cabs.  In the real good noir film SIDE STREET starring Farley Granger there is a great chase scene at the end of the film with a 40's De Soto cab.

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One of my all time favorite tv shows from when I was a kid and right to the present day is Broderick Crawford's HIGHWAY PATROL (currently on THIS Tv  early in the morning).  Made from 1955 to 1959 the show is a great look back at the cars and general scenery location shooting of the period. The stories themselves are very good, fast paced, concise. Like any tv/movie you allow a little for stretching reality but the shows are based on actual case incidents and presented as such (just like Jack Webb's DRAGNET) . The cars used in HIGHWAY PATROL are "clones" of cars used by the actual California Highway Patrol for each year of the show. You can tell that the show budget was rather limited, many civilian cars are used  in multiple episodes  (there's an early 50's Ford convertible that shows up a lot).  And as for the cop cars, you rarely see more then 2 cars at a time. Different cops can appear in an episode but its obvious they are driving the same car.  Of course my favorite episodes involve the 56 thru 59 Dodges (the 57's my favorite). One really good episode involved  thieves with one character masquerading as a  cop in a fake police car.  At the end Brod catches the bad guys and reveals a show secret, the cop cars are black sedans with white decal door panels that just peal off.

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Geez......I remember a buddy of mine got ahold of a '55 DeSoto and we spent the summer of '67, through the Detroit riot, and beyond, replacing most of the rotted metal with BOND-O.  

Chrysler products were infamous for rust in the mid to late '50's.  There were no  inside wheel well  covers so all the mud, water and road salt was thrown up into those tall tail fins, as well as other parts of the cars.  One of reasons why they are so rare today, at least in good shape.

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One of my all time favorite tv shows from when I was a kid and right to the present day is Broderick Crawford's HIGHWAY PATROL (currently on THIS Tv  early in the morning).  Made from 1955 to 1959 the show is a great look back at the cars and general scenery location shooting of the period. The stories themselves are very good, fast paced, concise. Like any tv/movie you allow a little for stretching reality but the shows are based on actual case incidents and presented as such (just like Jack Webb's DRAGNET) . The cars used in HIGHWAY PATROL are "clones" of cars used by the actual California Highway Patrol for each year of the show. You can tell that the show budget was rather limited, many civilian cars are used  in multiple episodes  (there's an early 50's Ford convertible that shows up a lot).  And as for the cop cars, you rarely see more then 2 cars at a time. Different cops can appear in an episode but its obvious they are driving the same car.  Of course my favorite episodes involve the 56 thru 59 Dodges (the 57's my favorite). One really good episode involved  thieves with one character masquerading as a  cop in a fake police car.  At the end Brod catches the bad guys and reveals a show secret, the cop cars are black sedans with white decal door panels that just peal off.

Also, one of our favorites - even bought the DVD set.  Whenever I read an article in a collector car magazine about great the cars rode, how smooth and comfortable, etc., I just pull out a Highway Patrol DVD and watch the cars bounce up and down, especially when stopping or taking off.  The rolling from side to side around curves is educational also.

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Chrysler products were infamous for rust in the mid to late '50's.  There were no  inside wheel well  covers so all the mud, water and road salt was thrown up into those tall tail fins, as well as other parts of the cars.  One of reasons why they are so rare today, at least in good shape.

 

Excuse me here Cid, but what exactly is "road salt"???

 

(...kiddingly asks the native Angeleno...and thus of course the very reason any classic car collector usually looks for a vehicle which has spent most of its life in the American Southwest)

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