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acraven

February Schedule Is Up

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I'm very much looking foward to RUNNING ON EMPTY and THE GREAT SANTINI.

 

River Phoenix was nominated for a Best Supporting Actor Oscar for RUNNING ON EMPTY  even though he has the lead role in the movie. 

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I know that the Oscar scheduling is unpopular here; but there are a ton of movies scheduled that I'd like to see-- including Irma La Douce which we were discussing on the Billy Wilder thread.  Hopefully I'll have TCM back by then.

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I'm very much looking foward to RUNNING ON EMPTY and THE GREAT SANTINI.

 

River Phoenix was nominated for a Best Supporting Actor Oscar for RUNNING ON EMPTY  even though he has the lead role in the movie. 

Whoa boy. More modern day classics. Where's FredCDobbs when you need him.  Fred-- Fred-- pick up, please...

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The February 2015 schedule is available here: 

http://www.tcm.com/schedule/monthly.html?tz=est&sdate=2015-2-01

 

It's heavy on repeats, as always for February, but I'm very glad for an opportunity to catch these movies on TV in uncut form:

 

Deliverance

Barry Lyndon

The Great Santini

The Emigrants

Running on Empty

The Fisher King 

Right-- this is what's happening. The usual suspects from the golden age of Hollywood with a smattering of films from the 70s-2000s (so somethng new is being offered). What about something 'new' from the golden age???

 

There's a reason why loyal viewers (some, all, a few-- pick your favorite modifier) mutiny against the 31 Days of Oscar. Last year, Molly Haskell made a public statement criticizing the channel for this type of programming.

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The most recent film on the 2015 31 Days of Oscar schedule is THE KING'S SPEECH (2010). NO COUNTRY FOR OLD MEN (2007) and THE QUEEN (2006) are the runners-up for that title. All three will air on March 1.

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The most recent film on the 2015 31 Days of Oscar schedule is THE KING'S SPEECH (2010). NO COUNTRY FOR OLD MEN (2007) and THE QUEEN (2006) are the runners-up for that title. All three will air on March 1.

Correction-- they will air on March 3. On March 1, we have CHICAGO from 2002. On March 2, it's the Lord of the Rings trilogy from 2001, 2002 and 2003.

 

Next year we will get the Hobbit movies from the 2010's. And then we will be getting films that are not yet released-- because you know, they're classics and future Oscar material!

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Way way way way way tooooooooooo many post-code movies on this schedule. Thumbs down.

 

This is not your grandma's TCM anymore.

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These are what I THINK will be TCM premieres.  Any I missed or listed incorrectly?  I'm sure there are.

 

The Sand Pebbles

 

Weary River

 

Deliverance

 

10

 

Fame

 

The Emigrants

 

China Syndrome

 

The English Patient

 

Life Is Beautiful

 

Chicago

 

Lord of the Rings

 

The Artist

 

The King's Speech

 

No Country For Old Men

 

The Queen

 

(My fantasy would be substituting The Godfather trilogy for Lord of the Rings.)

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These are what I THINK will be TCM premieres.  Any I missed or listed incorrectly?  I'm sure there are.

 

The Sand Pebbles

Weary River

Deliverance

10

Fame

The Emigrants

China Syndrome

The English Patient

Life Is Beautiful

Chicago

Lord of the Rings

The Artist

The King's Speech

No Country For Old Men

The Queen

 

 

WEARY RIVER has aired before. Notice how none of those other titles are from the golden age of Hollywood. There are still a lot of Oscar-nominated films from Universal, Paramount and Republic that TCM doesn't seem willing to broadcast. We're losing the traditional meaning of 'classic film' because TCM is obviously chasing after younger demographics (though the apologists will lose sleep over my saying that).

imgres30.jpg

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THE CHINA SYNDROME (1979) is not a premiere. It most recently aired on Jane Fonda's Summer Under the Stars day this past August.

 

THE ENGLISH PATIENT (1996) will not be a premiere either. That film first aired last week during the Friday Night Spotlight on Africa.

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Thanks to everyone for the replies and the corrections to my list.  I'm really looking forward to Deliverance and The Emigrants. I'd love at some point to see the equally fine sequel to that last film, The New Land.

 

All in all I can't get too fired up about the selection, but if I were new to TCM I'd be in seventh heaven.  At this point all I get really excited about are the TCM premieres, no matter what era they're from.

 

 

Pick it, boy!

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WEARY RIVER has aired before. Notice how none of those other titles are from the golden age of Hollywood. There are still a lot of Oscar-nominated films from Universal, Paramount and Republic that TCM doesn't seem willing to broadcast. We're losing the traditional meaning of 'classic film' because TCM is obviously chasing after younger demographics (though the apologists will lose sleep over my saying that).

imgres30.jpg

I agree.  TCM, like so many networks, is obsessed with younger demos despite the fact that all the research shows that it is the Baby Boomers who still do the most purchasing. Makes me crazy.  I'd love to see some of those 1930's and 1940's Oscar nominees/winners that we haven't seen already (and seen endlessly.)  Having said that, I'm glad to see RUNNING ON EMPTY, THE ARTIST and THE KING'S SPEECH make the cut for the annual "31 Days" ritual.  Normally, I record a ton prior to February and spend most of that month playing those films back and watching practically nothing live.

 

Lydecker

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I agree.  TCM, like so many networks, is obsessed with younger demos 

 

Lydecker

Right-- it's sad. The honeymoon is over. It's time for loyal viewers to see that there is trouble in paradise.

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All in all I can't get too fired up about the selection, but if I were new to TCM I'd be in seventh heaven.  At this point all I get really excited about are the TCM premieres, no matter what era they're from.

 

Guess you're one of the rare "loyal viewers" who isn't stuck in the rut of wanting to watch the same old creaky formulae over and over and over.

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Personally I find Oscar month to be boring. I already have taped whatever Oscar-nominated movies

I enjoy. I'll use that month for catching up on my taped movies.

However I do understand the need to bring a wider audience to TCM by showing Oscar nominated movies for one month each year.

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So TCM is  going to be showing Chicago, No Country for Old Men, The King's Speech and The Artist.  How long do you think it will take for them to show The Pianist, There will be Blood, The Social Network or The Tree of Life?

 

What academy award nominees from the Oscars' first three decades has TCM not shown?

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So TCM is  going to be showing Chicago, No Country for Old Men, The King's Speech and The Artist.  How long do you think it will take for them to show The Pianist, There will be Blood, The Social Network or The Tree of Life?

 

What academy award nominees from the Oscars' first three decades has TCM not shown?

Maybe TCM doesn't have the rights to air some of the movies from 1929-59?  I don't know how their programming department works and under what restrictions and licenses they have to deal with, but I always look forward to 31 Days of Oscar.  I'm not able to record missed programs, so if something is showing in a decent time slot for me, I'll watch it, if I find it interesting.  I've never seen "The King's Speech" or "The Artist", and I did like "No Country for Old Men".  I've always liked "Deliverance" and have not seen it for several years--just hope they don't edit out any scenes or language.

 

I was in college the first time I ever saw "Remember The Night".  I really liked the movie, and about 22 years later, I was finally able to get TCM on my cable system, I had to wait several more years before it was ever shown on the station.  Since it first aired on TCM, it seems to be a staple in their December rotation, which is appropriate.  I think it's a very underrated film.

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What academy award nominees from the Oscars' first three decades has TCM not shown?

I don't think they've shown Emil Jannings' win for The Way of All Flesh before. ;)

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Guess you're one of the rare "loyal viewers" who isn't stuck in the rut of wanting to watch the same old creaky formulae over and over and over.

 

When I had my book shop, the thrill was always going into a private library and seeing a mix of titles I knew were perennial sellers (the Faulkners and the Langston Hugheses, etc.) along with books I only got to buy maybe once a year:  Early Orwell; Paul Carell's Eastern Front histories; Cartier-Bresson's The Decisive Moment; etc.

 

I would have loved to have gone into a house and found nothing but books from that latter category, but as a realist I knew that wasn't going to happen.  The strategy was to turn away the junk, keep buying the better quality perennials, and have plenty of cash reserve to buy those collectors' items whenever they were offered.

 

Similarly, with TCM I'd love to have month after month of half a dozen TCM premieres a day, with the entire Criterion Collection shown straight through in all its glory and the entire Paramount and Monogram film libraries at my beck and call.  I also know that this isn't going to happen, either. 

 

But even now, after having recorded every first rate movie that looked the slightest bit interesting to me for the past 5+ years, I'm still finding at least a dozen or so movies every month that I'd never had before and which prove to be pleasant surprises.  Even Oscar month looks like it'll give me a good half dozen, as well as scores of movies that might be worth a second or third watching.  If this was my worst problem in life, I wouldn't have much to complain about.

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When I had my book shop, the thrill was always going into a private library and seeing a mix of titles I knew were perennial sellers (the Faulkners and the Langston Hugheses, etc.) along with books I only got to buy maybe once a year:  Early Orwell; Paul Carell's Eastern Front histories; Cartier-Bresson's The Decisive Moment; etc.

 

I would have loved to have gone into a house and found nothing but books from that latter category, but as a realist I knew that wasn't going to happen.  The strategy was to turn away the junk, keep buying the better quality perennials, and have plenty of cash reserve to buy those collectors' items whenever they were offered.

 

Similarly, with TCM I'd love to have month after month of half a dozen TCM premieres a day, with the entire Criterion Collection shown straight through in all its glory and the entire Paramount and Monogram film libraries at my beck and call.  I also know that this isn't going to happen, either. 

 

But even now, after having recorded every first rate movie that looked the slightest bit interesting to me for the past 5+ years, I'm still finding at least a dozen or so movies every month that I'd never had before and which prove to be pleasant surprises.  Even Oscar month looks like it'll give me a good half dozen, as well as scores of movies that might be worth a second or third watching.  If this was my worst problem in life, I wouldn't have much to complain about.

 

I too record movies to dvd's every month. But there's rarely a dozen. My first preference is to use actual commercial dvd's as my sources, though - and that means bypassing many TCM opportunities. I like to record the commentaries and extras as well as the films themselves, you see - and I like to have a clean copy (no network badges on the screen).

 

But TCM can be (is) a good source for some hard-to-find-on-dvd titles (for me, with a limited budget and transportation difficulties), and I accept those opportunities with gratitude.

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Way way way way way tooooooooooo many post-code movies on this schedule. Thumbs down.

 

This is not your grandma's TCM anymore.

And never will be again.

 

With a very few exceptions, it's an entire month I can ignore TCM.

 

And so it goes.

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But even now, after having recorded every first rate movie that looked the slightest bit interesting to me for the past 5+ years, I'm still finding at least a dozen or so movies every month that I'd never had before and which prove to be pleasant surprises. 

Yes-- we call them the rarities. These are usually the non-Turner Library films that people get excited about when the schedules are announced. As the budget cuts continue, we can expect there may be less of these rarities in future months-- with more repeats of the usual suspects from the Turner Library. Ultimately, you have to ask yourself is TCM worth the six to ten new titles you can pick up per month by making your own DVD recording...or is it better to put the money spent on cable towards purchasing rarities in Blu-Ray that often have extras and probably will last longer...?

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We're losing the traditional meaning of 'classic film' because TCM is obviously chasing after younger demographics (though the apologists will lose sleep over my saying that).

 

I hope no one is losing sleep over anything posted on these message boards. 

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