TopBilled

Today's topic

1,575 posts in this topic

There HAVE been imes when a critic I respect gave a new movie a bad review, and it caused me to NOT go and see that movie, but RARELY if EVER had they changed my mind about a movie I already saw and formed a favorable opinion of.  Same with music.

 

There was a music critic in the Detroit Free Press named JOHN GUINN.  And I respected his opinions a lot when it came to reviewing DSO concerts, or new classical music recordings.

 

However, one of MY favorite orchestral works is Debussy's "La Mer".  Guinn, however, HATES this piece of music no end.  yet, HIS bad opinion of it, and his explanation of WHY failed to shake my love of this work.

 

 

Sepiatone

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't change my viewpoint of a film given the reviews of others, but I have noticed people voting down well written reviews on imdb, probably because they did not agree with the review. So I have noticed the reverse - people letting their opinion of a film effect their opinion of a review! I can give you concrete examples if you want TB, but that would probably be hijacking your thread.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Reviewers seldom change my views about a movie, but movies can sometimes form my views about a reviewer.

 

Best example:  Pauline's Kael's orgastic review of Last Tango in Paris didn't alter my opinion of that pathetic piece of buttered trash, but it certainly made me question Pauline Kael's sanity.  She often wrote beautifully, but I never paid the slightest bit of attention to her recommendations after that one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OIKS---I thought you meant movies that stars liked most.  NOT necesarily their OWN, but movies THEY really liked---as moviegoers---

 

 

Sepiatone

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Stars' own favorite films

 

images-122.jpg

Lana Turner said the role she most enjoyed playing was Cora in THE POSTMAN ALWAYS RINGS TWICE.

 

images28.jpg

Robert Mitchum thought his best screen work was in HEAVEN KNOWS, MR. ALISON.

 

imgres58.jpg

Merle Oberon said she had the most fun making THAT UNCERTAIN FEELING for Ernst Lubitsch.

 

imgres-119.jpg

Doris Day has cited CALAMITY JANE as her best motion picture.

Kirk Douglas's was LONELY ARE THE BRAVE. Bette Davis's  (With respect to her own performance) was DARK VICTORY.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've long felt that the conversation Bogey and Bacall have purportedly about "race horses" in that bar in "The Big Sleep" was one of the most suggestive and cleverly "double entendred" conversations ever filmed.  (Oh, SURE Betty----"Depends on who's in the SADDLE!"  And WHICH "saddle" would that BE?)

 

 

Sepiatone

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would say most of The Lady Eve and The Palm Beach Story got completely by the censors.  The snake scene in The Lady Eve, and the train scene where "Eve" relates all her past romantic experience (with the train going through the tunnel) --- how did Sturges even get away with that?  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My vote would go to "The Adventures of Robin Hood." The Technicolor in that film is gorgeous. Combine the bright sets with the beautiful brightly colored costumes, and you have a visual treat for the eyes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think some of the muted and "natural" richness seen in THE GODFATHER is a very good example of this proccess's range and versitality.  In many ways, one could argue that all, GWTW, Robin, and MMISL seem TOO colorful than how it would all REALLY look.  IF you get my drift...

 

It's all a matter of taste, I suppose.  For example, Cardiff's films look TOO HARSH to me.

 

 

Sepiatone

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My vote would go to "The Adventures of Robin Hood." The Technicolor in that film is gorgeous. Combine the bright sets with the beautiful brightly colored costumes, and you have a visual treat for the eyes.

 

Yeah, and not to mention bringing out the flesh tones of the actor playing the lead in that movie, eh Speedy?! ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My pick would be the use of the Technicolor in SINGIN' IN THE RAIN, and especially perhaps in the "Beautiful Girl" and "Broadway Melody" segments.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For me by far the best early technicolor was in the Walt Disney cartoons.  No live action movie back then was even close.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The use of color in Black Narcissus is about as good as it gets. If you ever get the chance to see it on the big screen, don't miss it.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The use of color in Black Narcissus is about as good as it gets. If you ever get the chance to see it on the big screen, don't miss it.

 

Well heck, kingrat. For THAT matter, almost EVERY movie in which Cardiff was behind the Technicolor camera is either a masterpiece or NEAR masterpiece in the visual sense, I'd say.

 

(...I'm thinkin' "The Red Shoes", "Pandora and The Flying Dutchman" and perhaps "A Matter of Life and Death" especially here)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

the best technicolor film I 've seen photographed by Jack Cardiff is The Vikings (1958).

 

 

Yeah, well, didn't you once say you really had a thing for fjords???

 

(...as compared to Chevys, of course)

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

New Members:

Register Here

Learn more about the new message boards:

FAQ

Having problems?

Contact Us