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Probably mentioned here before, but for me, it's always been RENE AUBERJONOIS!

 

By the way, MY name often got butchered, although It isn't as difficult as many other Slavic/Polish names.  I think people see it and determine it's Polish and give up on the spot!

 

But even I pronounce it different from other family members.  I adapted to the more easy pronunciation to put others more at ease.  Still, many tend to ADD a letter to it!

 

 

Sepiatone

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Stars that never married

 

 

 

 

Some stars never married, because quite simply they did not live long enough. It’s interesting to speculate which starlet James Dean might have wed if he hadn’t died so young. He did date Ursula Andress for awhile.

 

screen-shot-2015-04-30-at-4-17-18-pm.png

 

Other stars did not marry, because they were involved for years with a person married to someone else. Marion Davies was the long-time mistress of publishing tycoon William Randolph Hearst, and she even had a child by him. But he never obtained a divorced from his estranged wife to make it official with Davies. After Hearst’s death, Davies finally did get married (to a man who looked a lot like Hearst actually).

 

imgres56.jpg?w=660

 

Then there are stars that did not marry, and did not even have weddings of convenience, because of their (sometimes alleged) sexual orientation. There were no marriages for Farley Granger, Roddy McDowall, Lizabeth Scott or Tab Hunter. Though Tab has had the same partner since 1983.

 

dolores-hart-muestra-en-su-aba_5425_zpsb

 

Some stars did not marry, due to other more unique reasons. Actress Dolores Hart who left movies to enter a convent was prohibited from marrying as a Roman Catholic nun. But at least she has her memories of kissing Elvis. Meanwhile, Elizabeth Taylor died a single woman who had not been married from 1996 until her death in 2011– probably because she had already been there and done that, many times. For her, marriage wasn’t something she needed anymore.

 

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I believe Lillian Gish never married.  I always wondered why since she was beautiful woman.  In an interview she mentioned career and marriage don't go hand in hand.  So maybe that was her thing.

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I believe Lillian Gish never married.  I always wondered why since she was beautiful woman.  In an interview she mentioned career and marriage don't go hand in hand.  So maybe that was her thing.

Good example. Yes, I have a feeling she was married to her career. Maybe she had her heart broken by someone and never got over it.

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Garbo

Patsy Kelly is another. She was pretty 'out' in her day-- so if they had legalized gay marriages back then, she might have had one of those.

 

By the way, is it just me, or does Patsy Kelly seem to resemble Rosie O'Donnell (and vice versa)...?

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Patsy Kelly is another. She was pretty 'out' in her day-- so if they had legalized gay marriages back then, she might have had one of those.

 

By the way, is it just me, or does Patsy Kelly seem to resemble Rosie O'Donnell (and vice versa)...?

This sounds like another "outing" topic.

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This sounds like another "outing" topic.

It's not. If you look at the four paragraphs in the column I wrote today, I covered several different reasons why stars do not marry. But if we left this reason out (alleged orientation) then it would not be overall accurate. This should not be a subtopic we are afraid of discussing, as long as it's done in an intelligent, thoughtful way.

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Barry Fitzgerald was never married either.

That's true. He was an interesting character. I love his role in A CATERED AFFAIR, where he's the confirmed bachelor brother of Bette Davis who finds love (and a wife) later in life.

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Recommended films vol. 4


 


MRS. WIGGS OF THE CABBAGE PATCH (1934)



1wiggs.png?w=660


Why you should see it: This is a poignant drama, about the Wiggs family who live in poverty and give thanks, even though they do not have a turkey for Thanksgiving. Mrs. Wiggs (Pauline Lord) has quite a few children, and the girls are all named after continents. A very young Virginia Weidler plays Europena. And while there may not be enough money to go around to raise the children decent-like, there is plenty of love to make up for it, and kindness from Mom’s friend Miss Lucy who gives them a turkey. The family is equally surprised when another turkey shows up: their ne’er-do-well father played by Donald Meek.


 


More reasons: W.C. Fields is a neighborhood bachelor that a love-starved neighbor lady, played by ZaSu Pitts, is trying to get her hooks into! Don’t ask why, because I haven’t figured out why anyone would want to marry Fields.


 


***


THE ASTONISHED HEART (1950)


1astonished.png?w=660


Why you should watch it: Noel Coward wrote the original play and the screenplay, plus he performed the lead role in the film. He also composed the score, and I must say that even though the story is not one of his best, and his acting is not as good as other men of his generation, he has crafted a most superb piece of music.


 


More reasons: Costars include Celia Johnson and Margaret Leighton, both adding considerably to the film’s value.


 


***


LADYBUG LADYBUG (1963)


screen-shot-2015-04-30-at-6-29-25-pm.png


Why you should watch it: This film provides a unique glimpse into an era just after the Cuban missile crisis, when bomb shelters and emergency drills for nuclear attacks were commonplace. In this case, an east coast school, which frequently conducts such drills, experiences a wave of terror when a false alarm is believed to be the real thing. Educators are told to take the children home, and along the way, some very shocking (and tragic) things happen. The best scenes involve a bossy young girl who refuses to let anyone in or out of a bomb shelter; and a teacher, played by Nancy Marchand, who must face her own fears during the journey.


 


More reasons: The film ends on a very intriguing and ambiguous note, because some of the participants, especially Marchand’s character, seem to still believe that the United States is under attack.


 


***


AUDREY ROSE (1977)


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Why you should watch it:  this is a supernatural thriller about reincarnation (with some Catholicism mixed in) that screams for repeat viewings. Anthony Hopkins, years before his frightening turn as the cannibalistic Hannibal Lector, is a man convinced that his daughter was reborn to an unsuspecting couple (Marsha Mason & John Beck). When the girl in question begins to experience powerful sensations of a past life, Hopkins steps out of the shadows and into their lives.


 


More reasons: it’s directed by Robert Wise, who previously helmed THE HAUNTING. Also, it uses flashbacks in a way that no other film does.


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Recommended films vol. 4

 

MRS. WIGGS OF THE CABBAGE PATCH (1934)

1wiggs.png?w=660

Why you should see it: This is a poignant drama, about the Wiggs family who live in poverty and give thanks, even though they do not have a turkey for Thanksgiving. Mrs. Wiggs (Pauline Lord) has quite a few children, and the girls are all named after continents. A very young Virginia Weidler plays Europena. And while there may not be enough money to go around to raise the children decent-like, there is plenty of love to make up for it, and kindness from Mom’s friend Miss Lucy who gives them a turkey. The family is equally surprised when another turkey shows up: their ne’er-do-well father played by Donald Meek.

 

More reasons: W.C. Fields is a neighborhood bachelor that a love-starved neighbor lady, played by ZaSu Pitts, is trying to get her hooks into! Don’t ask why, because I haven’t figured out why anyone would want to marry Fields.

 

 

I saw this rare film at a WC Fields film festival in Berkeley around 1969. Fields is not in it very much. Just a little in the beginning and later near the end. The film is mainly about the local poor women and the kids.

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I saw this rare film at a WC Fields film festival in Berkeley around 1969. Fields is not in it very much. Just a little in the beginning and later near the end. The film is mainly about the local poor women and the kids.

You're right. I think they (meaning the Paramount bosses) inserted Fields in this movie because he was a bankable name and could help get the film exhibited, and make it a hit with audiences. But yeah, he's essentially playing a supporting character, or maybe you could say he's starring in the subplot.  He and Pitts, though, are wonderful together.

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Watching movies online

 

Not long ago I wrote a column about the closing of a neighborhood multiplex. It was something I took personally, because many of my fondest memories as a child involved going to see movies at neighborhood theaters. I was experiencing a wave of nostalgia for the simpler older days, even though those days were not too long ago and probably not too simple.

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I also wrote a column about the demise of a local video store in a Colorado town where I spent my adolescence. With the widespread use of VCRs in the 1980s, home video made inroads and created a new aftermarket for classic films. In a way, this meant people stopped going to the local movie theatre so much, because they decided to wait until something came out on video.

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And now, people wait for films to become available online. Access to films has evolved a great deal, and as a result, it changes how people may watch them. Some view titles directly on streaming sites like Netflix or Amazon Prime, as opposed to ‘live’ broadcasts on cable. Obviously, the appeal of online services usually depends upon how sites’ film catalogues are updated. A popular title may remain available for a lengthy period of time, but another less-popular one may not.

screen-shot-2015-05-02-at-1-18-19-pm.png

To be honest, I do not watch as many titles online as I did a year or two ago. Perhaps the novelty has worn off, and perhaps I find it easier to go back to watching films I’ve purchased or recorded on VHS and DVD. 

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I have gone from watching movies at the multiplex, to watching movies on cable, to watching movies on-demand and online. But I have also gone from watching movies online to writing about them and understanding that no matter how one watches movies, it is the memory of the experience that stays with the viewer long afterward that counts the most.

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There is an entire website that lists closed theaters and drive-ins:

http://cinematreasures.org

 

One of those grand old theaters was in Toledo, OH.  I was there during the years when it was a night club.

 

Here is a thumbnail of a photo you can click on of it in the 70s or 80s after it closed as a theater.

post-45430-0-39726300-1430935893_thumb.jpg

 

Then here is a thumbnail you can click on of what they did with it sometime in the late 80s/early 90s.  For a little while it was sort of an upscale night club.

 

The lobby, when you first walk in, was converted to a bar that faced the entryway.  Then beyond, on either side of the bar, that there were two sets of stairs that went down to a basement "grunge rock" area.  There were also two passage ways that went straight ahead and came out where you see the two railings to the sides in the middle of the audience area.  They put a DJ booth in just to the right of the left-side entrance.  There was a bar at the top, and a bar at the bottom.  The dance floor was in the foreground of this picture.  Then the stage  (presumably the camera vantage point) also served as a raised dance floor.

 

post-45430-0-53159400-1430936183_thumb.jpg

 

It didn't stay vibrant like this for very long, this was a short-term fix.  They eventually demolished this historic theater building for a large downtown development project.

 

I'm sure there are some other stories out there of what became of old theaters.

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You're right. I think they (meaning the Paramount bosses) inserted Fields in this movie because he was a bankable name and could help get the film exhibited, and make it a hit with audiences. But yeah, he's essentially playing a supporting character, or maybe you could say he's starring in the subplot.  He and Pitts, though, are wonderful together.

 

I thought the rest of the movie was very booring without him.

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One of those grand old theaters was in Toledo, OH.  I was there during the years when it was a night club.

 

I grew up in mostly small towns, some with only one small theater.

 

I remember my favorite theater was in a little town in Alabama in 1952 This was about 35-40 miles from where Harper Lee lived in the 1930s and where TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD takes place. I was 10 years old in 1952. I saw KING KONG in that theater in 1952, also BITTER RICE (in Italian with subtitles). A boy age 10, I didn't read any of the subtitles because I was busy watching those Italian ladies in their slips and shorts!  :)

 

Also, I saw that documentary about the elephant stampede and the white monkey with the houses built on stilts. It is silent with title cards. TCM shows it from time to time.

 

I saw about 4 movies a week in that theater. 2 for kids at the Saturday afternoon matinee, and 2 with my folks on Friday or Saturday night. The first-run new films were actually about a year old by the time that theater got them. To see a new first run film when it first came out, we occasionally drove to Mobile, and we saw them in big Cinema Palaces. I saw a re-issue of GONE WITH THE WIND in Mobile in 1953 This film was still a big hit in the South back in those days.

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We have a theater around the corner http://starlightcinemas.com/location/23445/Starlight-Theatres-Terrace-Cinema-6-Showtimes that shows how theaters can survive in today's climate.

 

It was a major chain theater that the chain basically abandoned. It was run down yet, still charged high prices. I remember it was $12 a movie ticket. It was basically a wasteland except for Friday, Saturday and Sunday afternoons.

 

This entrepreneur bought it, totally upgraded all the equipment and interior. Even has 3D capability. And get this , he "lowered" the prices all around for tickets. ( concessions are high but, that is to be expected. you don't have to buy the food ).

 

The key was because he isn't a top heavy chain, he has much less overhead. The regular price is $10 bucks but I have never paid it. Tuesdays and Thursdays are only $5 all day. I saw Furious 7 for that price the other day. Wednesday is cheap for seniors only $4. Military, Students, Police and Fire also get deals. 

 

New theater, new movies, lower prices. That will pull people out of their homes. I used to work in the complex and many have told me that this was the one place they could afford to take their family.

 

I bet many of those sufferring theaters could learn from this. Because there is nothing like the big screen IMO.    

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The regular price is $10 bucks but I have never paid it. Tuesdays and Thursdays are only $5 all day. I saw Furious 7 for that price the other day.

 

This is the regular price for FURIOUS 7:

 

screen-shot-2015-04-21-at-6-29-50-pm.png

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Funniest Lucille Ball movies


 


Some Lucille Ball movies are funnier than others. In the late 1930s, while still under contract at RKO, Lucy was given the chance to star opposite comics Joe Penner, the Marx Brothers and Jack Oakie in several comedies. However, those films were designed to showcase the talents of the leading men, and Lucy didn’t get a chance to show off her own flair for comedy until she was at MGM in the mid-40s. But her first good comedy parts were as support to Katharine Hepburn and Spencer Tracy in WITHOUT LOVE; and supporting Esther Williams and Van Johnson in EASY TO WED.


lucille_ball_1944crop.jpg?w=660


It wasn’t until she left Metro and started to work for Harry Cohn in the late 40s that she did comedy leads in motion pictures. Part of this came about, because the actress was a hit on a domestic sitcom each week on the radio. The radio program, My Favorite Husband, would serve as the basis for I Love Lucy when Lucy made the transition to television the following decade. On radio, Richard Denning was the favorite husband, though real-life spouse Desi Arnaz would take over on TV.


missgranttakesrichmond1949_ff_188x141_08


But Lucy still had a movie career at this point (and technically, she would continue her movie career even while appearing on television, though her appearances on the big screen would be fewer). At Columbia, Harry Cohn assigned her what were probably her best films in terms of showing off the brand of wackiness that would become her trademark. One of the funniest of these was MISS GRANT TAKES RICHMOND.


220px-miss_grant_takes_richmond_filmpost


Her leading man was William Holden (who later guest-starred on Lucy’s TV sitcom). The plot had her as an incompetent secretary who gets sent to work for a real estate office. Lucy had played a girl Friday in the film noir DARK CORNER, and on her later sitcom Here’s Lucy, she would play a bumbling secretary to Gale Gordon. In fact, the plot from MISS GRANT is recycled on an episode of Here’s Lucy.


190px-poster_of_the_movie_the_fuller_bru


Lucy’s next big comedy for Columbia was THE FULLER BRUSH GIRL. This was a follow-up of sorts to the studio’s earlier hit THE FULLER BRUSH MAN with Red Skelton. Like Skelton before her, Lucy is a door-to-door salesperson; and also like Skelton, she gets involved in a series of madcap adventures with various customers. A romantic subplot occurs with costar Eddie Albert. Years later Albert would play himself on an episode of Here’s Lucy after his own sitcom Green Acres had ended.


220px-fancy_pants.jpg?w=213&h=300


While she was still under contract at Columbia, Cohn loaned Lucy out to Paramount for two comedies with Bob Hope. One of these was a remake of RUGGLES OF RED GAP, which was retitled FANCY PANTS. Hope takes the role played previously by Charles Laughton, and Lucy is his hapless love interest. Hope would turn up on Lucy’s television programs; and in fact, Lucy’s last public appearance in the 1980s was at the Oscars with Hope.


 


Of course, Lucy’s claim to fame is probably her television sitcom work and the countless specials she did over the years. But it’s fun to look at the movies she made in the late 1940s and early 1950s, where one can see her hone the type of slapstick (or is it shtick?) she excelled at doing.


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Funniest Lucille Ball movies

 

Some Lucille Ball movies are funnier than others. In the late 1930s, while still under contract at RKO, Lucy was given the chance to star opposite comics Joe Penner, the Marx Brothers and Jack Oakie in several comedies. However, those films were designed to showcase the talents of the leading men, and Lucy didn’t get a chance to show off her own flair for comedy until she was at MGM in the mid-40s. But her first good comedy parts were as support to Katharine Hepburn and Spencer Tracy in WITHOUT LOVE; and supporting Esther Williams and Van Johnson in EASY TO WED.

lucille_ball_1944crop.jpg?w=660

It wasn’t until she left Metro and started to work for Harry Cohn in the late 40s that she did comedy leads in motion pictures. Part of this came about, because the actress was a hit on a domestic sitcom each week on the radio. The radio program, My Favorite Husband, would serve as the basis for I Love Lucy when Lucy made the transition to television the following decade. On radio, Richard Denning was the favorite husband, though real-life spouse Desi Arnaz would take over on TV.

missgranttakesrichmond1949_ff_188x141_08

But Lucy still had a movie career at this point (and technically, she would continue her movie career even while appearing on television, though her appearances on the big screen would be fewer). At Columbia, Harry Cohn assigned her what were probably her best films in terms of showing off the brand of wackiness that would become her trademark. One of the funniest of these was MISS GRANT GOES TO RICHMOND.

220px-miss_grant_takes_richmond_filmpost

Her leading man was William Holden (who later guest-starred on Lucy’s TV sitcom). The plot had her as an incompetent secretary who gets sent to work for a real estate office. Lucy had played a girl Friday in the film noir DARK CORNER, and on her later sitcom Here’s Lucy, she would play a bumbling secretary to Gale Gordon. In fact, the plot from MISS GRANT is recycled on an episode of Here’s Lucy.

190px-poster_of_the_movie_the_fuller_bru

Lucy’s next big comedy for Columbia was THE FULLER BRUSH GIRL. This was a follow-up of sorts to the studio’s earlier hit THE FULLER BRUSH MAN with Red Skelton. Like Skelton before her, Lucy is a door-to-door salesperson; and also like Skelton, she gets involved in a series of madcap adventures with various customers. A romantic subplot occurs with costar Eddie Albert. Years later Albert would play himself on an episode of Here’s Lucy after his own sitcom Green Acres had ended.

220px-fancy_pants.jpg?w=213&h=300

While she was still under contract at Columbia, Cohn loaned Lucy out to Paramount for two comedies with Bob Hope. One of these was a remake of RUGGLES OF RED GAP, which was retitled FANCY PANTS. Hope takes the role played previously by Charles Laughton, and Lucy is his hapless love interest. Hope would turn up on Lucy’s television programs; and in fact, Lucy’s last public appearance in the 1980s was at the Oscars with Hope.

 

Of course, Lucy’s claim to fame is probably her television sitcom work and the countless specials she did over the years. But it’s fun to look at the movies she made in the late 1940s and early 1950s, where one can see her hone the type of slapstick (or is it shtick?) she excelled at doing.

Good.writeup of one of my favorite tv.stars. Just one minor point......it's MISS GRANT TAKES RICHMOND......You must've been channeling Capra.

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Good.writeup of one of my favorite tv.stars. Just one minor point......it's MISS GRANT TAKES RICHMOND......You must've been channeling Capra.

You're right-- I will go back and fix the earlier post. Thanks.

 

Once, on the old AMC, Bob Dorian said THE BIG STREET was Lucille Ball's personal favorite (maybe because she had a meatier dramatic role in it). But her comedies were her bread-and-butter.

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You're right-- I will go back and fix the earlier post. Thanks.

 

Once, on the old AMC, Bob Dorian said THE BIG STREET was Lucille Ball's personal favorite (maybe because she had a meatier dramatic role in it). But her comedies were her bread-and-butter.

I always liked that line a.critic said about Lucy and THE BIG STREET, Something along the lines of."Pretty Lucille Ball was born for the roles.Ginger Rogers sweats over. She tackles this meaty part as.if were sirloin and she doesnt care who's looking."2

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In addition to Miss Grant Takes Richmond and The Fuller Brush Girl, another of Lucy's funniest movies is one of her earliest leading roles: Annabel Allison in The Affairs of Annabel.  This movie provided Lucy with one of her earliest opportunities to show off her comedic skills.  She's hilarious as the actress forced into one wacky publicity scheme after another by her wacky agent, Jack Oakie.  The sequel, Annabel Takes a Tour isn't nearly as good as the first one. 

 

I'm always of the opinion that any movie with Lucy in it is worth watching.  Even in the most mediocre film, usually Lucy's contributions are worthwhile.

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