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roverrocks

Hitchcock's THE LODGER (1928)

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Watched an excellent early Hitchcock silent thriller today on Amazon for rent TV: THE LODGER (1928).  Hitchcock's penchant for blondes was never more evident than in this good silent murder mystery.  Well worth viewing this restored silent.  Good score as well.  Supposed to be the first Hitchcock movie where he appeared momentarily as became his trademark but I am afraid I did not notice him which means I will have to watch it again one of these days.01.jpg

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...

 

Supposed to be the first Hitchcock movie where he appeared momentarily as became his trademark but I am afraid I did not notice him which means I will have to watch it again one of these days.

 

He should appear twice

 

Time:    0:03  At a desk in the newsroom

 

Time:    1:34  In the mob scene next to Detective Joe who's bearing the lodger's weight on the fence

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He should appear twice

 

Time:    0:03  At a desk in the newsroom

 

Time:    1:34  In the mob scene next to Detective Joe who's bearing the lodger's weight on the fence

Good info.  Thanks.  I'll check next time I watch.  I always think of him being an older chubby guy with jowls.  This is an early days movie so I need to pay attention to somebody much younger.  Thanks.

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Hi Roverrocks,

I read your post with interest. Last year my second book based on silent films, Nosferatu: A Symphony of Horror, was published. Shortly after I completed another silent film book I had been working on for a while about The Lodger which is now available through Amazon and other on-line booksellers. If you are familiar with the old Photoplay books from the teens, twenties and thirties it is based around that idea but in an expanded and amplified way. The text of the original novel by Marie Belloc Lowndes is interspersed with scenes from Hitchcock's movie. Sections of the film which are independent of the novel are presented in story board fashion, such as the opening scene of the murder and the fashion show, as well as the ending which is entirely Hitchcock's creation. I won't give any spoilers here. Needless to say, both the film and the novel arrive at different conclusions about the Mr. Sleuth, the lodger. I've also included the original short story by Lowndes which served as the basis for the novel. I'm not sure if you are aware but the novel was the first fictionalized account of the Jack The Ripper Whitechapel murders. 

 

The book is in a large 8" x 10" format with almost 150 images from and about the film.

The ISBN is: 978-1508463474

 

Here is an image of the cover from Amazon:

 

51cfE69WlHL.jpg

 

Sincerely,

Roy A. Sites

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Watched an excellent early Hitchcock silent thriller today on Amazon for rent TV: THE LODGER (1928).  Hitchcock's penchant for blondes was never more evident than in this good silent murder mystery.  Well worth viewing this restored silent.  Good score as well.  Supposed to be the first Hitchcock movie where he appeared momentarily as became his trademark but I am afraid I did not notice him which means I will have to watch it again one of these days.01.jpg

 

I loved this movie, it was so different from other silent films I've seen! My opinion of the Lodger changed so many times and so quickly in this movie, I kept thinking I had it all figured out and then something would happen and I'd change my mind. the facial expressions, the wardrobe, the setting, it was all so great. I love at the end when you can see that flashing sign out the window that has been flashing throughout the film (trying not to give anything away). Did the older landlady (I think it was Daisy's mother) drive anyone else crazy? She was so nosy, and she accused before having any substantial facts. Maybe thats just me, but that character really annoyed me, and usually I don't get that annoyed at a character.

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