Sign in to follow this  
Kid Dabb

The Sinking of the Lusitania (1918)

3 posts in this topic

This article is about the 1918 animated film.

 
The Sinking of the Lusitania (1918) is a silent animated short film by American cartoonist Winsor McCay. A work of propaganda, it is a re-creation of the never-photographed 1915 sinking of the RMS Lusitania. At twelve minutes it has been called the longest work of animation at the time of its release. The film is the earliest surviving animated documentary and serious, dramatic work of animation.
 
In 1915, a German submarine torpedoed and sank the RMS Lusitania; 128 Americans were among the 1,198 dead. The event outraged McCay, but the newspapers of his employer William Randolph Hearst downplayed the tragedy..
 
Full wiki-page HERE

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

This article is about the 1918 animated film.

 
The Sinking of the Lusitania (1918) is a silent animated short film by American cartoonist Winsor McCay. A work of propaganda, it is a re-creation of the never-photographed 1915 sinking of the RMS Lusitania. At twelve minutes it has been called the longest work of animation at the time of its release. The film is the earliest surviving animated documentary and serious, dramatic work of animation.
 
In 1915, a German submarine torpedoed and sank the RMS Lusitania; 128 Americans were among the 1,198 dead. The event outraged McCay, but the newspapers of his employer William Randolph Hearst downplayed the tragedy..
 
Full wiki-page HERE

 

This short is quite good.  Read a great book on the Lusitania recently called "DEAD WAKE: The Last Crossing of the Lusitania" by Erik Larson.  A very sobering book that leaves a lot of unanswered questions about British political and Admiralty "intentions" and "culpability" in the disaster.  In other words, Britain was ready to do about anything to possibly get the U.S. involved in the war.  British documents are still closed and unavailable on the sinking and political ramifications and why there was not more British naval protection for the ship..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This short is quite good.  Read a great book on the Lusitania recently called "DEAD WAKE: The Last Crossing of the Lusitania" by Erik Larson.  A very sobering book that leaves a lot of unanswered questions about British political and Admiralty "intentions" and "culpability" in the disaster.  In other words, Britain was ready to do about anything to possibly get the U.S. involved in the war.  British documents are still closed and unavailable on the sinking and political ramifications and why there was not more British naval protection for the ship..

The pre-War U.S. position has always fascinated me and yet, I have not read much about it. Occasionally, I will see a program on cable but that's about it. I did read Douglas Brinkley's WHEELS for the WORLD - this touched lightly on Ford's (the man) pre-War position. One of a handful of books I read straight through. A good read.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

New Members:

Register Here

Learn more about the new message boards:

FAQ

Having problems?

Contact Us