Bogie56

HITS & MISSES: Yesterday, Today & Tomorrow on TCM

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I want to recommend Scaramouche which in tomorrow night's Silent Sunday presentation. Starring Ramon Novarro, Lewis Stone & Alice Terry.

 

We had the same thought mr.6666

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My pick tomorrow is Born Yesterday featuring Broderick Crawford's bathrobe.  When I first saw this movie, I enjoyed it except for I thought Judy Holliday was annoying.  However, with subsequent viewings, she grows on you.  Now I really like Judy Holliday.  I especially liked hearing her sing in Bells Are Ringing.  I had no idea she was such a prolific jazz singer.  It's a shame that cancer claimed her life at such a young age (43).

 

I'm personally recording For the Defense with William Powell and Kay Francis.  I'm mostly recording it for William Powell.  I keep trying to watch Francis' films, but I guess I just don't "get" her.  She doesn't do anything for me. 

 

I'm also recording The Bitter Tea of General Yen for two reasons: 1) it's a pre-code; and 2) it has one of my faves, Barbara Stanwyck. 

 

I'm excited for Monday's Alexis Smith tribute.

 

My pick for Monday is Gentleman Jim.  This movie has great boxing scenes, great actors like Errol Flynn, Alexis Smith, Alan Hale, Ward Bond and William Frawley.  It also has a fun story and a great rapport between Flynn and Smith.  The scene at the end of the film between Flynn and Bond is particularly poignant.  My favorite part is the end with Alan Hale when he yells: "Give him room!" Then of course, there's the whole reason for watching the film in the first place: Errol Flynn shirtless and in tight pants... okay... maybe that's only my reason for watching the film, but he's super hot and the film is fantastic to boot.  It's a win-win for everyone involved!

 

I'm planning on recording:

The Smiling Ghost

The Constant Nymph

The Horn Blows at Midnight

 

I really like Alexis Smith.  I hadn't really heard of her until last year's SUTS tribute.  Great work TCM!

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My pick tomorrow is Born Yesterday featuring Broderick Crawford's bathrobe.  

Yes, it's that time we've all been waiting for.  Broderick Crawford bathrobe day at 2 p.m.

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My pick tomorrow is Born Yesterday featuring Broderick Crawford's bathrobe.  When I first saw this movie, I enjoyed it except for I thought Judy Holliday was annoying.  However, with subsequent viewings, she grows on you.  Now I really like Judy Holliday.  I especially liked hearing her sing in Bells Are Ringing.  I had no idea she was such a prolific jazz singer.  It's a shame that cancer claimed her life at such a young age (43).

 

I'm personally recording For the Defense with William Powell and Kay Francis.  I'm mostly recording it for William Powell.  I keep trying to watch Francis' films, but I guess I just don't "get" her.  She doesn't do anything for me. 

 

I'm also recording The Bitter Tea of General Yen for two reasons: 1) it's a pre-code; and 2) it has one of my faves, Barbara Stanwyck. 

 

I'm excited for Monday's Alexis Smith tribute.

 

My pick for Monday is Gentleman Jim.  This movie has great boxing scenes, great actors like Errol Flynn, Alexis Smith, Alan Hale, Ward Bond and William Frawley.  It also has a fun story and a great rapport between Flynn and Smith.  The scene at the end of the film between Flynn and Bond is particularly poignant.  My favorite part is the end with Alan Hale when he yells: "Give him room!" Then of course, there's the whole reason for watching the film in the first place: Errol Flynn shirtless and in tight pants... okay... maybe that's only my reason for watching the film, but he's super hot and the film is fantastic to boot.  It's a win-win for everyone involved!

 

I'm planning on recording:

The Smiling Ghost

The Constant Nymph

The Horn Blows at Midnight

 

I really like Alexis Smith.  I hadn't really heard of her until last year's SUTS tribute.  Great work TCM!

 

Judy Holiday was an actress I dismissed since I found her voice to be annoying and I felt she was overdoing the dumb blonde type character.    But now I'm a fan.    It just took me a while to get her.    Now I find her very funny as well as charming.   Sometimes it just takes time for one to develop an appreciation of another's talent. 

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Judy Holiday was an actress I dismissed since I found her voice to be annoying and I felt she was overdoing the dumb blonde type character.    But now I'm a fan.    It just took me a while for me to get her.    Now I find her very funny as well as charming.   Sometimes it just takes time for one to develop an appreciation of another's talent. 

Agreed.  I had seen two of Holliday's films where she used her squeaky dumb blonde voice and I figured that that was her voice.  I had no idea she was a jazz singer and performed on Broadway.  I saw her in Bells Are Ringing with Dean Martin where she used her normal voice and sang and I loved her.  I wish she had made more films, but I'll just have to try and see the 10 or so that she appears in. 

 

I agree that sometimes it takes awhile to appreciate someone.  I'm finding that now with Jean Harlow and Carole Lombard.  For the longest time, I found their screechy personas to be annoying. 

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Monday, June 8

 

Seems like most of these films have already been on recently.

 

The gem is probably I See a Dark Stranger (1945) at 2:30 a.m.  Directed by Frank Launder.  Starring Deborah Kerr and Trevor Howard.  Co-starring Raymond Huntley in one of his best film roles as Mr. J. Miller.

 
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For Monday I recommend Man Hunt starring Walter Pidgeon, Joan Bennett and George Sanders at 8 pm EDT. Directed by Fritz Lang it's the story of a famous hunter who is recruited to take out Hitler.

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I See a Dark Stranger is a really entertaining film. I recommend it, also. The title seems kind of misleading. Makes it sound very serious, whereas IMO it's sort of the perfect comedy/espionage type of film. Deborah Kerr is great in this- very funny. And her character has such a memorable name, Bridie Quilty, that I thought the film should be called the same thing. Really amusing story, too, though I felt that Bridie herself might resent the pro-British slant on the whole thing.

 

Man Hunt was a film I enjoyed all up until the love interest came into it. It never really recovered from that, for me. And the ending, well, you know...

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I See a Dark Stranger is a really entertaining film. I recommend it, also. The title seems kind of misleading. Makes it sound very serious, whereas IMO it's sort of the perfect comedy/espionage type of film. Deborah Kerr is great in this- very funny. And her character has such a memorable name, Bridie Quilty, that I thought the film should be called the same thing. Really amusing story, too, though I felt that Bridie herself might resent the pro-British slant on the whole thing.

 

Man Hunt was a film I enjoyed all up until the love interest came into it. It never really recovered from that, for me. And the ending, well, you know...

 

Big fan of I See a Dark Stranger.    As you say it is a perfect blend of comedy and espionage.     This is a film that made me give Kerr a second look   (my 'first look' impression from films like From Here to Eternity was that she was too much of a cold fish).

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Wow.  This morning at about 5:50 following Sanjuro, TCM had a very powerful short subject on.  The Ship That Wouldn't Die (1945) about the US carrier Franklin.

Incredible footage of the carrier burning after the Japanese attack and men jumping to the bow of a destroyer rescue ship.

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I wasn't sure where to place this comment so I am using this thread.

 

A while back someone mentioned that he or she thought James Fox had gone into semi-retirement after filming Nicolas Roeg's Performance.  The thought being that it was the experience of making that film that informed his decision.

 

I have really no idea one way or another.  But, anyone who is in London on July 30 may wish to go to the BFI were James Fox is appearing for a Q&A after a screening of Performance.

 

 

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A little late in the day, but does anyone have any thoughts on the next movie up -

Hangmen Also Die!  ?

 

It has an interesting cast - Brian Donlevy, Dennis O'Keefe, Walter Brennan, Anna Lee and Margaret Wycherly.

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A little late in the day, but does anyone have any thoughts on the next movie up -

Hangmen Also Die!  ?

 

It has an interesting cast - Brian Donlevy, Dennis O'Keefe, Walter Brennan, Anna Lee and Margaret Wycherly.

If it was playing in Canada I would be watching for sure!  Fritz Lang.

 

I've seen the other film based on this same story, Hitler's Madman with John Carradine and was greatly disappointed.  Let us know what you think of it.  I've never seen it.

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Fritz Lang's one of my favorite directors--"Hangmen Also Die" (1943) isn't among his best films like "Fury" (1936) or his so-so films like "The Secret Behind the Door" (1948), my least favorite Lang film.  I'd put  HAD solidly among his top half of his American films.  Definitely worth a look.

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Fritz Lang's one of my favorite directors--"Hangmen Also Die" (1943) isn't among his best films like "Fury" (1936) or his so-so films like "The Secret Behind the Door" (1948), my least favorite Lang film.  I'd put  HAD solidly among his top half of his American films.  Definitely worth a look.

I'm still waiting for TCM to show the 1921 and 1959 versions of The Indian Tomb, each of which has connections to Fritz Lang. (Lang had no connection to the 1938 version, apart from the fact that the whole story was based on the novel, written by his wife, Thea Von Harbou, whom he later divorced, partly because she became a Nazi and partly because he caught her in bed with an Indian.)

tumblr_lgjtlbm5rs1qzaawko1_500.png

 

9.jpg

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I'm still waiting for TCM to show both versions of The Indian Tomb, each of which has connections to Fritz Lang.

tumblr_lgjtlbm5rs1qzaawko1_500.png

 

9.jpg

I would say the second version looks better.

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I would say the second version looks better.

More authentic do you think?

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I'm still waiting for TCM to show the 1921 and 1959 versions of The Indian Tomb, each of which has connections to Fritz Lang.

tumblr_lgjtlbm5rs1qzaawko1_500.png

 

9.jpg

 

That's Debra Paget??? Wow!

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That's Debra Paget??? Wow!

That's the snake dance sequence. 

 

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Tuesday, June 9

 

The hot and steamy south during the day and some great 70’s films shot in NYC during the evening.

 

No Hot Spell I’m afraid.

 

10:45 a.m.  It has been a while since I’ve seen Kazan’s Baby Doll.  i wonder how it comes across today?  And speaking of Eli Wallach!

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I hope no one was disappointed in my recommendation of Man Hunt last night. I think it's a pretty good movie where the principals do a great job in their roles. In fact I feel like it's one of Walter Pidgeon's best as the leading man.

 

Tonight I recommend Going In Style starring George Burns, Art Carney & Lee Strasberg as three elderly men who decide to shake up their mundane lives. It was made during George Burns' resurgence as a movie star and is a decidedly serious role for the comedian. Try to watch.

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Tonight I recommend Going In Style starring George Burns, Art Carney & Lee Strasberg as three elderly men who decide to shake up their mundane lives. It was made during George Burns' resurgence as a movie star and is a decidedly serious role for the comedian. Try to watch.

 

I love "Going in Style".  I tried to find it on DVD once.  I'm sorry that I'm missing this - I second your recommendation.

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Wednesday, June 10/11

 

Richard Carlson fans may wish to check out White Cargo (1942) at 5:15 a.m.  Hedy Lamarr drives everyone mad with lust in this one.

 
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