Bogie56

HITS & MISSES: Yesterday, Today & Tomorrow on TCM

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The Master of Ballantrae. May 18, 4:15 om (EST).

 

Loose (very loose) screen adaption of Robert Louis Stevenson's novel was the last good swashbuckler of Errol Flynn's career.

 

Fast paced by director William Keighley, beautifully photographed in Technicolor by master cinematographer Jack Cardiff in some exquisite outdoor location work (Scotland and Sicily), with a superior supporting cast of British players, including a scene stealing Roger Livesey as an Irish soldier-of-fortune who is pure rogue.

 

Flynn is clearly older here, and his trademark light heartedness is gone, but he gives a persuasive performance and still looked convincing with a sword in his hand.

 

errol-flynn-the-master-of-ballantrae-195

 

Gilliane Lynne, pictured above, later revealed that she had a brief affair with Errol while making this film. Said the lady about her affair with Flynn:

 

“It was very difficult for it not to come about! He was a gorgeous man and he was very witty, very funny and well educated actually. It wasn’t all about sex, it was all about fun. We liked each other.

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Friday, May 19/20

 

2 a.m.  Belle de Jour (1967).  This Luis Bunuel film is one of my favourites.

 
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May 19th/20th--Mystery series by day, 1967 at night.  All times E.S.T.

 

10:30 a.m. "The Mysterious Intruder" (1946)--Last of the William Castle "Whistler" films.

 

12:15 a.m. "Point Blank" (1967)--Good Lee Marvin/Angie Dickinson revenge movie.

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Saturday, May 20

 

6 a.m.  Triple Cross (1966).  With Trevor Howard, Christopher Plummer and Romy Schneider.  I saw this way back in 1970 so it is all a bit foggy now.

 
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Saturday, May 20th/21st.  All times E.S.T.:

 

2:15 p.m. "20 Million Miles To Earth" (1957)--Excellent "creature on the loose" movie, with special effects by Ray Harryhausen.

 

2:00 a.m. "Eraserhead" (1977)--David ("Blue Velvet") Lynch's debut film.  One of the strangest movies I've ever seen.  Not for all tastes, but if you want to see a weird film, this is it.

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Saturday, May 20

 

6 a.m.  Triple Cross (1966).  With Trevor Howard, Christopher Plummer and Romy Schneider.  I saw this way back in 1970 so it is all a bit foggy now.

 

 

This movie is excellent! It works on many levels and is a bit of a mystery even at the end. The personalities are quite distinct and deeply drawn.

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Sunday, May 21/22

 

12:15 a.m.  Love (1927).  with Garbo.

 

2 a.m.  A Brighter Summer Day (1991) A rare opportunity to see this Edward Yang film.

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Monday, May 22 is Laurence Olivier day. I'm recording:

 

Westward Passage (1932), featuring Larry, Ann Harding, ZaSu Pitts and Irving Pichel. This was during Larry's first stab at movie stardom. Things didn't go well (he was generally dismissed as a poor man's Ronald Colman wannabe), so he went back to England and decided to put more energy into stage work. He figured maybe he'd try doing some Shakespeare...next thing you know, OLIVIER!

 

 

Oh, and that night is the "Grand Dame Guignol" showcase, featuring such titles as What Ever Happened to Baby Jane?Strait-JacketWhat's the Matter With Helen?, and The Nanny. I enjoyed Die! Die! My Darling!, one of my favorite movie titles, and featuring Tallulah Bankhead, Stephanie Powers, and Donald Sutherland in one of his first roles. The movie also provided the title for one of my favorite Misfits songs.

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just a word of advice, if the trailer for WHAT'S THE MATTER WITH HELEN? comes on TCM again (they showed it at least once yesterday) BEWARE- the final shot TOTALLY GIVES WAY THE SURPRISE ENDING.

 

(Still don't know whose idea that was.)

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ANY love for tonite's Underground.......??

 

I love light-hearted tales about fatherhood.

 

eraserhead-baby.jpg

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ANY love for tonite's Underground.......??

 

It's trying to be Lynch's "REM-state filmmaking", where he tries to technically recreate the sound, acting, cinematography and editing of real dreams, just like he did (better) with Agent Cooper's Midget in the "Twin Peaks" episode.  Be honest, if you hooked your head to a camera before bed and watched them the next morning... :o If you remember the "Dream Studio" scenes from Pixar's "Inside Out", Lynch did it first.

(There are some nice REM-state touches in other early-Lynch commercial films, like the opening scenes with Anthony Hopkins at the sideshow in "The Elephant Man", and arguably a few in "Dune".)

 

Only other times I've seen a director do that intentionally and successfully was with Orson Welles on The Trial, and with Neil Jordan on his Freudian werewolf movie The Company of Wolves.

Both are just as freaky but more to the directorial intent, whereas Lynch gets a few dream-scenes right at the beginning (eg. the dinner), and then lets it spin out like the night after a bad burrito.

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It's trying to be Lynch's "REM-state filmmaking", where he tries to technically recreate the sound, acting, cinematography and editing of real dreams, just like he did (better) with Agent Cooper's Midget in the "Twin Peaks" episode. Be honest, if you hooked your head to a camera before bed and watched them the next morning... :o If you remember the "Dream Studio" scenes from Pixar's "Inside Out", Lynch did it first.

(There are some nice REM-state touches in other early-Lynch commercial films, like the opening scenes with Anthony Hopkins at the sideshow in "The Elephant Man", and arguably a few in "Dune".)

 

Only other times I've seen a director do that intentionally and successfully was with Orson Welles on The Trial, and with Neil Jordan on his Freudian werewolf movie The Company of Wolves.

Both are just as freaky but more to the directorial intent, whereas Lynch gets a few dream-scenes right at the beginning (eg. the dinner), and then lets it spin out like the night after a bad burrito.

Thank you, that was fascinating.

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Thank you, that was fascinating.

 

(inserts Futurama "Not sure if serious" meme)

<_<

Well, it is to ME:  If you've seen Welles' more professional attempt at filmed dreams in "The Trial", they're still seriously freaky enough to get into your head, even without the mutant babies or radiator singers:

 

 

Lynch just liked the "weird" imagery (like the abstract images at the beginning of Eraserhead and Elephant Man, that both suggest the random images of Stage 2 & 3 sleep), although Jordan's "Company of Wolves" tried to go straight for "nightmare" and got that one too close for comfort with just the right amount of orchestrated hysteria.

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(inserts Futurama "Not sure if serious" meme)

<_<

Well, it is to ME: If you've seen Welles' more professional attempt at filmed dreams in "The Trial", they're still seriously freaky enough to get into your head, even without the mutant babies or radiator singers:

 

 

Lynch just liked the "weird" imagery (like the abstract images at the beginning of Eraserhead and Elephant Man, that both suggest the random images of Stage 2 & 3 sleep), although Jordan's "Company of Wolves" tried to go straight for "nightmare" and got that one too close for comfort with just the right amount of orchestrated hysteria.

No I was being totally serious, thank you, that was genuinely fascinating I've never thought about that before.

 

(Not EVERYTHING I say is sarcastic!)

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May 22nd/23rd--Grand Dame Guignol:  All times E.S.T.:

 

10:30 p.m. "Strait-Jacket" (1964)--Joan Crawford, in mental distress.  Watch for the visual after the end credits.

 

2:15 a.m. "What's The Matter With Helen?" (1971)--Good Curtis Harrington chiller, with Debbie Reynolds and Shelley Winters.  His films are either good or bad--no in-between.

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Monday, May 22

 

10:30 p.m.  Die! Die! My Darling (1965).  I thought both Tallulah Bankhead and Stefanie Powers were pretty good in this one.

 
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...LOOOOOOVE IS A MANY SPLENDOOOOOOOORED THIIIIIIIIIIING is coming on tonight. If you'd like to see some excellent color photography of Hong Kong (?) circa 1954, it's the movie for you.

 

Outside of that, it's a pretty dumb movie, but if you would like to get some perspective on how far we've come (before sadly regressing) in terms of race, feel free to check it out.

 

I think this is probably the only film thats ever used a hysterectomy as a punchline.

 

EDIT: wait a minute. Just remembered CRY BABY (1988) does too- and in their case the joke is actually funny.

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Tuesday, May 23

 

4:15 p.m.  Othello (1952).  A great Orson Welles film.  It is coming out soon on Criterion and I wonder if its copy will be broadcast by TCM.

 
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Tuesday, May 23

 

4:15 p.m.  Othello (1952).  A great Orson Welles film.  It is coming out soon on Criterion and I wonder if its copy will be broadcast by TCM.

If you play very close attention to the final scene where Othello stabs himself, he mumbles "rosebud."

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If you play very close attention to the final scene where Othello stabs himself, he mumbles "rosebud."

Yes,indeed, it is the director's cut release.

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Tuesday, May 23rd.  All times E.S.T.:

 

12:30 p.m. "The Verdict" (1946)--Interesting sounding film has Peter Lorre and Sydney Greeenstreet in their eighth teaming.

 

12:15 a.m. "San Francisco" (1936)--Disaster movie teams Gable and Jeanette MacDonald.

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San Francisco has excellent special effects for 1936.

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Tuesday, May 23rd.  All times E.S.T.:

 

12:30 p.m. "The Verdict" (1946)--Interesting sounding film has Peter Lorre and Sydney Greeenstreet in their eighth teaming.

 

 

I think this is the film where they try to solve a murder which takes place in a locked room. If so, it's a good flick with a twist ending.

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