Bogie56

HITS & MISSES: Yesterday, Today & Tomorrow on TCM

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5 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

What "other movie"? I only see Falcon movies from 6 AM to 8 PM.

On the Spectrum Info. feature it listed a 1920's movie in the middle.  However, it also showed some 60+ min. Falcon movies as being 30 mins. long.  The problem was in the listing by Spectrum as the movies played as shown on TCM schedule.  Spectrum has done this before.

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Nov 7 appears to be a Miriam Hopkins marathon. 

I recommend the Fredric March/Miriam Hopkins version of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde.  I found it much more interesting than the 1941 Spencer Tracy version.  I much preferred March's portrayal of the two-faced scientist.  I also found Hopkins to be much more effective as Ivy than Ingrid Bergman in the Tracy version. 

I like Virginia City for Flynn, Alan Hale and Guinn Williams.  Randolph Scott is fine in the villain role. Bogart is terrible as the Mexican bandit with the bad accent and bad mustache.  Hopkins is miscast as the dance hall girl.  She has no chemistry with Flynn.  I find it very hard to believe that Flynn would fall in love with her.  Despite that, the film is a good watch if only for Flynn and his buddies Hale and Williams. 

I'm recording: Barbary Coast, Lady with Red Hair, Men are Not Gods and The Old Maid

In the evening, as part of the blacklist series, I recommend Katharine Hepburn and Spencer Tracy's first film together, Woman of the Year

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Wednesday, November 8

5:30 p.m.  You Can’t Take It With You (1938).  I haven’t seen this Oscar Best Picture winner in some time.

 

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Thursday, November 9

8:45 a.m.  Chimes at Midnight (1965).  Welles’ favourite picture and one that I think gets better each time I see it.

 

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Friday, November 10

11:15 a.m.  Vacation From Marriage (1945).  Robert Donat, Deborah Kerr and Glynis Johns are all fabulous in this Alexander Korda film.

 

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Saturday, November 11

When the schedule was first announced my pick of the day was ...

6 a.m.  One Man’s Journey (1933).  With Lionel Barrymore and May Robson.  Sounds like it might have been good.

But that has now been replaced by Dragon Seed (1944).  So I will go with

2 p.m.  Where Eagles Dare (1968).  With Richard Burton and Clint Eastwood.  I december seeing this on its release in a huge cinema.

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Sunday, November 12

My pick of the day when the schedule was announced was …  Night and the City (1952).  But that has been replaced by The Window (1949).  So I’ll go with …

2:45 a.m.  Summer With Monika (1953).  Ingmar Bergman film with Harriet Andersson.

 

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12 minutes ago, Bogie56 said:

Sunday, November 12

My pick of the day when the schedule was announced was …  Night and the City (1952).  But that has been replaced by The Window (1949).  So I’ll go with …

2:45 a.m.  Summer With Monika (1953).  Ingmar Bergman film with Harriet Andersson.

 

Ah Night and City was replaced? I wanted to see that. I guess I’ll have to see if it’s at the library. 

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really sorry I missed BOTH "Cinema Paradiso" & "Lonely are the Brave", 2 favs they rarely show

caught "Burmese Harp" by chance.........beautiful film!

(having to check schedule by computer every day is a DRAG!)

:(

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On 11/10/2017 at 7:44 AM, Bogie56 said:

Saturday, November 11

When the schedule was first announced my pick of the day was ...

6 a.m.  One Man’s Journey (1933).  With Lionel Barrymore and May Robson.  Sounds like it might have been good.

But that has now been replaced by Dragon Seed (1944).  So I will go with

 

"One Man's Journey" is a lovely film.  Too bad it was cancelled but it will turn up again one of these days.

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9 minutes ago, lydecker said:

"One Man's Journey" is a lovely film.  Too bad it was cancelled but it will turn up again one of these days.

It had been aired earlier in the week, early AM on Tuesday - I remember catching the start of it after watching one of the Fitzpatrick Travel Talks.

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A wonderful short film late tonight/early Sunday morning: The Red Balloon.

I'll also second Bogey's recommendation of Summer with Monika. It's interesting to see what Bergman was like just before he made the films which established his reputation. There's also Harriet Andersson, a fine young actress, and her occasional lack of clothes.

 

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Monday, November 13

9:45 p.m.  The Man I Married (1940).  “I Married a Nazi” might have been a more direct title.  With Joan Fontaine.

 

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14 hours ago, kingrat said:

A wonderful short film late tonight/early Sunday morning: The Red Balloon.

I'll also second Bogey's recommendation of Summer with Monika. It's interesting to see what Bergman was like just before he made the films which established his reputation. There's also Harriet Andersson, a fine young actress, and her occasional lack of clothes.

 

Think I will record Summer With Monika.  I will also record Bernardine, not for its quality but rather because I recall seeing it in theater when it came out and maybe once on TV since then.

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Tomorrow has a lot of great movies:

On the Town, my favorite of the three films that Gene Kelly and Frank Sinatra did together.  Plus, I'm a big fan of Vera-Ellen and she does a lot of great dancing here too.  

An Affair to Remember.  I like this movie for the scenes between Deborah Kerr and Cary Grant and for some reason I seem to like movies that take place on ships.  I also find the scenes with Kerr, Grant and Grant's grandmother to be really sweet.  The only part of this film I really dislike is the part with the children and that irritating song that they sing.

It Should Happen to You.  I love this film.  It features Jack Lemmon in his first film as a photographer who becomes smitten with Judy Holliday, an average woman who wants to make a name for herself in NYC.  Peter Lawford plays the man who is in love with Holliday, but finds himself competing with Lemmon for her affections.  Lawford always seems to play the guy who is in competition with the male lead for the leading lady's affections, but always seems to come up short.  This film is very timely for today, as you don't seem to actually have a skill to be famous, you just have to have a good publicist. Holliday made only a handful of films, and she really shines in this one.  I like Holliday, she's an unconventional leading lady, but she brings such a unique quality to her roles that she's a lot of fun to watch. 

The Tender Trap.  This film is silly and is definitely not an awards contender in the slightest, but I like it.  Sinatra plays a bachelor (who lives in this awesome bachelor pad) who has multiple girlfriends and is living the swinging bachelor life.  His very married friend, David Wayne, comes to visit from Indianapolis.  Wayne is bored with his domestic life and finds himself in awe and envious of Sinatra's harem of girlfriends.  Celeste Holm plays a friend of Sinatra's, a professional cellist, who wants to find the right man and settle down.  You also get the sense that she'd like to settle down with Sinatra.  Wayne finds himself enamored of Holm, as she most likely is more interesting and worldly than his wife.  Debbie Reynolds rounds out the main cast as a young ingenue who is cast in the latest play that Sinatra is casting.  Reynolds wants nothing more than to marry and have children and has her life planned out to a T.  She will marry at this age, have three children, the first child will be born in New York, but then she and her husband will move to the country to have two more children and raise their family.  Sinatra, Holm and Wayne are understandingly amused by Reynolds' naivety and wishful dreaming.  Sinatra finds her aspirations ridiculous, but he is oddly drawn to her.  Yes, Sinatra and Reynolds make no sense as a couple, but they work for me because they are at such opposite ends of the spectrum, relationship goal-wise, that they both need to meet in the middle in order to achieve happiness. 

Here Comes Mr. Jordan.  This is a great film starring Robert Montgomery and Claude Rains.  Montgomery stars as a prize-fighter who, due to the bumblings of a over-eager angel, is sent up to heaven fifty years before his time.  To make amends, Rains, the angel's boss, helps Montgomery locate a new body so that he can resume his life and career.  The body that Montgomery ends up taking over is that of a recently murdered wealthy banker.  The banker's wife and his secretary were those who were responsible for his death.  In his new body, Montgomery goes around undoing the wrongs that his previous body's inhabitant committed, such as selling bogus bonds.  

I'm planning on recording:

-The Age of Innocence, I've always wanted to see this movie. 

-Sunday in New York, I like Jane Fonda and have wanted to see more of her films.

-Force of Evil. I've been wanting to see more of John Garfield's movies.

-The Man I Married.  I've only seen a few of Joan Bennett's films, but based on what I've seen of her, I really like her, so I'd like to see this film.

 

 

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Tuesday, November 14

midnight.  Scarface (1932).   Fantastic Howard Hawks gangster film shot by Lee Garmes.  A restored 4K version was screened at the London Film Festival earlier this year.   Perhaps a new blu ray is in the offing?

 
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On 11/12/2017 at 1:00 PM, speedracer5 said:

-Force of Evil. I've been wanting to see more of John Garfield's movies.

Force of Evil is a must see.   To me the best Garfield noir and that is saying a lot: Yea Postman is great but FOE revolves all around the Garfield character;  a man who voluntarily walks into a noir world not realizing there is no back door.   

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7 hours ago, Bogie56 said:

Tuesday, November 14

midnight.  Scarface (1932).   Fantastic Howard Hawks gangster film shot by Lee Garmes.  A restored 4K version was screened at the London Film Festival earlier this year.   Perhaps a new blu ray is in the offing?

 

"I think these gangster pictures should be stopped. They are bad for the kiddies." ----- Al Capone

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On 11/12/2017 at 5:20 AM, Bogie56 said:

Monday, November 13

9:45 p.m.  The Man I Married (1940).  “I Married a Nazi” might have been a more direct title.  With Joan Fontaine.

 

" was one of the first aggressively anti-Nazi films made in the wake of the Invasion of Poland in September 1939 and it doesn't hold back on its portrait of Germany under the oppressive ideological rule of Adolf Hitler and the Nazi Party. "

http://www.tcm.com/tcmdb/title/82627/The-Man-I-Married/articles.html

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Wednesday, November 15

Good day to compare the number one and number two best films of all time in that Sight and Sound poll.

6 a.m.  Citizen Kane (1941) Welles with the great score by Bernard Herrmann.

8 p.m.  Vertigo (1958).  Hitchcock with the great score by Bernard Herrmann.

 
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21 minutes ago, Bogie56 said:

Wednesday, November 15

Good day to compare the number one and number two best films of all time in that Sight and Sound poll.

6 a.m.  Citizen Kane (1941) Welles with the great score by Bernard Herrmann.

8 p.m.  Vertigo (1958).  Hitchcock with the great score by Bernard Herrmann.

 

Both great movies with great Herrmann scores.

 

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21 minutes ago, Bogie56 said:

Wednesday, November 15

Good day to compare the number one and number two best films of all time in that Sight and Sound poll.

6 a.m.  Citizen Kane (1941) Welles with the great score by Bernard Herrmann.

8 p.m.  Vertigo (1958).  Hitchcock with the great score by Bernard Herrmann.

 

Both great movies with great Herrmann scores.

 

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15 hours ago, mr6666 said:

" was one of the first aggressively anti-Nazi films made in the wake of the Invasion of Poland in September 1939 and it doesn't hold back on its portrait of Germany under the oppressive ideological rule of Adolf Hitler and the Nazi Party. "

http://www.tcm.com/tcmdb/title/82627/The-Man-I-Married/articles.html

"The Man I Married" was a tough one to watch.  Really ahead of its time (for its time) as, as with so many of those types of films, a bit over the top but nice performances by Otto Kruger, Joan Bennett & Lloyd Nolan.  

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18 hours ago, mr6666 said:

" was one of the first aggressively anti-Nazi films made in the wake of the Invasion of Poland in September 1939 and it doesn't hold back on its portrait of Germany under the oppressive ideological rule of Adolf Hitler and the Nazi Party. "

http://www.tcm.com/tcmdb/title/82627/The-Man-I-Married/articles.html

 

Joan Fontaine? You mean Joan Bennett, right? Maybe Fontaine married a Nazi too.......

 

Sorry, this was meant for Bogie...

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Tomorrow, November 16, I have one to record:

No More Ladies (1935) 10:30 AM EST - A Joan Crawford movie I haven't seen, with Robert Montgomery, Franchot Tone, Charlie Ruggles, Edna May Oliver and Gail Patrick.

In primetime there's a spotlight on Marsha Mason. She's always been kind of "meh" to me, although I liked Cinderella Liberty and The Goodbye Girl a little. Audrey Rose (1977) at 2:15 AM EST, is a high-gloss reincarnation horror tale with Mason and Anthony Hopkins, from director Robert Wise. It has its fans.

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