Bogie56

HITS & MISSES: Yesterday, Today & Tomorrow on TCM

5,286 posts in this topic

I'm also recording Bus Riley's Back in Town, I am a big Ann-Margret fan and I haven't seen this film before.

Tomorrow, I'm recording:

 

Rafter Romance. A precode Ginger Rogers film that I haven't seen.

Rhapsody in Blue.  Like Lawrence, I like biopics.  I also somehow see this film everywhere (online, on the TCM schedule, etc.) and I've never seen it.  I like the cast: Joan Leslie, Alexis Smith, Charles Coburn, and Oscar Levant. 

One Way Passage.  I've seen this film before, but I can't remember it.  Recording it for William Powell and Kay Francis. 

Two for the Road.  I keep recording this film and things keep happening to my recording.  Maybe this time, it'll take. 

 

I recommend: Strangers on a Train, The Petrified Forest, Gigi, and Test Pilot

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4 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

 

Tomorrow I'm recording Rhapsody in Blue (1945). I like biopics, even if they're not very accurate.

 

I've always liked this film, beautifully mounted with, of course, some lovely passages of Gershwin's music. That Parisian nightclub scene with Hazel Scott singing and playing the piano to a number of Gershwin numbers, including "I Got Rhythm," remains a glorious tribute to the endearing quality of the man's music. (Too bad about cutaways to the cast spouting dialogue during Scott's presentation, though).

Having Oscar Levant around brings an authenticity lacking in the film's transparently cliche historically dubious screenplay. Not to mention the striking black and white cinematography of Sol Polito and Ernest Haller.

This film had to be the prestige highlight of Robert Alda's career. The film was produced in 1943 but not released until two years later, by which time Warners had pretty well decided it was no longer interested in promoting Alda's "star." Soon he would, rather convincingly, start to play oily dislikable characters in support (The Man I Love, with Ida Lupino). I always thought that Alda looked strikingly like Cary Grant. There the comparison ends, however, as far as talent and personality are concerned.

One of the real highlight sequences of this film is the montage collection of shots of the city of lights during the film's presentation of "An American in Paris," with some stunning photography plus, of course the lengthy climactic showcase of the title piece.

Forget the cornball quality of the screenplay and just enjoy the Gershwin music and striking visuals.

A shot from the wonderful sophistication of Hazel Scott's number . . .

hazel-scott-on-set-of-the-film-rhapsody-

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PENELOPE (1966): scheduled to air on Monday November 27 at 10:30 AM Eastern.

This Arthur Hiller directed comedy was a commercial and critical failure at the time of its release, but I enjoy the movie a lot.  It stars Natalie Wood in the title role of the kleptomaniac wife of a bank president. It was made at a time when Natalie Wood was at a professional peak but at a low point in her personal life. Although Wood by her own account had a difficult time making the movie, her charm shines in PENELOPE. Co-starring as the three men captivated by her charm are Ian Bannen as her husband, Dick Shawn as her psychiatrist and a pre-COLUMBO Peter Falk  as the police detective investigating the robbery of her husband's bank. Jonathan Winters appears in a flashback scene as Penelope's lecherous anthropology professor.

And then there are the Edith Head costumes!

And, oh yeah, the movie features Natalie Wood singing the ballad "The Sun Is Gray."

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26 minutes ago, HoldenIsHere said:

PENELOPE (1966): scheduled to air on Monday November 27 at 10:30 AM Eastern.

This Arthur Hiller directed comedy was a commercial and critical failure at the time of its release, but I enjoy the movie a lot.  It stars Natalie Wood in the title role of the kleptomaniac wife of a bank president. It was made at a time when Natalie Wood at a professional peak but at a low point in her personal life. Although Wood by her own account had a difficult time making the movie, her charm shines in PENELOPE. Co-starring as the three men captivated by her charm are Ian McBannen as her husband, Dick Shawn as her psychiatrist and a pre-COLUMBO Peter Falk  as the police detective investigating the robbery of her husband's bank. Jonathan Winters appears in a flashback scene as Penelope's lecherous anthropology professor.

And then there are the Edith Head costumes!

And, oh yeah, the movie features Natalie Wood singing the ballad "The Sun Is Gray."

I love this movie! It was living on my DVR because it's not available on DVD.  My DVR crashed, so I lost my copy.  I'm definitely recording this so I can get a copy again.  This is such a fun film. Natalie's charm and personality shine on screen and you would not know of her personal issues.  One of the best aspects of this film are the Edith Head costumes, including a great yellow dress that factors into the plot.  

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I second Holden's recommendation of Penelope.

I also really like Dark Passage.  While it may not be the best noir (though I really enjoy it, however, the impact of the ending is somewhat diminished after seeing it multiple times), I find the first person perspective very interesting and thought it was better executed than it was in Lady in the Lake.  I also love Lauren Bacall's San Francisco apartment and all of the shots of 1940s San Francisco.  Finally, Agnes Moorehead is excellent in this film.  Her scenes with Bogart are my favorite parts of the film.

Designing Woman.  I really enjoy this movie and I was so happy to find a copy of it at one of my used movie stores (it's out of print! Though it is included on TCM's Lauren Bacall set). This film features Lauren Bacall and Gregory Peck as two polar opposites living in different worlds who meet and marry after a whirlwind romance.  Bacall is a fashion designer who lives in a very large and very fancy Manhattan apartment.  She spends her evenings surrounded by artists, models, writers and other people in the art world.  Meanwhile, Peck is a sports reporter who lives in a small, very modest Manhattan apartment.  Bacall and Peck try to figure out how to fit into each other's world and also how to deal with past romantic partners.  This is a fun romantic comedy that also features a lot of slapstick comedy.  Bacall also wears beautiful costumes that only a former model, like Bacall, could carry off. 

I really did not like Marriage on the Rocks.  I liked the cast, but felt that Deborah Kerr did not fit in with Frank Sinatra and Dean Martin. 

I am recording The Cincinnati Kid.  I like the cast and I haven't seen this film yet, even though it seems to be scheduled often. 

I'm also recording Marriage is a Private Affair with Lana Turner and John Hodiak.  I'm somewhat indifferent to Lana, but I've liked Hodiak in the films that I've seen him in.  This looks like a fluffy, no-substance film, but sometimes fluffy films are all I'm in the mood for. 

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Monday, November 27/28

3:45 a.m.  Edge of the City (1957).  Good social issues film from Martin Ritt with stellar performances from John Cassavetes, Sidney Poitier and Ruby Dee.

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8 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

I love this movie! It was living on my DVR because it's not available on DVD.  My DVR crashed, so I lost my copy.  I'm definitely recording this so I can get a copy again.  This is such a fun film. Natalie's charm and personality shine on screen and you would not know of her personal issues.  One of the best aspects of this film are the Edith Head costumes, including a great yellow dress that factors into the plot.  

The yellow suit from PENELOPE that speedracer mentions ends up at the salon of "Princess" Sadaba.

Listen for Sadaba's line: "This dill pickle is nothing to throw rocks at."  

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Tuesday, November 28

11:15 a.m.  Jackass Mail (1942).  With Wallace Beery and Marjorie Main.  Let me guess.  Are they at each other’s throats?

8 p.m.  The Front (1976).  Zero Mostel should have won an Oscar for this.  The plight of his blacklisted character is drawn from things that happened to Mostel.

 
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Wednesday, November 29

8 p.m.  Winchester ’73  (1950).  I’ll go with this one again.  The entire cast is good.

 

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Thursday, November 30

An evening in Scotland …

8 p.m.  Wee Geordie (1954).  As I recall, this Bill Travers film is quite funny.  In Canada it is sadly replaced with Mary of Scotland (1936).  And the next film is replaced with Bonnie Scotland (1935).  Well, at least they didn’t replace them with Irish films!  ‘Scotland, Ireland, what’s the difference’ if you were baiting Mike Myers.

10 p.m.  High and Dry (1954).  Only in America I’m afraid.  I saw this in England last year under its title, The Maggie.  Good Alexander Mackendrick comedy that highlights the Scottish quirks.  It’s influence can still be seen years later in …

3:45 a.m.  Local Hero (1983).  Really nice Bill Forsythe film that takes place in a small coastal Scottish village.

 
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On 9/24/2017 at 11:16 AM, Barton_Keyes said:

 

Eddie Muller has said on Twitter that he's trying to get NIGHTMARE ALLEY on Noir Alley sometime in 2018.

I like this film too.  It has a very unique role for Tyrone Power and Helen Walker.  I hope they will air it soon in

2018.

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13 hours ago, Bogie56 said:

Thursday, November 30

An evening in Scotland …

8 p.m.  Wee Geordie (1954).  As I recall, this Bill Travers film is quite funny.  In Canada it is sadly replaced with Mary of Scotland (1936).  And the next film is replaced with Bonnie Scotland (1935).  Well, at least they didn’t replace them with Irish films!  ‘Scotland, Ireland, what’s the difference’ if you were baiting Mike Myers.

10 p.m.  High and Dry (1954).  Only in America I’m afraid.  I saw this in England last year under its title, The Maggie.  Good Alexander Mackendrick comedy that highlights the Scottish quirks.  It’s influence can still be seen years later in …

3:45 a.m.  Local Hero (1983).  Really nice Bill Forsythe film that takes place in a small coastal Scottish village.

 

i have seen the first three and find them very charming, especially Wee Geordie.  I missed Local Hero but will try it some time.  The Scottish humor is nice to see.  It is always annoying to have a film scheduled and then it is replaced by something else so I hope you have a chance of seeing them later.

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Friday, December 1

Cary Grant day.

10:15 a.m.  Arsenic and Old Lace (1944).  With a great supporting cast: Jack Carson, Raymond Massey, Peter Lorre, Josephine Hull, Jean Adair and John Alexander.

 
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12/1

Cary Grant day.

I've seen most of these Cary Grant films.  I second the recommendation for Arsenic and Old Lace.  I also really like Mr. Lucky featuring Grant and Laraine Day.  Day is someone who I discovered via Mr. Lucky.  I have since seen her in The Locket with Robert Mitchum and thought she was great in that film.  Mr. Lucky and The Locket are two films that I just acquired during Warner Brothers Archives' excellent Black Friday sale.  I really like Mr. Lucky because it features Grant in a slightly atypical role, in that he's the "bad guy" in the film, but his Cary Grant persona is in full swing in this film.

I didn't particularly care for Dream Wife.  I don't know what it was about that film.  Is it just me, or did Cary Grant seem very thin in that film? I wonder if he was sick.  

My other pick is during the Christmas movie marathon--Never Say Goodbye.  This film stars Errol Flynn and Eleanor Parker as a reluctantly divorced couple whose seven-year old daughter, Flip, desperately wants to see back together.  In this film, you get the sense that it was Parker's mother who pushed for the divorce voicing her constant suspicions about Flynn--suspicions which stemmed from Flynn's career as a commercial artist.  Errol agrees with Flip and wants nothing more than to win Parker back. 

Sure, it's not an award contender and it's not even among Flynn or Parker's best performances, but I love this film.  It's fluffy, it's sappy, but whatever.  I enjoy it.  Flynn sings in the film.  He dresses like Santa.  He participates in a parody of the mirror scene in Duck Soup.  He does a hilarious Bogart impression (which Bogart's real voice dubbed in).  Parker is gorgeous.  Flynn is gorgeous.  Flip is funny.  SZ Sakall is funny.  Hattie McDaniel is funny.   

I'm recording:

Once Upon a Honeymoon.  I haven't seen this Cary Grant or Ginger Rogers film before.  I recorded this once before, but for some reason, my recording was split into two and then I didn't end up watching it before I lost my DVR.  Take two.

Every Girl Should Be Married.  I haven't seen this film before.  In addition to Grant, this film also features Franchot Tone in one of his many "other man" roles.  This film also introduced Grant to Betsy Drake whom he would marry.  Diana Lynn who plays Lucy in The Major and the Minor also appears in this film.  It'll be interesting to see her in an adult role and not as a teenager.  

Room For One More.  This is another Cary Grant film that I haven't seen.  I've seen most of them too.

Tenth Avenue Angel.  This is a Margaret O'Brien film that I haven't seen.  It sounds sappy, but I'll give it a try.

Period of Adjustment.  This is a Jane Fonda film that I haven't seen.  I also like 1960s comedies.

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Like Speedracer, I'm a fan of Mr. Lucky. Excellent performances by Cary Grant, Laraine Day, and Charles Bickford. Also a fan of None But the Lonely Heart. Arsenic and Old Lace does indeed a supporting cast to, er, kill for.

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Saturday, December 2

11:15 p.m.  Mad Love (1935).  Peter Lorre is amazing in this one.  And what a look!

5761963375_6c43d61ee0.jpg
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Sunday, December 3/4

Amarcord_6_solich.jpg?1468487590

3 a.m.  Amarcord (1973).  Oscar winning Best Foreign Language feature from Federico Fellini.  Music by Nino Rota.

 
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On ‎11‎/‎30‎/‎2017 at 7:06 AM, Bogie56 said:

Friday, December 1

Cary Grant day.

10:15 a.m.  Arsenic and Old Lace (1944).  With a great supporting cast: Jack Carson, Raymond Massey, Peter Lorre, Josephine Hull, Jean Adair and John Alexander.

 

This is such a hilarious film. One can hardly have blamed Mortimer if he really HAD gone cuckoo after all he went through that day.

Not the type of film you would expect from Frank Capra, but a classic nonetheless.

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Monday, December 4

10 a.m.  So You Think You’re Not Guilty (1950).  An interesting choice to precede Cool Hand Luke with.  Short subject about a man receiving a 10 year sentence for a simple violation.

fc9.jpg

9:45 p.m.  Fat City (1972).  Good John Huston boxing film featuring Stacey Keach and Susan Tyrrell.

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Tuesday, December 5

Fritz Lang day.

220px-DrMabuse1933.jpg

8 a.m.  The Testament of Dr. Mabuse (1933).  Solid crime film.

 
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Wednesday, December 6

8 p.m. and 2:45 a.m. It’s Always About the Story: Conversations With Alan Ladd, Jr. (2016)

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Thursday, December 7/8

165dc48fb19ee8dcedc6cb433e94822b--busby-

4:30 a.m.  Dames (1934).  Musical with Joan Blondell, Dick Powell and Ruby Keeler.

 
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On 12/5/2017 at 10:33 AM, Bogie56 said:

Wednesday, December 6

8 p.m. and 2:45 a.m. It’s Always About the Story: Conversations With Alan Ladd, Jr. (2016)

Scott FeinbergVerified account @ScottFeinberg 16h16 hours ago

 
 

WEDNESDAY NIGHT: @TCM will be saluting legendary Hollywood producer/exec Alan Ladd, Jr. starting at 8p EST/5p PST with @Stanley100 Isaacs' fine new doc about him, followed by THE RIGHT STUFF, CHARIOTS OF FIRE and the doc again. All cohosted by Stanley & @BenMank77. Don't miss it!

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Friday, December 8

Well, cut me liver it's ...

christmascarol1.jpg.CROP.article250-medi

8 p.m.  A Christmas Carol (1951).  My favourite version with Alastair Sim.  Last year this wasn’t on the Canadian schedule but it appears it is this year.

 

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Looking forward to Lady On A Train, airing Friday Dec 8, as well. I don't think this Deanna Durbin film has been shown before on TCM, has it? I wish they showed more of her films. Ah, Universal...

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