Bogie56

HITS & MISSES: Yesterday, Today & Tomorrow on TCM

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Although I have Sim's '51 movie on disc, I'll probably "nip along smartly" to the telly and settle down with it. ;)

I do usually view it more than once each Christmas season. :)

Sepiatone

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Bogie56 said: 8 p.m. A Christmas Carol (1951). My favourite version with Alastair Sim. Last year this wasn’t on the Canadian schedule but it appears it is this year.

Our film group is screening this next Monday...a newly restored version. Please let us know if TCM broadcasts the restored version. It should be easy to tell, as the old one was pretty high contrast as if a second (or third) generation print.

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5 hours ago, sagebrush said:

Looking forward to Lady On A Train, airing Friday Dec 8, as well. I don't think this Deanna Durbin film has been shown before on TCM, has it? I wish they showed more of her films. Ah, Universal...

TCM showed the film last year. 

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6 hours ago, sagebrush said:

Looking forward to Lady On A Train, airing Friday Dec 8, as well. I don't think this Deanna Durbin film has been shown before on TCM, has it? I wish they showed more of her films. Ah, Universal...

It's not a premier, but I think it doesn't turn up very often - it was shown back in December 2015 as part of a spotlight on movies set during the Christmas season.

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Saturday, December 9

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3:45 a.m.  Scenes From a Class Struggle In Beverly Hills (1989).  I haven’t seen this Paul Bartel film and I guess it will remain that way for the time being.  This is replaced in Canada with Killer Party (1986).

 

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On 12/7/2017 at 6:10 AM, TikiSoo said:

Bogie56 said: 8 p.m. A Christmas Carol (1951). My favourite version with Alastair Sim. Last year this wasn’t on the Canadian schedule but it appears it is this year.

Our film group is screening this next Monday...a newly restored version. Please let us know if TCM broadcasts the restored version. It should be easy to tell, as the old one was pretty high contrast as if a second (or third) generation print.

I think that they're showing the same print as previously shown - it is somewhat bright (especially foreheads) in places, but quite sharp & detailed. Do you know who did the restoration of the version your group will be screening?

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6 hours ago, limey said:

I think that they're showing the same print as previously shown - it is somewhat bright (especially foreheads) in places, but quite sharp & detailed. Do you know who did the restoration of the version your group will be screening?

I know VCI released the restored Blu-ray in North America (and has rescued a lot of public-domain 50's British films), but not sure on who restored the film source print.  Usually, if the film source gets one "official" restoration, that's the version that goes into the vault.

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Coming on shortly is the precode Maltese Falcon from 1931.  Horror fans, fans of kinky sex movies and fans of the weird in general may want to check out Private Parts on the TCM Underground tonight.  It's directed by Paul Bartel (of Eating Raoul fame).  I saw it in the late 1970s-early1980s and haven't seen it since so I am looking forward to seeing this one again.  Recommended.

It's Fay Bainter during prime time tonight but where the heck is White Banners?

All in all, it looks like a good day/night on TCM.

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Sunday, December 10

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2 a.m.  Nine Days of One Year (1962).  Russian sci-fi film with Innokentiy Smoktunovskiy who was terrific as Hamlet two years later.

 
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Monday, December 11

groucho.jpg

2:30 a.m.  Horse Feathers (1932).  This could be written for today’s Washington …

I don't know what they have to say

It makes no difference anyway

Whatever it is, I'm against it

No matter what it is

Or who commenced it

I'm against it

 

Your proposition may be good

But let's have one thing understood

Whatever it is, I'm against it

And even when you've changed it

Or condensed it

I'm against it

 

I'm opposed to it

On general principles

I'm opposed to it

(He's opposed to it)

(In fact, he says he's opposed to it)

 

For months before my son was born

I used to yell from night to morn

"Whatever it is, I'm against it"

And I've kept yelling

Since I first commenced it

"I'm against it"

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It's kind of late now because it has already started, but I am recording morning's Noir Alley selection, The Breaking Point with John Garfield.  I understand that this is another adaptation of Hemingway's To Have and Have Not.  It'll be interesting to see how this film compares with the Bogart/Bacall version.  I think I may have picked up the novel at a book sale awhile back--if not I'm sure the library has it.  It'd be interesting to see the differences between the two films and the source material. 

I really like John Garfield but have only seen a handful of his films.  Thankfully, TCM has aired many of his films recently, so I have a few of films to get through (Pride of the Marines, Force of Evil, and He Ran All the Way). 

Harvey is one of those films that seems to be scheduled all the time and I see the DVD everywhere and I've never seen it.  Maybe I should watch it so I can see what all the fuss is about.  I think I'll record it. 

Fear.  This is the last film that Ingrid Bergman made with Roberto Rossellini.  As you all know Bergman and Rossellini's romance caused a big scandal.  This film may be interesting to see and it's really short too (79 mins). 

My picks for today:

Holiday Affair.  I just watched this for the first time the other day and I really enjoyed it.  It's a different side of Robert Mitchum than we normally see, yet his persona ("Baby I don't care") is fully intact.  Mitchum and Janet Leigh made a great pairing in this low key, nice Christmas drama. This film will definitely make it into my normal Christmas film rotation.

Meet Me in St. Louis.  I don't think I need to say much about this film other than it's a classic.  It only features Christmas in a small segment of the film, but it is an important part of the film and is also responsible for the introduction of the classic Christmas tune, "Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas." Judy Garland has never looked better and the costumes in this film are gorgeous.  I also love Mary Astor's crazy striped robe thing that she wears in the scene where she hears that Garland is planning on bowing out of the Christmas dance. 
 

Quote

 

ESTHER: "I'm going to let John Truett kiss me tonight." 

ROSE: "Esther Smith!"

ESTHER: "Well if we're going to get married, I may as well start it." 

ROSE: "Nice girls don't let men kiss them until after they're engaged. Men don't want the bloom rubbed off." 

ESTHER: "Personally, I think I have too much bloom. Maybe that's the trouble with me." 

 

Get it, girl! 

I love Meet Me in St. Louis. Sure it's sticky sweet and a little corny, but frankly I think the world needs more of that here and there.  I also love when Rose's beau, Warren Sheffield, storms into the Smith house and says: "ROSE SMITH! I LOVE YOU!" 

12/11

Tomorrow, I recommend Scarlet Street.  I just saw this noir recently and found it fascinating.  Edward G. Robinson plays the mousy characters so well, which is a definite contrast to the rough gangsters he played in the beginning of his career and even the self assured Barton Keyes character in Double Indemnity.  Robinson definitely deserved more accolades during his career.  Maybe he flew too much under the radar.  Joan Bennett plays the femme fatale in this film so well, you never really quite know what her deal is and which side she's on.  Dan Duryea appears here in one of his typical sleazy roles, but he is so good in them and Scarlet Street is no exception. I found the ending of the film to be quite atypical for a production code era film.  Has this film received a proper DVD release? I believe it was/is in public domain.

I'm recording: The Last Time I Saw Paris, this is also a public domain film that I always see included in those: "50 Best Films of the 1950s" collections of poor quality public domain films.  I haven't seen this film yet and it sounds interesting. 

I'm also recording The Constant Nymph.  I am trying to see more Joan Fontaine films.  Sometimes she's interesting and sometimes she's a bit boring.  However, there are films where her delicate flower persona fits and works in the film.  I liked her in Suspicion and Rebecca because she was constantly in fear.  A strong persona like Bette Davis or Katharine Hepburn wouldn't have worked in either of these roles.  But I digress... I am also interested in 'Nymph' because I also like Alexis Smith.  There are some other interesting cast members in this film like Peter Lorre and Charles Coburn, so I'd like to see how they fit into this film. I am less interested in Brenda Marshall, because she has a very bland personality.  The Sea Hawk would be even better if they had gotten someone a little brassier to play Errol's leading lady. 

 

 

 

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