Bogie56

HITS & MISSES: Yesterday, Today & Tomorrow on TCM

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tonight at 8:00, a PARAMOUNT title I am unfamiliar with: SKYLARK (1941) with Claudette Colbert, Ray Milland, and Brian Aherne.

Millandskylark.jpg

it sounds like an interesting premise, and i'm really behind on my Paramount films as they rarely show up on TCM. I don't know if the Johnny Mercer song was written for this movie or if the movie was inspired by the song or they are mutually exclusive, but i'll be checking it out.

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2 hours ago, Bogie56 said:

Tuesday, January 30/31

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1:45 a.m.  North by Northwest (1959).  I saw this last October on the big screen and you have to admit, it is darned good.

This was the last "light entertainment" Hitchcock film, and, also, the last film of the Master that is a favourite of mine.

His films started getting darker with his next effort, Psycho (probably his most famous and celebrated film today-undoubtedly the one most discussed on these boards). I like Psycho, as well as The Birds. I just don't find them as much fun as the best of his earlier films (Foreign Correspondent, Shadow of a Doubt- though there is certainly darkness in this film, Rear Window, NBNW, etc.).

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11 hours ago, Gershwin fan said:

In 20 minutes Chaplin's A Woman of Paris is on. A good film he directed without his little tramp character in it. After that is In Vanda's Room - a Portuguese documentary on heroin users.

In Vanda's Room isn't what I would call a documentary. Each camera set-up seems intended to wow Film School 101 students. A movie buddy whose opinion I respect calls the movie neo-realism, but I found it arty and pretentious to the nth degree (at least as much of the movie as I could stomach).

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Wednesday, January 31

MyBrothersWedding_1024x1024.jpg?v=133244

8 p.m.  My Brother’s Wedding (1983).  By Charles Burnett.  This spot was TBA when the schedule was announced.

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10 p.m.  Straight Time (1978).  Pretty good film with Dustin Hoffman and Theresa Russell.

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23 hours ago, kingrat said:

In Vanda's Room isn't what I would call a documentary. Each camera set-up seems intended to wow Film School 101 students. A movie buddy whose opinion I respect calls the movie neo-realism, but I found it arty and pretentious to the nth degree (at least as much of the movie as I could stomach).

Yeah, I don't think the composition was really good. The screen was so dark and poorly focused most of the time I couldn't even tell what was going on.

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On ‎1‎/‎29‎/‎2018 at 10:43 AM, TomJH said:

This was the last "light entertainment" Hitchcock film, and, also, the last film of the Master that is a favourite of mine.

His films started getting darker with his next effort, Psycho (probably his most famous and celebrated film today-undoubtedly the one most discussed on these boards). I like Psycho, as well as The Birds. I just don't find them as much fun as the best of his earlier films (Foreign Correspondent, Shadow of a Doubt- though there is certainly darkness in this film, Rear Window, NBNW, etc.).

I prefer PSYCHO and THE BIRDS to FOREIGN CORRESPONDENT, REAR WINDOW, and even NORTH BY NORTHWEST (fine films that they are) and consider them equals to SHADOW OF A DOUBT and VERTIGO (though I will take any of these films over SUSPICION any day).

But I may be in the minority on this....the Hitchcock film that keeps drawing me in lately is REBECCA. I know that Hitchcock didn't have as much control on that one as he would have liked (same with SUSPICION) but you can't go wrong with Laurence Olivier and Joan Fontaine, and Judith Anderson is just brilliant as the ice queen maid Mrs. Danvers. Even though his role is very minor, George Sanders still manages to steal the scenes he's in.

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On ‎1‎/‎29‎/‎2018 at 7:43 AM, TomJH said:

This was the last "light entertainment" Hitchcock film, and, also, the last film of the Master that is a favourite of mine.

His films started getting darker with his next effort, Psycho (probably his most famous and celebrated film today-undoubtedly the one most discussed on these boards). I like Psycho, as well as The Birds. I just don't find them as much fun as the best of his earlier films (Foreign Correspondent, Shadow of a Doubt- though there is certainly darkness in this film, Rear Window, NBNW, etc.).

I agree with you.  While I like Psycho and The Birds, I prefer his more "glamorous" (if you will) films starring the big stars of the classic era.  His Rebecca through North By Northwest era is probably my favorite time of his career.  Though I do love Psycho too, but it's definitely the beginning of a different type of film era for Hitchcock. 

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IN RE: HITCHCOCK

During my time away, I watched FRENZY on TCM and LOVED IT (in spite of the fact that I did not expect to at all.)

Really just an excellent film.

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21 hours ago, Bogie56 said:

Wednesday, January 31

MyBrothersWedding_1024x1024.jpg?v=133244

8 p.m.  My Brother’s Wedding (1983).  By Charles Burnett.  This spot was TBA when the schedule was announced.

 

" Charles Burnett made an auspicious feature debut in 1977 with Killer of Sheep, a powerful, poetic portrait of life in the Los Angeles ghetto Watts which he made as his thesis film for the filmmaking program at UCLA. The B&W feature gained international recognition at the 1981 Berlin Film Festival, where it won the Critics' Prize, and was chosen as a "national treasure" and put on the National Film Registry in 1990. It's a landmark of African American filmmaking and American independent cinema, yet it never received a theatrical release until 2007, ...

http://www.tcm.com/tcmdb/title/84293/My-Brother-s-Wedding/articles.html

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Thursday, February 1/2

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4:15 a.m.  Born Free (1966).  Not the best time to be showing this classic family film.  With real life married couple Virginia McKenna (1931-) and Bill Travers (1922-1994) and great John Barry score.  Fans may wish to check out To Walk With Lions (1999) which is a sequel of sorts and features Richard Harris and Honor Blackman as the the divorced couple.

Virginia McKenna in Africa ...

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McKenna and Travers became animal rights activists after the making of this film.  This from wikipedia ...

McKenna and Travers had been greatly affected by the plight of wild animals after starring together in the 1966 film Born Free which told the story of George and Joy Adamson as they returned Elsa the Lioness to the wilds of Africa.[2] They appeared in several more films about animals and produced wildlife and anti-zoo documentaries for television.

The Born Free Foundation Limited was officially established on 20 July 1998, and as an umbrella organisation it consists today of the Zoo Check Campaign, Elefriends Campaign, Wolf Campaign, Dolphin Campaign, Primate Campaign, Big Cat Campaign, and the Bear Campaign. It is a charity registered in England & Wales.[3]

The Born Free Foundation undertakes animal welfare, conservation and public awareness campaigns to prevent animal abuse and to keep wildlife in its natural habitat. Its logo is a lion, which its website states is a likeness of Elsa.

The foundation, which is part of the International Tiger Coalition (ITC),[4] has two big cat sanctuaries in South Africa at the Shamwari Game Reserve[5] in the Eastern Cape.[citation needed]

 
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Friday, February 2

the-old-man-and-the-sea-md-web.jpg

9:45 a.m.  The Old Man and the Sea (1958).  The Ernest Hemingway story with Spencer Tracy.

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Ugh. Oscar month. 

We’re having a Mickey Rooney debate over in the “I just watched”  thread. At 2 o’clock today, one of his films from the beginning of his career decline is on- THE STRIP (1951)

It’s good, and he’s good in it – apparently he walked off the set during filming because of a clash with the director, a story he infamously told Robert Osborne in an interview years later. Even if you don’t like Mickey Rooney, it’s a definite must for the music which is superb ( there are long musical interlude scenes) Oddly enough, the Oscar nomination it got was for the song A KISS TO BUILD A DREAM ON, Which I seem to recall looking up and discovering was actually written before it’s inclusion in the movie (And therefore it would be in eligible under today’s rules.)

 

**Anyone who wants to correct me on this fact, go ahead. I’m posting this without googling first.

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Ps- That’s a gorgeous poster for THE OLD MAN AND THE SEA.  If only the movie was one-third as good. 

(I like to think of it as THE OLD MAN AND THE REAR PROJECTION SCREEN...At this stage of Spence’s career, you werent gonna get him out on the ocean. Hell, You’re probably lucky if you got him to show up by noon.)

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3 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

Ps- That’s a gorgeous poster for THE OLD MAN AND THE SEA.  If only the movie was one-third as good. 

(I like to think of it as THE OLD MAN AND THE REAR PROJECTION SCREEN...At this stage of Spence’s career, you werent gonna get him out on the ocean. Hell, You’re probably lucky if you got him to show up by noon.)

At least if he fell in the water, he'd probably float.

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I did catch THE STRIP, sorry to say I didn't share Lorna's enthusiasm for it. The music score is great, but that alone isn't enough for me to give it another look.

Think Mickey was getting too picky about what kind of scripts to choose from around this time, either that or a bad agent giving him bad advice, or maybe a bit of egotism in him thinking he could make ANY movie watchable no matter how bad the script (he can't, at least not IMO). Or it could have been all three, who knows. 

All I know is that he would never quite regain the popularity he had achieved from the 30's to late 40's. He did score a once-in-awhile bullseye with a hit movie occasionally (BREAKFAST AT TIFFANY'S, in spite of his horrible imitation of a Japanese man, IT'S A MAD, MAD, MAD, MAD WORLD, which I do find hilarious, but again it's in spite of Mickey rather than because, THE BLACK STALLION, which I will admit he did turn in a fine performance as well as in his Emmy-winning performance in BILL).

I have to admit though, my heart broke for him when I found out about his abuse at the hands of his stepson some years ago. No one, despite their faults, deserved to be treated as monsterously as he was by people who should have had his back. I understand his stepson stole and then sold the Emmy he won for BILL, and his supposedly devoted wife Jan was in on it.

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1 minute ago, Bethluvsfilms said:

I did catch THE STRIP, sorry to say I didn't share Lorna's enthusiasm for it. The music score is great, but that alone isn't enough for me to give it another look.

Think Mickey was getting too picky about what kind of scripts to choose from around this time, either that or a bad agent giving him bad advice, or maybe a bit of egotism in him thinking he could make ANY movie watchable no matter how bad the script (he can't, at least not IMO). Or it could have been all three, who knows. 

All I know is that he would never quite regain the popularity he had achieved from the 30's to late 40's. He did score a once-in-awhile bullseye with a hit movie occasionally (BREAKFAST AT TIFFANY'S, in spite of his horrible imitation of a Japanese man, IT'S A MAD, MAD, MAD, MAD WORLD, which I do find hilarious, but again it's in spite of Mickey rather than because, THE BLACK STALLION, which I will admit he did turn in a fine performance as well as in his Emmy-winning performance in BILL).

I have to admit though, my heart broke for him when I found out about his abuse at the hands of his stepson some years ago. No one, despite their faults, deserved to be treated as monsterously as he was by people who should have had his back. I understand his stepson stole and then sold the Emmy he won for BILL, and his supposedly devoted wife Jan was in on it.

I saw it too and I agree with you. I didn't hate it but it just seemed like an average gangster movie. Nothing about it really stuck out to me as interesting and it had too many music numbers. <_< 

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Saturday, February 3

“You owe me money!”

thehustler_c_scott_newman1.jpg

1 a.m.  The Hustler (1961).  Great Robert Rossen film with Paul Newman, Piper Laurie, George C. Scott and Jackie Gleason.

 
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THE HUSTLER is a great movie, Paul is just great in this, as is Piper, Gleason and Scott.

Though I understand Scott didn't want to have anything to do with the Oscars, even back then, but that didn't stop the Academy from nominating for Supporting Actor in this one.

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The Hustler has one of Paul Newman's best roles, the direction and cinematography are first-rate, and I love every minute Piper Laurie and George C. Scott are on screen, but did the final pool match have to be as long as, oh, I don't know, the entire Lord of the Rings trilogy?

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Sunday, February 4

Zorba+09+ANTHONY+QUINN-LILA+KEDROVA.jpg

10 p.m.  Zorba the Greek (1964).  Fine picture with Anthony Quinn and Alan Bates.  Oscar winning supporting actress Lila Kedrova is a stand out.  Apparently she had to learn her lines phonetically.

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21 hours ago, kingrat said:

The Hustler has one of Paul Newman's best roles, the direction and cinematography are first-rate, and I love every minute Piper Laurie and George C. Scott are on screen, but did the final pool match have to be as long as, oh, I don't know, the entire Lord of the Rings trilogy?

Yes, even I have to admit that last match did drag on....but you know the filmmakers. they have to drag on the suspense as long as possible!

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14 hours ago, Bogie56 said:

Sunday, February 4

Zorba+09+ANTHONY+QUINN-LILA+KEDROVA.jpg

10 p.m.  Zorba the Greek (1964).  Fine picture with Anthony Quinn and Alan Bates.  Oscar winning supporting actress Lila Kedrova is a stand out.  Apparently she had to learn her lines phonetically.

I just want to add that the black-and-white cinematography is absolutely superb and would be worth watching for that reason alone. Quinn, Bates, Lila Kedrova, and Irene Papas are four others.

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Monday, February 5

Oscar winning documentary day.

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8 p.m.  An Inconvenient Truth (2006).  Al Gore’s climate change film.  I recently saw An Inconvenient Sequel (2017) which is pretty good too.

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I'd rather watch The Hellstrom Chronicle.  It's more truthful.

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12 hours ago, Bogie56 said:

Monday, February 5

Oscar winning documentary day.

52536216?wid=520&hei=520&fmt=pjpeg

8 p.m.  An Inconvenient Truth (2006).  Al Gore’s climate change film.  I recently saw An Inconvenient Sequel (2017) which is pretty good too.

So where was this charming eloquent Al Gore during the 2000 presidential campaign? During the campaign he was awkward, geeky, and just indescribably "off". I remember after the election somebody analyzed his public appearances and said that one of his problems was that his body language was out of sync with his speech. For instance if he said something like "we must all come together" he would spread his arms apart rather than bring his hands together - little things that you don't really notice but add up subliminally.

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