Bogie56

HITS & MISSES: Yesterday, Today & Tomorrow on TCM

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I just saw something odd ( at least I think so.) While watching THE MOONLIGHTER this morning, 45 minutes into the film there is a title card for an intermission. The film resumes promptly, but the entire duration of the film is only 1.5 hours! Isn't it strange that there would have been an intermission?

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8 hours ago, sagebrush said:

I just saw something odd ( at least I think so.) While watching THE MOONLIGHTER this morning, 45 minutes into the film there is a title card for an intermission. The film resumes promptly, but the entire duration of the film is only 1.5 hours! Isn't it strange that there would have been an intermission?

No. Same thing happens with Robot Monster, and that film is only 66 minutes long.

nB3H1Ip.jpg

It gave people a chance to run out of the theater instead of sticking around and watching this ****.

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Tuesday, April 10

hammer-sangster-hysteria-poster.jpg

4:15 p.m.  Hysteria (1965).  A not so memorable amnesia picture.

 
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40 minutes ago, Bogie56 said:

Tuesday, April 10

hammer-sangster-hysteria-poster.jpg

4:15 p.m.  Hysteria (1965).  A not so memorable amnesia picture.

 

Based on the credits listed in the poster,  I guess that isn't Phyllis Diller pointing the gun.

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Wednesday, April 11

Errol Flynn day!

U-S-Scooter-Museum.jpg

11:30 a.m.  Dive Bomber (1941).  This is one that has eluded me.

 
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58 minutes ago, Bogie56 said:

Wednesday, April 11

Errol Flynn day!

U-S-Scooter-Museum.jpg

11:30 a.m.  Dive Bomber (1941).  This is one that has eluded me.

 

Actually, it is the 2nd of 4 "Michael Curtiz Days", but that includes a great deal of Flynn.

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1 hour ago, Bogie56 said:

Wednesday, April 11

Errol Flynn day!

U-S-Scooter-Museum.jpg

11:30 a.m.  Dive Bomber (1941).  This is one that has eluded me.

 

I think I own every film being shown during Errol Flynn day, but I know what I'm doing tomorrow night!!  Dive Bomber is good, I think it is a wee bit long, but it is a good film.  The Technicolor is gorgeous and there are many great shots of San Diego.  Not that this would interest you as much (lol), but Flynn wears a variety of different uniforms throughout the film, including his doctor scrubs, and he looks great in all of them.  I was curious about all the different uniforms he wears, as I didn't realize that the Navy wore so many different colors and varieties of uniform--I figure each one might have a different meaning or what not. 

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Errol Flynn day indeed but, let's face it, folks, his films with Michael Curtiz remain the lion's share of the titles from his career best remembered today.

Wednesday April 11 8pm (EST) The Adventures of Robin Hood

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10pm (EST) Captain Blood

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12:15am (EST) Dodge City

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2:15am (EST) The Charge of the Light Brigade

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4:15 am (EST) The Sea Hawk

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Perhaps many of us take these titles a bit for granted because of the frequency of their play on TCM, as well as their availability on DVD. That shouldn't stop us from appreciating the fact that these five films, arguably the best that the director-star duo of Curtiz and Flynn ever produced, still rank among the most enjoyable films of their light hearted adventurous type ever made.

Flynn brings dash and romance and the hard driving Curtiz brings a dynamic visual flourish to the proceedings. And let's not forget, too, the stirring musical accompaniment of these films thanks to Erich Wolfgang Korngold and Max Steiner. The scores for Robin Hood and The Sea Hawk alone rank among the best the movies have ever given us.

 

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On 4/9/2018 at 9:26 AM, scsu1975 said:

No. Same thing happens with Robot Monster, and that film is only 66 minutes long.

nB3H1Ip.jpg

If you look up The Moonlighter on IMDb, you'll see that it, like Robot Monster, was shown in 3-D, and 50's 3-D of any feature length needed an intermission, since it took longer than usual to set up projectors for the second half.

(Yep, the things you learn when you've got a Playstation, a 3DTV, and rent the restored Kino Lorber disks.)  B)

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The Charge of the Light Brigade (1936) is one of the best of the British Empire epics produced by the Hollywood studios, with its final hoff pounding, canon blasting climax one of the classic moments of synchronization between Max Steiner's musical score and the gradually increased pacing of the visuals (thanks to second unit director Breezy Eason and Mike Curtiz).

However the film is also outrageous for its use of the "running W," a wire attached to the back legs of many of the horses in the charge sequence. The animal would run flat out then be cruelly brought to the ground when the wire reached its end. It was dangerous for both riders and horses, and many of the horses suffered broken legs and were put down afterward. A perfectionist like Curtiz didn't give a damn (would you expect anything different after his treatment of the extras in the flood sequence in Noah's Ark?).

Flynn, an expert horseman and animal lover, wrote in his autobiography about this cruel practice and said that he lodged a complaint with the Society for Cruelty to Animals (or some such name) regarding the treatment of the horses on this film.

This is also the film that David Niven wrote about in which Curtiz, in asking for riderless steeds, shouted in his mangled English, 'BRING ON THE EMPTY HORSES!" Flynn, Niven and many others broke up on the spot.

Curtiz at one point fumed at the actors, "You bastards think I know F*** Nothing! Well I want you to know I know F*** All!"

Flynn, who did much of his own riding in the final charge sequence, would later call Charge the physically toughest film that he ever made.

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Thursday, April 12

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12:15 p.m.  Gaslight (1944).  With Charles Boyer and Ingrid Bergman.  It is interesting that the media is now using the term ‘gaslighting’ to describe trying to confuse the truth.  How many people would know the origins of that term?

 
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for those of you with DVRS (or insomnia) THE CHARGE OF THE LIGHT BRIGADE (1936) is coming on at 2:15 in the morning as part of the spotlight on Curtiz.

I really wish they had shown tonight's line-up of his films with Flynn in chronological order for a variety of reasons (not the least of which is the fact that, GREAT AS IT IS, THE ADVENTURES OF ROBIN HOOD is on ALL THE TIME.)

LIGHT BRIGADE is a fascinating movie- very, very different from the usual Curtiz/DeHavilland/Flynn historical pairings. It's gorgeously shot and downright SHOCKING in its violence (it may be the most violent American film made in the 1930s.)

 

 

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2 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

GASLIGHT AGAIN????!!!!!!

It's still available ON DEMAND from the last time they aired it!

That's what I thought as well.  If they're doing a theme-day based on killer spouses, I really wish they'd show Julie with Doris Day.  I keep seeing the original movie poster on the Warner Brothers Archives site and I want to know the answer to: "What happened to Julie on her honeymoon?" 

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I've seen the film and I dont remember! LOL. It may have been the big revelation, but I thought they were home at that point. It turns up from time to time on TCM. Very suspenseful (provided you suspend some disbelief)...

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Honestly, JULIE is more of an "air disaster" movie (a la ZERO HOUR! or THE HIGH AND THE MIGHTY)

 Goofy is it is though, it's kinda watchable. Doris Day and Louis Jourdan had more chemistry than I expected ( apparently in real life their very close friendship irritated Doris's husband, and from what I've read about Doris's husband, I say this was a good thing. )

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12 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

Honestly, JULIE is more of an "air disaster" movie (a la ZERO HOUR! or THE HIGH AND THE MIGHTY)

 Goofy is it is though, it's kinda watchable. Doris Day and Louis Jourdan had more chemistry than I expected ( apparently in real life their very close friendship irritated Doris's husband, and from what I've read about Doris's husband, I say this was a good thing. )

True! it kind of switches gears (bad pun, I know) about midway through...well, who wouldnt go for Louis Jordan??? What a dreamboat! (even if he was a nutcase!)

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In anticipation of Friday: If you haven't seen Something of Value, it has one of Sidney Poitier's very best performances, as a young man who joins the Kenyan rebels known as the Mau Mau, despite his boyhood friendship with British colonial Rock Hudson (OK, not perfect casting, though Hudson does his best). The opening scene of the shirtless stars kicking a soccer ball back and forth will probably appeal to those of a certain persuasion.

For evening, The Tall T and Ride Lonesome show just how good the combination of Budd Boetticher (director), Burt Kennedy (writer), and Randolph Scott (star) can be. If you like 1950s westerns, this is strongly recommended.

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Friday, April 13/14

MV5BOWY4YmU2ZmUtZTRhYS00NjAyLWJkN2MtZGZi

2 a.m.  Wicked, Wicked (1973).  Slasher movie filmed in Duo-vision which might be just a gimmicky way of saying split screen.

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11 minutes ago, Bogie56 said:

Friday, April 13/14

2 a.m.  Wicked, Wicked (1973).  Slasher movie filmed in Duo-vision which might be just a gimmicky way of saying split screen.

That must be in Canada only. In the US they have The Brood listed for that timeslot.

hastanede-dehset-the-brood-1979.jpg

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46 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

That must be in Canada only. In the US they have The Brood listed for that timeslot.

hastanede-dehset-the-brood-1979.jpg

I recall this was heavily censored when it came out much to Cronenberg's dismay.  I attended a screening he himself put on of the uncut version and though I am against censorship I kind of wished I and seen the censored version instead.  Too much information as they say.

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Saturday, April 14

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10 a.m.  Popeye: Wild Elephinks (1933).

hells-angels-1930-hlan-003p-s-ltd-bkp64y

9:30 p.m.  Hell’s Angels (1930).  WWI aviation film credited to Howard Hughes no less.

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23 hours ago, Bogie56 said:

Friday, April 13/14

MV5BOWY4YmU2ZmUtZTRhYS00NjAyLWJkN2MtZGZi

2 a.m.  Wicked, Wicked (1973).  Slasher movie filmed in Duo-vision which might be just a gimmicky way of saying split screen.

Tiffany Bolling gets to sing the title song during the film: "Wicked, wicked, that's the ticket ..." or something bad like that, as I recall.

 

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