Bogie56

HITS & MISSES: Yesterday, Today & Tomorrow on TCM

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3:30 AM

Synopsis: A young man carries letters between an aristocratic young woman and the groundskeeper he idolizes.
DirJoseph Losey CastJulie Christie , Alan Bates , Dominic Guard .

 

I have never seen this film, but I read the book a few months back and was highly impressed.

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On 4/15/2018 at 9:08 AM, Fedya said:

There was probably a good 2-hour version of Greed to be made, but Stroheim didn't let MGM do that.

I just hope TCM is running the theatrical release and not the four-hour monstrosity they usually show.  TCM's online schedule page and the box guides don't agree.

it's available OnDemand, and i TRIED to watch, but the version they are running is one of those that is FILLED with "restored scenes"- ie LOOOOONG shots of still photographs from lost footage (like they did with the the 1954 A STAR IS BORN, only EVEN MORE tedious)

(I know they mean well when they do this, but- personally- it adds NOTHING to my viewing experience. )

(I mean it's called a movie because the image itself should move.)

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Friday, April 20/21

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3:45 a.m.  Hercules (1983).  The battle of the breasts with Lou Ferrigno and Sybil Danning.

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Saturday, April 21

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10 a.m.  Popeye - Sock-A-Bye Baby (1934).  Open a can of spinach.   It’s Popeye on a Saturday morning!

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Saturday April 21 10 am (EST)

Tarzan Triumphs (1943)

The first and, for my money, best of the Johnny Weissmuller Tarzans once the series moved from MGM to RKO. This one has much war time propaganda, with the Germans invading the African jungle and Tarzan, initially, acting like an isolationist. There was much cheering in the theatres at the time when Tarzan, having had enough of Nazi atrocities, suddenly declared while walking towards the camera, "Now, TARZAN make war!"

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This was also one of two Tarzan films in which there was no Jane, Maureen O'Sullivan having left the series with the last of the MGMs. As a substitute for her, RKO cast beautiful Frances Gifford, fresh off her serial success as Nyoka in Jungle Girl.

Not only was Gifford lovely to behold with an innocent sexuality but she had a warm and appealing screen personality (quite frankly, far more so than Maureen O'Sullivan, for my money). As a young boy watching Tarzan Trumphs repeatedly on television I fell seriously in love with this actress.

It was only later that I learned of the tragedy of Gifford's life. She was in a car accident in 1947, with head injuries serious enough that her acting career was put on hold for a few years. Later those head injuries are said to have contributed to mental health issues, to the extent that the actress was institutionalized in mental health facilities off and on for 25 years starting in 1958. In 1983 Gifford was found working as a librarian in Pasadena, CA.. Her final years were lived in obscurity, dying of emphysema in a convalescent centre at age 73.

So here's hats off to a beautiful lady in Tarzan Triumphs, years before a road accident would change her life forever.

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25 minutes ago, TomJH said:

As a substitute for her, RKO cast beautiful Frances Gifford, fresh off her serial success as Nyoka in Jungle Girl.

Not only was Gifford lovely to behold with an innocent sexuality but she had a warm and appealing screen personality (quite frankly, far more so than Maureen O'Sullivan, for my money). As a young boy watching Tarzan Trumphs repeatedly on television I fell seriously in love with this actress.

Frances Gifford was indeed a beauty.    At first I wondered if that was a photo of Donna Reed.

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15 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Frances Gifford was indeed a beauty.    At first I wondered if that was a photo of Donna Reed.

Interestingly, as a kid I had a thing for Donna Reed on her television show, as well.

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1 hour ago, TomJH said:

Interestingly, as a kid I had a thing for Donna Reed on her television show, as well.

Tom, we would have made a right pathetic teenage couple because I had a serious thing for Donna's TV husband Carl Betz, Alex.

In recent years, watching TCM,  I found out that Donna doesn't play around when she picks Leading Men because Carl was a very serious and accomplished dramatic actor.

 

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It's surprising that Cry Danger is listed for both Saturday night and Sunday morning, but it's an enjoyable film noir with Dick Powell, Rhonda Fleming, and some location shots of LA.

For Saturday overnight or very early Sunday morning, depending on your time zone, there's the strong pre-Code Employees' Entrance, with Warren William as a lecherous department store owner and Loretta Young as one of the employees he fancies.

Sunday morning also has Till the End of Time, with the impossibly handsome Guy Madison as a returning WWII vet who falls for a war widow (Dorothy McGuire). Robert Mitchum has a great supporting role as Madison's buddy who suffers from the effects of a head injury in the war. Edward Dmytryk is the capable director.

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1 hour ago, kingrat said:

It's surprising that Cry Danger is listed for both Saturday night and Sunday morning, but it's an enjoyable film noir with Dick Powell, Rhonda Fleming, and some location shots of LA.

The Noir Alley presentations have been repeated on Saturday late night and Sunday morning since March, I believe. It was in response to complaints that perhaps Sunday mornings weren't the most opportune time for film noir showings.

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Cry Danger is worthy of a repeat. It will be interesting to hear what Eddie Muller has to say about it. This was Dick Powell's last tough guy role and he also worked as uncredited producer on the film. Powell also allowed Richard Erdman to have the best part in the film, with some of the best dialogue in a film full of good one liners.

As an illustration of Powell's lack of ego as an actor take a look at a scene in a trailer featuring Erdman and himself. Erdman, who plays a drinker, has a bit in which he pours a glass of milk for himself, plays around with a sandwich which he finally rejects, and pours the glass of milk back into its container. All the time this is happening Powell lies on a bunk in the background staring at the ceiling. He doesn't do a thing to distract or remind you "the star" of the film is there. He lets Erdman have this good little scene all to himself because Powell, the producer, knew it would be a better film for it.

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Sunday, April 22/23

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2:45 a.m.  Tampopo (1986).  I haven’t seen this one in 30 years.  It was quite a hit then.  I wasn't that blown over by it at that time but it is worth another look.

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On 4/19/2018 at 7:36 AM, LornaHansonForbes said:
3:30 AM

Synopsis: A young man carries letters between an aristocratic young woman and the groundskeeper he idolizes.
DirJoseph Losey CastJulie Christie , Alan Bates , Dominic Guard .

 

I have never seen this film, but I read the book a few months back and was highly impressed.

Thanks for the heads up. If not for your post I would have missed this one. Luckily I saw your post before going to bed the night THE GO-BETWEEN aired and set the DVR. 

I'm a big fan of Julie Christie and have never seen this movie. (I'm not a fan DR ZHIVAGO which features Julie Christie in the role for which perhaps she's most known.)   

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Tonight is Von Stroheim's good silent film version of the Merry Widow.

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I love the original operetta of this.

 

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Monday, April 23/24

William Holden night.  “If they move … kill ‘em”

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12:30 a.m.  The Wild Bunch (1969).  One of the great westerns and the entire cast is terrific.

 
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On 4/21/2018 at 6:00 PM, LornaHansonForbes said:

Alan Bates was bi, you know.

I don't care if he was tri - his hotness transcends gender.  ;)

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On 4/21/2018 at 7:30 AM, TomJH said:

Cry Danger is worthy of a repeat. It will be interesting to hear what Eddie Muller has to say about it. This was Dick Powell's last tough guy role and he also worked as uncredited producer on the film. Powell also allowed Richard Erdman to have the best part in the film, with some of the best dialogue in a film full of good one liners.

As an illustration of Powell's lack of ego as an actor take a look at a scene in a trailer featuring Erdman and himself. Erdman, who plays a drinker, has a bit in which he pours a glass of milk for himself, plays around with a sandwich which he finally rejects, and pours the glass of milk back into its container. All the time this is happening Powell lies on a bunk in the background staring at the ceiling. He doesn't do a thing to distract or remind you "the star" of the film is there. He lets Erdman have this good little scene all to himself because Powell, the producer, knew it would be a better film for it.

That was a very cool scene you mentioned in a movie full of them.  Thanks.

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I watched the last half of The Merry Widow.  Enjoyable.  From what I've read of Mae Murray she was Norma Desmond before Norma Desmond.  She was pretty and wore some great clothes but I can see how her acting style would not translate to talkies.  Roy D'Arcy was the villain, as he often played in those days.  My sweetheart John Gilbert was great, of course.  Direction by Von Stroheim.

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4 hours ago, ChristineHoard said:

I watched the last half of The Merry Widow.  Enjoyable.  From what I've read of Mae Murray she was Norma Desmond before Norma Desmond.  She was pretty and wore some great clothes but I can see how her acting style would not translate to talkies.  Roy D'Arcy was the villain, as he often played in those days.  My sweetheart John Gilbert was great, of course.  Direction by Von Stroheim.

Gilbert worked with such strong directors during the silents. Not only Von Stroheim but King Vidor (Big Parade, La Boheme, Bardelys the Magnificent), Clarence Brown (Flesh and the Devil) and Tod Browning (The Show).

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Tuesday, April 24

I.A.L. Diamond screenplays and this one is a doozy …

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8 p.m.  The Apartment (1960).  By Billy Wilder.

 
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Wednesday, April 25

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midnight.  The Proud Rebel (1958).  An Alan Ladd western that I haven’t seen.  And Olivia de Havilland co-stars.

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29 minutes ago, Bogie56 said:

Wednesday, April 25

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midnight.  The Proud Rebel (1958).  An Alan Ladd western that I haven’t seen.  And Olivia de Havilland co-stars.

Saw this one back in July of 2016 when Olivia was Star of the Month, and I really enjoyed it.  A great 'old-fashioned' western with good guys and bad guys and as the poster says a touching story as well.  Thought Olivia was really good too and she wasn't afraid to get her hands dirty as a rancher / farmer.

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1 hour ago, Bogie56 said:

Wednesday, April 25

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midnight.  The Proud Rebel (1958).  An Alan Ladd western that I haven’t seen.  And Olivia de Havilland co-stars.

The Proud Rebel was the last good film in the careers of both Alan Ladd and Michael Curtiz. A sensitive tale of a man searching for a doctor to cure his mute son, it has touching performances from Ladd, his son David (who steals the film) and Olivia de Havilland. It also boasts a fine musical score by Jerome Moross (whose score for the Big Country ranks as a classic). This film of quiet little charms is a winner.

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