Bogie56

HITS & MISSES: Yesterday, Today & Tomorrow on TCM

8,917 posts in this topic

It looks like tomorrow is Jeanette MacDonald day. I was telling my husband on the way home from work that I knew the Star of the Day tomorrow was somebody whose films I did not appreciate, but I could not remember the name.  I guess all I could recommend is "The Merry Widow", and that is partly because of Chevalier. Maybe "San Francisco" too, but it is morally a bit over the top and kooky.  (SPOILERS! I MEAN IT!) Blackee (Gable) starts believing in God because somebody he loves does not die in the earthquake??? Does this mean everybody who lost someone should become an atheist?? I've always had no appreciation for films that promote God as FedEx. 

So my recently deceased dad always told me stories about his mother dragging him to every MacDonald/Eddy film when he was a child and forcing him to listen to all of that operatic screeching. He said she thought it was exposing him to culture.

  • Thanks 1
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Merry Widow is very wittily directed by Ernst Lubitsch, and even those not especially drawn to Jeanette MacDonald or Maurice Chevalier might enjoy it for that reason. The costumes and sets are in the MGM "spare no expense" style.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, kingrat said:

The Merry Widow is very wittily directed by Ernst Lubitsch, and even those not especially drawn to Jeanette MacDonald or Maurice Chevalier might enjoy it for that reason. The costumes and sets are in the MGM "spare no expense" style.

The Merry Widow is definitely one of the best from MacDonald and Chevalier. I wish TCM would really show the French language version they filmed simultaneously called "La Veuve Joyeuse" sometime. It would make for a good Import or for during a monthly salute to MacDonald.

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, calvinnme said:

It looks like tomorrow is Jeanette MacDonald day. I was telling my husband on the way home from work that I knew the Star of the Day tomorrow was somebody whose films I did not appreciate, but I could not remember the name.  I guess all I could recommend is "The Merry Widow", and that is partly because of Chevalier. Maybe "San Francisco" too, but it is morally a bit over the top and kooky.  (SPOILERS! I MEAN IT!) Blackee (Gable) starts believing in God because somebody he loves does not die in the earthquake??? Does this mean everybody who lost someone should become an atheist?? I've always had no appreciation for films that promote God as FedEx. 

So my recently deceased dad always told me stories about his mother dragging him to every MacDonald/Eddy film when he was a child and forcing him to listen to all of that operatic screeching. He said she thought it was exposing him to culture.

LOL. I'm not into Jeannette either. I like some of her Paramount films before she switched to MGM........

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not partial to the kind of operatic material Jeannette MacDonald was famous for, but what I do like about her was her acting ability.  More often than not, it seems to me that people who were pretty good singers were fairly decent actors and actresses too.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thursday, August 9

Walter Matthau

51ML-yx6uDL.jpg

6 a.m.  Island of Love (1963).  I haven’t seen this one.  Maybe for good reason?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Bogie56 said:

Thursday, August 9

Walter Matthau

51ML-yx6uDL.jpg

6 a.m.  Island of Love (1963).  I haven’t seen this one.  Maybe for good reason?

Never saw it either. I know I avoid ENSIGN PULVER like the plague. No one could replace Jack Lemmon in the role.

Am looking forward to THE TAKING OF PELHAM ONE TWO THREE again though. I love watching Walter save the day.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Bethluvsfilms said:

Am looking forward to THE TAKING OF PELHAM ONE TWO THREE again though. I love watching Walter save the day.

ToP123 is probably a lot more visible now that it's one of the "MGM Orphans" that's been wandering around every streaming service lately with their bowl in hand, saying "Please, seh...Can I have some rotation?"  ;)  (Also, for some reason, Columbia's lately been doing that too, including, ironically, "Oliver!")

That's where I saw the glorious 70's Matthau/Robert Shaw version (we're pretty much down to Vudu Movies on Us showing the same two dozen MGM/UA/Cannon pictures over and over, so get used to Teen Wolf and Legally Blonde), and yes, Matthau is a darling even in a 70's NY-action role.

One critic at the time pointed out that the story was rooted in NYC's 70's malaise, and "haunted by Abe Beame"--no prize for guessing who the hated sick-in-bed mayor is supposed to be--and as an "honorary" NY'er who barely remembers how bad things were in the 70's, I have to take my sentimentality from whatever gritty 70's Golden Age movies I can get it from.

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Friday, August 10

Dorothy Malone.  I’ll be recording a bunch of these.

MV5BNWM2NmJhMTctODhhMy00Njg3LThiYTQtMjg1

7:15 a.m.  Sincerely Yours (1955) with hunky leading man,  Liberace!

76059025.png

2:30 p.m.  Convicted (1950).  with Glenn Ford and Broderick Crawford.

dorothy-malone-randolph-scott-tall-man-r

4:30 p.m.  Tall Man Riding (1955).  with Randolph Scott

Tip-on-a-Dead-Jockey-1957-1.jpg

4 a.m.  Tip on a Dead Jockey (1957).  with Robert Taylor

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

tonight at 8:00 pm (Eastern) for DOROTHY MALONE day, THE TARNISHED ANGELS (1958**) which reunited her with WRITTEN ON THE WIND director DOUGLAS SIRK (that film is on at 10:00). It is a rare BLACK AND WHITE picture for Sirk (although, as I recall the print has a decidedly blueish hue to it that i found interesting)- it's a visually involving film with a surprisingly excellent performance from ROCK HUDSON, who nails a scene in a newsroom near the end.

ALSO WITH ROBERT STACK AT MAXIMUM HOTNESS and JACK CARSON, who as always, is sensational.

not just for Sirk completists, it is a film that I liked better the second time I saw it.

Would make an interesting companion film to Nic Ray's THE LUSTY MEN.

tarnished.jpg

 

**- some sources list the film as 1957.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I didnt really care for Tarnished Angels, but Written on the Wind is a guilty pleasure I'll watch again. :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Saturday, August 11

Gary Cooper

star_night_at_the_cocoanut_grove_s-90215

8:30 a.m.  Star Night at the Cocoanut Grove (1934).

fiesta.jpg

9 a.m.  La Fiesta de Santa Barbara (1935).  featuring Harpo Marx!

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 minutes ago, Bogie56 said:

Saturday, August 11

Gary Cooper

star_night_at_the_cocoanut_grove_s-90215

8:30 a.m.  Star Night at the Cocoanut Grove (1934).

fiesta.jpg

9 a.m.  La Fiesta de Santa Barbara (1935).  featuring Harpo Marx!

Harpo in color! What a joy to see. There are some celebrities that I only have mental visions of in black and white, like him and W.C. Fields so this was wonderful to see. Am I losing it or does Harpo look a bit like Alan Arkin in this photo? Thanks, Bogie.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, CaveGirl said:

Harpo in color! What a joy to see. There are some celebrities that I only have mental visions of in black and white, like him and W.C. Fields so this was wonderful to see. Am I losing it or does Harpo look a bit like Alan Arkin in this photo? Thanks, Bogie.

1935 Technicolor according to the imdb.  

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Hibi said:

I didnt really care for Tarnished Angels, but Written on the Wind is a guilty pleasure I'll watch again. :D

TARNISHED did not make a huge impression on me the first time either, although I wouldn't say I didn't care for it. I rewatched it not too long ago and really liked it a whole lot better the second time.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

tonight at 8:00 pm (Eastern) for DOROTHY MALONE day, THE TARNISHED ANGELS (1958**) which reunited her with WRITTEN ON THE WIND director DOUGLAS SIRK (that film is on at 10:00). It is a rare BLACK AND WHITE picture for Sirk (although, as I recall the print has a decidedly blueish hue to it that i found interesting)- it's a visually involving film with a surprisingly excellent performance from ROCK HUDSON, who nails a scene in a newsroom near the end.

ALSO WITH ROBERT STACK AT MAXIMUM HOTNESS and JACK CARSON, who as always, is sensational.

not just for Sirk completists, it is a film that I liked better the second time I saw it.

Would make an interesting companion film to Nic Ray's THE LUSTY MEN.

tarnished.jpg

 

**- some sources list the film as 1957.

It opened in late December 1957 in some cities.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Bogie56 said:

Saturday, August 11

fiesta.jpg

9 a.m.  La Fiesta de Santa Barbara (1935).  featuring Harpo Marx!

I'm sorry, but Harpo Marx in Technicolor and wearing normal clothes is simply Martin Short.  :(

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Count me in as a big fan of The Tarnished Angels. Great cinematography and direction, strong performances by the four stars, including Robert Stack. Stack is sometimes very good (Great Day in the Morning, for instance) and sometimes wooden (House of Bamboo, no pun intended).

Some critics believe that Written in the Wind says something serious about America, but most movie fans have more sense and just enjoy the juicy melodrama, especially Dorothy Malone's killer mambo.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
52 minutes ago, kingrat said:

Count me in as a big fan of The Tarnished Angels. Great cinematography and direction, strong performances by the four stars, including Robert Stack. Stack is sometimes very good (Great Day in the Morning, for instance) and sometimes wooden (House of Bamboo, no pun intended)

Actually bamboo is a grass, in fact it is the fastest growing grass in the world- sometimes growing as much as 18 inches a day.

i'm sorry, I know lots and lots of things, but 97% of them are completely useless.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, kingrat said:

 

Some critics believe that Written in the Wind says something serious about America, but most movie fans have more sense and just enjoy the juicy melodrama, especially Dorothy Malone's killer mambo.

Yowsa!

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

 

i'm sorry, I know lots and lots of things, but 97% of them are completely useless.

That makes you highly qualified to post on these boards.

  • Thanks 1
  • Haha 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They also used the same mambo music from WRITTEN ON THE WIND in 1960's THE LEECH WOMAN.

im sorry, did I say 97% of the things I know are useless? I meant 98%...

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

They also used the same mambo music from WRITTEN ON THE WIND in 1960's THE LEECH WOMAN.

im sorry, did I say 97% of the things I know are useless? I meant 98%...

Well now I just had to check by watching both scenes and you are correct. Both films use this riff on "Temptation."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sunday, August 12

Doris Day

Annex-Day-Doris_08.jpg?w=1080

11:45 a.m.  Carson on TCM: Doris Day (1/16/76).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

They also used the same mambo music from WRITTEN ON THE WIND in 1960's THE LEECH WOMAN.

im sorry, did I say 97% of the things I know are useless? I meant 98%...

"Useless"?

Bite your tongue, Lorna! That is exactly the kind of information that I value. To live a happy life, one should often place what some see as the trivial into a serious context to be examined and put the serious things into the trivial file. It's what kept Steve and Eydie married happily for so many years, since Eydie said they never argued because they never talked about anything serious.

I love TLW and WOTW, yet never noticed they used the "same mambo music" in both. This is greater to know than deciphering the DaVinci Code possibly.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

New Members:

Register Here

Learn more about the new message boards:

FAQ

Having problems?

Contact Us