Bogie56

HITS & MISSES: Yesterday, Today & Tomorrow on TCM

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As many movies as I've watched, and I've only seen two out of the twelve being shown on Stewart Granger day: King Solomon's Mines and Moonfleet. But I don't have any burning desire to see the other ones anytime soon, either.

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Monday, August 20

Stewart Granger Day, and there are two films that I would recommend:

THE LAST HUNT (1956) 12PM (EST)

I would recommend this western primarily for Robert Taylor, cast against type as a cold blooded gunslinger/buffalo hunter with racist attitudes towards Indians. This may well be Taylor's finest hour. He may have been a stolid, wooden screen presence in many of his films but in this one he is chillingly effective.

rt781.jpg

SCARAMOUCHE (1952) 12 AM (TUESDAY MORNING)

The highlight of Granger's career, and one of the best swashbucklers of all time. Eleanor Parker is feisty as a tempestuous love interest, Janet Leigh is very lovely as a lady who loves Granger, and Mel Ferrer is highly effective as a cold blooded aristocrat and the greatest swordsman in France who loves to duel and put commoners and anyone else in their place.

Granger is extraordinarily impressive with a sword in this film (there was little, if any, doubling of the actor) and his final 7 1/2 minute duel with Ferrer remains a classic.

scaramouche.jpg?resize=320,235

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1 hour ago, LawrenceA said:

As many movies as I've watched, and I've only seen two out of the twelve being shown on Stewart Granger day: King Solomon's Mines and Moonfleet. But I don't have any burning desire to see the other ones anytime soon, either.

Do yourself a favourite, Lawrence, and see The Last Hunt and, especially, Scaramouche.

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Tuesday, August 21/22

Anita Louise.  I threw a dart and hit this one …

994131cc39d21d1a7ecd33dee84a56cf.jpg

5 a.m.  Personal Maid’s Secret (1935).  with Margaret Lindsay.

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this offering on ANITA LOUISE DAY looks more interesting...although it might also be terrible (I'm iffy on Rogers, but John Ford directed...I've been interested in THE SUN SHINES BRIGHT (his own remake of the film)

10:45 PM
B/W - 80 m
 
Judge Priest (1934)

Synopsis: A Southern judge confounds civic leaders with his laid-back approach to his job.
DirJohn Ford CastWill Rogers , Tom Brown , Anita Louise .


LEONARD MALTIN REVIEW:    
? John Ford. Will Rogers, Tom Brown, Anita Louise, Henry B. Walthall, Stepin Fetchit, Hattie McDaniel. Exceptional slice of Americana with Rogers as commonsensical yet controversial judge in small town; full of warm and funny character vignettes, including Walthall's stirring courtroom scene. Ford remade it in 1953 as THE SUN SHINES BRIGHT.
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EDIT:  i have no idea why MALTIN'S REVIEW of three and a half stars is translated into Mr. Unhappy Face by the messageboard system. clearly he gave the film a good review.

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I've seen Judge Priest a few times, and while I like it, it is definitely a movie of its time, and will offend many due to the antics of Stepin Fetchit. Even if that doesn't bother you, others find the movie corny, boring and completely unfunny. I've read more than one comment on these boards blasting it. 

P.S.: Leonard Maltin? No.

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On 8/17/2018 at 11:13 AM, kingrat said:

Up the Sandbox was a best-selling novel. The title is, of course, a variation on "up your [whatever]." The woman is rebelling against traditional roles for women, like mom of kid playing in sandbox. Among other things, the woman fantasizes about having a lover who's involved in revolutionary politics. The novel came out at pretty much the time that Tom Wolfe coined the phrase "radical chic."

I haven't read the book or seen the movie. Dark Shadows fans might be interested that David Selby (who can forget him as Quentin Collins?) plays Streisand's husband. The movie was not a hit.

I watched it over the wknd after recording it. i can see why it didnt go over. Some of the fantasy sequences are funny. Others are just strange and disconnected to the narrative. (the Castro sequence and the Statue of Liberty). Makes for a very confusing movie. Streisand does a good job though as does Selby in a small role..........

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Well, I guess I'll open myself up for criticism here, but I've enjoyed Stewart Granger's SUTS day.  As a kid, his movies would occasionally show up on a Saturday or Sunday afternoon on the local independent station or late-night television, but I was never interested in them.

TCM affords us the opportunities to re-visit movies and performers we absolutely love as well as those we might not be too familiar with.  It also gives one the chance to take a second look at the leads in a movie, the supporting players, or the movie itself.

Granger was a pretty versatile actor.  He could be stylish, suave, or stern.  He could be a rogue and borderline villain, as well as the macho man plenty of boys aspired to be.  His double death scene with Keenan Wynn near the end of "All The Brothers Were Valiant" was a piece of crazy-good movie editing.  So far, my favorite pictures have been "Captain Boycott", "The Last Hunt", "All The Brothers Were Valiant", "The Wild North", and "Bhowani Junction", which I'm currently watching.  I've always liked "King Solomon's Mines", but oddly enough, "Scaramouche" just never hit my hot button. 

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21 minutes ago, midwestan said:

Well, I guess I'll open myself up for criticism here, but I've enjoyed Stewart Granger's SUTS day.  As a kid, his movies would occasionally show up on a Saturday or Sunday afternoon on the local independent station or late-night television, but I was never interested in them.

TCM affords us the opportunities to re-visit movies and performers we absolutely love as well as those we might not be too familiar with.  It also gives one the chance to take a second look at the leads in a movie, the supporting players, or the movie itself.

Granger was a pretty versatile actor.  He could be stylish, suave, or stern.  He could be a rogue and borderline villain, as well as the macho man plenty of boys aspired to be.  His double death scene with Keenan Wynn near the end of "All The Brothers Were Valiant" was a piece of crazy-good movie editing.  So far, my favorite pictures have been "Captain Boycott", "The Last Hunt", "All The Brothers Were Valiant", "The Wild North", and "Bhowani Junction", which I'm currently watching.  I've always liked "King Solomon's Mines", but oddly enough, "Scaramouche" just never hit my hot button. 

I think it's pretty safe to say that Scaramouche is probably the most highly regarded film of Granger's career. I think it's his one bona fide classic. Certainly no other swashbuckler in the '50s comes close to it in style or exuberance. And Granger's flair in the lead role, his handsome presence (he worth costume clothing beautifully) and obviously extensive training with a sword adds immeasurably to the film's enjoyment.

The movies have had only a very small handful of actors who can excel with both the athleticism as well as light hearted charm required of a great swashbuckler. I think that in Scaramouche Stewart Granger stands among that very select company.

ed77a87afe1a6bcbde97e5ea85bc3ca2.jpg

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I agree with you Tom about Stewart Granger's athleticism.  He performed most of his own stunts and was regarded on par with Basil Rathbone as an expert swordsman.  Like a lot of leading men of the classic era, he looked great in just about anything he wore, irrespective of the film genre he was in.

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For Anita Louise day, I recommend both of the films with Errol Flynn:

The Sisters.  This film features Flynn as a ne'er do well sports reporter who meets Bette Davis at a Presidential Election celebration in 1904 in Silver Bow, Montana.  Flynn and Davis have a whirlwind courtship and marry.  Davis quickly discovers that Flynn, while charming, is not the most responsible and the couple struggle financially.  Anita Louise plays one of Davis' sisters who marries Alan Hale, a much older man.  Louise, it seems is a bit of a golddigger. 

Green Light.  In this film, Flynn plays a brilliant young surgeon who ends up sacrificing his career on behalf of his older, esteemed colleague.  Louise plays a young woman whom Flynn falls in love with.  One of the conflicts of the story however, is that Louise is the daughter of the woman who died on the operating table under the watch of Flynn's older colleague.  Louise doesn't know that Flynn is the doctor who has claimed responsibility for her mother's death. 

I am recording:

That Certain Woman- A Bette Davis movie that I haven't seen

The Go-Getter- Only because I liked the synopsis: "A Navy veteran with one leg fights to make himself a success."

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19 minutes ago, midwestan said:

I agree with you Tom about Stewart Granger's athleticism.  He performed most of his own stunts and was regarded on par with Basil Rathbone as an expert swordsman.  Like a lot of leading men of the classic era, he looked great in just about anything he wore, irrespective of the film genre he was in.

I always liked Stewart Granger finding him charming,  athletic,  with a appealing screen persona (even when playing a less then honest character.     I enjoy Scaramouche and find it to be a solid adventure type film.   One reason is Eleanor Parker;    This is the film that made me notice how beautiful she was.     Often she played an ice princess and that reduced her sexual appeal but in this film she has spunk and along with the wonderful color photography,  she looks stunning.

 

 

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12 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

I've seen Judge Priest a few times, and while I like it, it is definitely a movie of its time, and will offend many due to the antics of Stepin Fetchit. Even if that doesn't bother you, others find the movie corny, boring and completely unfunny. I've read more than one comment on these boards blasting it. 

P.S.: Leonard Maltin? No.

It used to be in the 1001 Movies list too before getting deleted out.

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I may check out "Going Places" tomorrow. I've never heard of it before but I like some of those 30s musicals so I may like it.

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20 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

I've seen Judge Priest a few times, and while I like it, it is definitely a movie of its time, and will offend many due to the antics of Stepin Fetchit. Even if that doesn't bother you, others find the movie corny, boring and completely unfunny. I've read more than one comment on these boards blasting it. 

P.S.: Leonard Maltin? No.

YOU're doing the Lord's work, here Lawrence. I think it might be best if I skipped this one.

After THE NAKED JUNGLE, MANDINGO, that awful thing with Mickey Dolenz that we saw a while back- what was it called?- and KONGO, sitting through this might just makes me go all "Jebediah Springfield" on either or both of the Confederate Monuments that sit within 5000 feet of where I sit writing this.

(and i carry a hacksaw at all times)

I understand that JOHN FORD's career output contains (probably) more outright masterpieces than any director, but I get the sense that if I knew him in real life, I'd think he was a first class Rat Bastard.

WILL ROGERS is like WALTER BRENNAN or BARRY FITZGERALD: sorry not sorry, but I can't help it: like a Labrador Retriever that loves nearly everyone but growls like the Devil at your brother's one weird friend for some primal reason: I don't like him, I don't trust him and I wouldn't leave him alone in my house for a minute.

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Wednesday, August 22

Dana Andrews

scpdvd_010.jpg

8 p.m.  The Ox-Bow Incident (1943).  This is currently my favourite film of 1943 and features an intense performance by Andrews.

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7 minutes ago, Bogie56 said:

Wednesday, August 22

Dana Andrews

scpdvd_010.jpg

8 p.m.  The Ox-Bow Incident (1943).  This is currently my favourite film of 1943 and features an intense performance by Andrews.

Dana Andrews is quite terrific in this film. The following year the success of Laura would type cast him as a taciturn, stoic leading man (at which he would excel for much of his career).

It's interesting, though, to see the largely unexplored versatility that Andrews possessed as an actor with the sensitivity of his performance in this film (as well as Swamp Water two years before).

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Like midwestan, I usually enjoy Stewart Granger. I saw most of The Prisoner of Zenda last night and enjoyed it all over again. The B&W Zenda with Ronald Colman is also fine, but Granger and Deborah Kerr are a good match, and I love every syllable and sneer of James Mason's villain. Jane Greer and Louis Calhern aren't too shabby, either.

I also agree with jamesjazzguitar about Eleanor Parker in Scaramouche. She's really beautiful, sexy, and spirited.

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It's difficult to limit the picks for Dana Andrews' day. If you haven't seen classics like The Best Years of Our Lives and The Ox-Bow Incident, that's probably a good place to start, but Night Song is a surprisingly strong romantic drama, with Andrews superb as a self-loathing pianist who has lost his sight; both Preminger noirs, Where the Sidewalk Ends and Fallen Angel, are good, especially the latter; and A Walk in the Sun is one of the top WWII films, with some poetic use of language and none the worse for that. Brainstorm has its fans, too, though alcoholism has taken its toll on Andrews. While the City Sleeps and Beyond a Reasonable Doubt look like TV rather than cinema, but they are at least fair, if far from Fritz Lang's best work.

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On 8/19/2018 at 1:56 PM, TomJH said:

Monday, August 20

Stewart Granger Day, and there are two films that I would recommend:

THE LAST HUNT (1956) 12PM (EST)

I would recommend this western primarily for Robert Taylor, cast against type as a cold blooded gunslinger/buffalo hunter with racist attitudes towards Indians. This may well be Taylor's finest hour. He may have been a stolid, wooden screen presence in many of his films but in this one he is chillingly effective.

rt781.jpg

 

Thanks for the tip TomJH. This was a very good western. And in that last scene, I've never seen Robert Taylor look more natural. :)

 

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1 minute ago, calvinnme said:

Thanks for the tip TomJH. This was a very good western. And in that last scene, I've never seen Robert Taylor look more natural. :)

 

Be fair now. Taylor is very good in this western.

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Wednesday, August 22 Dana Andrews Day

Where The Sidewalk Ends (1950) 9:30 pm

Dana Andrews's years in first class productions came to an end after this hard boiled reunion for the actor with both Gene Tierney (in a relatively small role, really) and director Otto Preminger. Andrews gives a strong performance as a cop known for his brutal treatment of suspects and how he becomes involved in a coverup. This street crime drama is quite effective. I have always felt, though, that the film's ending is a disappointment, and the film would have been more tragically memorable if there had been (SPOILER ALERT) an act of self sacrifice as a form of redemption.

For fans of Andrews fans, this lesser known effort is definitely worth a view.

Where+the+Sidewalk+Ends_Mark+Dixon+can%2

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47 minutes ago, kingrat said:

It's difficult to limit the picks for Dana Andrews' day. If you haven't seen classics like The Best Years of Our Lives and The Ox-Bow Incident, that's probably a good place to start, but Night Song is a surprisingly strong romantic drama, with Andrews superb as a self-loathing pianist who has lost his sight; both Preminger noirs, Where the Sidewalk Ends and Fallen Angel, are good, especially the latter; and A Walk in the Sun is one of the top WWII films, with some poetic use of language and none the worse for that. Brainstorm has its fans, too, though alcoholism has taken its toll on Andrews. While the City Sleeps and Beyond a Reasonable Doubt look like TV rather than cinema, but they are at least fair, if far from Fritz Lang's best work.

Oh Yay, a DANA ANDREWS day! He is exceptional in THE OX BOW INCIDENT which is one of my favorite films from one of (if not my outright) favorite years, 1943.

One of these days maybe they'll get around to showing DAISY KENYON, which is in all honesty, maybe his best performance ever and you don't expect it to be. Nonetheless, he is excellent in every single scene.

WHILE THE CITY SLEEPS seems to be set in a Metropolis where the population is about 12 people, tops, and they all keep running into and passing one another with the precision of a Restoration Farce. I love Fritz Lang but it's some lazy filmmaking.

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