Bogie56

HITS & MISSES: Yesterday, Today & Tomorrow on TCM

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17 minutes ago, scsu1975 said:

Wow, that guy on the right looks just like Tom.

I don't see the resemblance at all.

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Sunday, December 30

Double Bogie

BogartAstorLorre.jpg

8 p.m.  The Maltese Falcon (1941).

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10 p.m.  Casablanca (1942).

 
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Monday, December 31

The Thin Man series and there goes 2018.

images?q=tbn:ANd9GcS1WKdsF7CzR8WPMWs2vye

12:30 p.m.  Another Thin Man (1939).  In an extraordinary year for films.

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Also coming on tonight 12/30 at 2 AM are two very good Ingmar Bergman films-

Winter Light

b33uXy9vWW5wgQxMaiODJANyef5h6J_large.jpg

and the Silence. (Been a while since I've seen this one).

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12 hours ago, Bogie56 said:

Monday, December 31

The Thin Man series and there goes 2018.

images?q=tbn:ANd9GcS1WKdsF7CzR8WPMWs2vye

12:30 p.m.  Another Thin Man (1939).  In an extraordinary year for films.

I like all of the Thin Man films, and I'll binge watch them anytime TCM has a marathon, but I didn't like the fact that a kid was shoehorned into the act. And it probably happened just because it was the production code era and every couple ABSOLUTELY MUST have at least one kid or it's just unnatural! I think I'll always like precode Nick and Nora best in the original Thin Man with both of them partying just a little too much. Or am I completely over-thinking and overreacting to this situation?

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10 hours ago, Gershwin fan said:

Also coming on tonight 12/30 at 2 AM are two very good Ingmar Bergman films-

Winter Light

b33uXy9vWW5wgQxMaiODJANyef5h6J_large.jpg

and the Silence. (Been a while since I've seen this one).

the-silence-1200-1200-675-675-crop-00000

Many viewers like Winter Light better than I do, but the scene with Max van Sydow is so great that I was surprised to discover how little screen time MvS actually had. Sven Nykvist's cinematography is, as usual, outstanding.

The Silence, which has a lesser reputation, appeals to me more. The boy in a strange country wandering the hotel corridors seeing strange people--big influence on The Shining? Also the hotel in Barton Fink?

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26 minutes ago, calvinnme said:

I like all of the Thin Man films, and I'll binge watch them anytime TCM has a marathon, but I didn't like the fact that a kid was shoehorned into the act. And it probably happened just because it was the production code era and every couple ABSOLUTELY MUST have at least one kid or it's just unnatural! I think I'll always like precode Nick and Nora best in the original Thin Man with both of them partying just a little too much. Or am I completely over-thinking and overreacting to this situation?

I don't think there was a requirement to have a kid, just that the producers and/or writers thought it would be nice.  My favorite is The Thin Man Goes Home.  Probably because it takes place in a different location and is somewhat "lighter" than the others.  However, they are all good.  The first one is my wife's favorite.

If still available, the DVD set that TCM (or somebody) put out many years ago is the best way to have it all.  You get the movies with cartoons, shorts, etc. AND the TCM documentaries on William Powell and Myrna Loy.  The doc. on Powell and Loy also has an episode from The Thin Man TV series with Peter Lawford and Phyllis Kirk.

One interesting short is Love On Tap featuring the Merriel Abbott dancers, who traveled the country and apparently was a fairly extensive operation.  Also appeared in several movies.  I never knew such things existed.

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1 hour ago, calvinnme said:

I like all of the Thin Man films, and I'll binge watch them anytime TCM has a marathon, but I didn't like the fact that a kid was shoehorned into the act. And it probably happened just because it was the production code era and every couple ABSOLUTELY MUST have at least one kid or it's just unnatural! I think I'll always like precode Nick and Nora best in the original Thin Man with both of them partying just a little too much. Or am I completely over-thinking and overreacting to this situation?

I wasn't a fan of the baby either.  I think the third film, Another Thin Man, is the weakest of the six.  The baby party is irritating.  My favorite is the first one, The Thin Man, with the last one, Song of the Thin Man coming in a close second. 

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2 hours ago, calvinnme said:

I like all of the Thin Man films, and I'll binge watch them anytime TCM has a marathon, but I didn't like the fact that a kid was shoehorned into the act. And it probably happened just because it was the production code era and every couple ABSOLUTELY MUST have at least one kid or it's just unnatural! I think I'll always like precode Nick and Nora best in the original Thin Man with both of them partying just a little too much. Or am I completely over-thinking and overreacting to this situation?

I don't believe you're over-thinking it.  Kids in motion pictures are a hit-and-miss proposition.  They can be adorable, endearing, and wise beyond their years, OR they can be absolutely annoying.  Of the 6 'Thin Man' films, a kid is featured in half of them (an infant in "Another Thin Man", a pre-schooler in "Shadow of the Thin Man", and a pre-adolescent in "Song of the Thin Man").  As far as their appearances in these pictures go, I don't think they take anything away from the main story line.  Little Nicky is referred to, but not seen in "The Thin Man Goes Home".

 

1 hour ago, speedracer5 said:

I wasn't a fan of the baby either.  I think the third film, Another Thin Man, is the weakest of the six.  The baby party is irritating.  My favorite is the first one, The Thin Man, with the last one, Song of the Thin Man coming in a close second. 

Yeah, the baby party scene was pretty lame, but audiences in the late '30's probably thought it was funny.

As an aside, having watched all the 'Thin Man' pictures numerous times, it struck me that of all the performers who got a film credit, only Edward Brophy and Leon Ames played different characters in two different pictures (Brophy in 'The Thin Man' and 'The Thin Man Goes Home'; Ames in 'The Thin Man Goes Home' and 'Song of the Thin Man').

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2 hours ago, TheCid said:

I don't think there was a requirement to have a kid, just that the producers and/or writers thought it would be nice.  My favorite is The Thin Man Goes Home.  Probably because it takes place in a different location and is somewhat "lighter" than the others.  However, they are all good.  The first one is my wife's favorite.

If still available, the DVD set that TCM (or somebody) put out many years ago is the best way to have it all.  You get the movies with cartoons, shorts, etc. AND the TCM documentaries on William Powell and Myrna Loy.  The doc. on Powell and Loy also has an episode from The Thin Man TV series with Peter Lawford and Phyllis Kirk. 

One interesting short is Love On Tap featuring the Merriel Abbott dancers, who traveled the country and apparently was a fairly extensive operation.  Also appeared in several movies.  I never knew such things existed. 

I love that DVD set. It is probably out of print now, and I got it years ago. I think it sold so many copies that it convinced WB that box sets of their classic films would sell. They had the added plus of having George Feltenstein, a real lover of classic film, in charge of the release of all of those box sets. From 2003-2008 we were truly living in a golden age.

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Tuesday, January 1

Happy New Year everyone!

Carole Landis 100th birthday salute.

m0onemillionbc.jpg

11:15 p.m.  One Million B.C. (1940)  With caveman, Victor Mature.

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11 hours ago, kingrat said:

Many viewers like Winter Light better than I do, but the scene with Max van Sydow is so great that I was surprised to discover how little screen time MvS actually had. Sven Nykvist's cinematography is, as usual, outstanding.

The Silence, which has a lesser reputation, appeals to me more. The boy in a strange country wandering the hotel corridors seeing strange people--big influence on The Shining? Also the hotel in Barton Fink?

Winter Light is one of my favorite Bergman films. I like that the ending can be interpreted as either pro-atheism or pro-religion depending on how you look at it.

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On 12/29/2018 at 3:33 AM, Bogie56 said:

Sunday, December 30

Double Bogie

BogartAstorLorre.jpg

8 p.m.  The Maltese Falcon (1941).

Picture-9.png

10 p.m.  Casablanca (1942).

 

It must’ve been in honor of his birthday.

I was listening to the Sirius classic radio channel yesterday and they had a marathon of Bogart performances on radio, the announcer was saying that for years the story that Bogart was born on December 25 Was dismissed as studio publicity and it was speculated that he was actually born in late January

...until a few years ago when someone came across a copy of the paper from his hometown and it lists, to a doctor AND Mrs. Stephen Bogart, the birth of a boy on December 25.

So be sure to take the time in late December every year to appreciate the birth of our Lord and Savior, Humphrey Bogart.

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7 hours ago, Bogie56 said:

Tuesday, January 1

Happy New Year everyone!

Carole Landis 100th birthday salute.

m0onemillionbc.jpg

11:15 p.m.  One Million B.C. (1940)  With caveman, Victor Mature.

I have watched this and will have to watch it again.  Somehow it just doesn't seem to be a Carole Landis role.

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7 hours ago, Bogie56 said:

Tuesday, January 1

Happy New Year everyone!

Carole Landis 100th birthday salute.

 

11:15 p.m.  One Million B.C. (1940)  With caveman, Victor Mature.

I am most interested in the film Turnabout.  It was mentioned on an episode of the podcast, "You Must Remember This," about Landis.  Her episode was part of the "Tragic Blondes" series.

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32 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

I am most interested in the film Turnabout It was mentioned on an episode of the podcast, "You Must Remember This," about Landis.  Her episode was part of the "Tragic Blondes" series.

I highly recommend this film.

It is BANANAS.

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8 hours ago, Bogie56 said:

 

m0onemillionbc.jpg

11:15 p.m.  One Million B.C. (1940)  With caveman, Victor Mature.

Seeing this picture again reminds me of some of my "historical" questions.

1.  How did they keep their hair from becoming greasy and unkempt?  2.  How did the guys shave?  3. How did the women shave their legs and why did they?

Yes, I know it is Hollywood.  The one about shaved legs goes into the 20th century. Apparently it was not a practice until about 1915.  So all those Westerns with women swimming, bathing, etc. with shaved legs?  Maybe the dance hall girls did, but others?

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2 hours ago, TheCid said:

Seeing this picture again reminds me of some of my "historical" questions.

1.  How did they keep their hair from becoming greasy and unkempt?  2.  How did the guys shave?  3. How did the women shave their legs and why did they?

 

I always wondered who had bigger breasts; Carole Landis or Victor Mature?

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Wednesday, January 2

“I could have been a somebody.”

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8 p.m.  On the Waterfront (1954).  Fantastic film!

 
 
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1/1/19- at 9:30 (Eastern) - TURNABOUT (1940)-

turnabout1.jpg?w=640

Is this the first English language body-switch movie?

Anyway, I would include it on my TOP TEN list of films from the GOLDEN ERA that I think a modern audience would appreciate.

It is a HIGHLY UNUSUAL movie and one well-ahead of its time.

(watching it for the first time, my reaction to the film was just like the one on the gal in the lower left hand corner of the above image...only i wouldn't be caught dead in that outfit.)

ps- yes, that is MARY ASTOR in the turban.

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This isn't really one film I enjoyed yesterday, but I have to say it was quite a hoot seeing Eddie Muller discuss something outside of his area of expertise of crime, noir, and mystery and doing a pretty good job of it on New Year's Eve. I've always figured Eddie discussing "Seven Brides for Seven Brothers" going something like this:

Six men from the sticks encounter trouble when they get out of their element and entangled with six dames from town, brawling with their boyfriends and kidnapping the dames.  The deepening snow is just a metaphor for how the brothers feel the walls closing in on them, as spring will surely bring justice from the town and the women whose families they have wronged. Meanwhile the oldest brother retreats into solitude, and woe to the man that breaks that solitude. Will they all have an encounter with the noose come spring? Watch and find out.

Instead Eddie seemed to get into the spirit of things, "fancy footwork" and all.

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After reading the reviews and watching a couple of clips, undecided about Turnabout.  But, I will probably record it anyway and watch it tomorrow.  Already recording One Million BC and Having a Wonderful Crime anyway, so why not.

Having a Wonderful Crime is really quite entertaining.

Every time I think about Landis, I dislike Rex Harrison a little more.  Never really have cared for him much anyway.

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Cid, Rex Harrison got a punishment of his own: he married Rachel Roberts, an actress whose work I love, but the lady had serious mental problems. If I remember correctly, someone who knew both couples thought that Harrison suffered even more from Roberts than Richard Burton did from Elizabeth Taylor. I believe some of this is in the Mark Harris book on the five Best Picture nominees for 1967, which included Doctor Dolittle.

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Recommendation for Wednesday evening: Viva Zapata! is one of my favorite Kazan films. Excellent script by John Steinbeck, excellent cinematography by Joe MacDonald. In a supporting role Joseph Wiseman gives one of the most chilling performances ever of a fanatic idealist who cares nothing for individual human beings. 

Though The Sea of Grass was more or less disowned by Kazan, and Scorsese did not include it in the big box of Kazan films he curated, I think it's worth seeing. Tracy and Hepburn are not at their best, although Hepburn does well in her two big scenes later in the film, but the script is first-rate, and there are strong supporting performances by Melvyn Douglas, Ruth Nelson, Edgar Buchanan, and Robert Walker.

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