Bogie56

HITS & MISSES: Yesterday, Today & Tomorrow on TCM

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Thursday, January 3

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6. a.m.  The Patsy (1928).  No Jerry and it’s not the Lee Harvey Oswald story either.  This one features Marion Davies and Marie Dressler.

 
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Friday, January 4/5

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4 a.m.  Stranger Than Paradise (1984).  It seems that Frogs (1972) has been bumped for this Jarmusch film.

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1 hour ago, Bogie56 said:

Friday, January 4/5

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4 a.m.  Stranger Than Paradise (1984).  It seems that Frogs (1972) has been bumped for this Jarmusch film.

I remember seeing this film when it premiered at The New York Film Festival in 1984. It was quite the rage for a while, seeming so hip, but I was never particularly keen on it; and the style became wearying after a while. Jarmusch's later film, Down by Law, opened the NYFF in 1986. In 1986, the hit of the NYFF was, for me, A Zed and Two Noughts, a crazy film by Peter Greenaway. 

The Jarmusch films might work well on television, though. 

 

 

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On 1/2/2019 at 1:28 AM, kingrat said:

 

Though The Sea of Grass  was more or less disowned by Kazan, and Scorsese did not include it in the big box of Kazan films he curated, I think it's worth seeing. Tracy and Hepburn are not at their best, although Hepburn does well in her two big scenes later in the film, but the script is first-rate, and there are strong supporting performances by Melvyn Douglas, Ruth Nelson, Edgar Buchanan, and Robert Walker.

how interesting that this film aired (is airing?) so hot on the heels of KEEPER OF THE FLAME (1943)- which along with WITHOUT LOVE (1945) make up the forgotten troika of HEPBURN/TRACY pairings...and to be honest, I think KEEPER and THE SEA OF GRASS are a lot more interesting (and better) than ADAM'S RIB, WOMAN OF THE YEAR, GUESS WHO'S... and STATE OF THE UNION (tbh, I'm not a HUGE fan of any of the latter four, but I adore PAT AND MIKE and DESK SET. )

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THE SEA OF GRASS (1947) is the most complicated relationship TRACY and HEPBURN ever enacted on screen, and it's a complicated movie, made moreso by the strong, aggressive performance by MELVYN DOUGLAS (imagine if DAVID WAYNE's character in ADAM'S RIB were masculine and likeable.)

ALSO, like KEEPER OF THE FLAME, the film is 100% (or close to it) STUDIO SOUNSTAGE SHOT, all the exteriors are rear projections (TRACY probably didn't do location shooting at this stage in the career) and KAZAN hated it for that reason and, like KEEPER OF THE FLAME's obvious interior exteriors, I find the rear projections to be kind of charming and well-filmed and would cite the film as a great example of black and white cinematography.

the "give him a kiss, for me, Sarah Jane" scene ranks among HEPBURN'S finest on screen moments, along with the crying at the window in ALICE ADAMS and the "Haul it ovah toots, haul it ovah" scene in BRINGING UP BABY.

 

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Lorna, I so agree about how well Hepburn plays that scene. Also agree about how lovely she looks in Keeper of the Flame, and how Keeper and Sea of Grass are actually among the better Tracy/Hepburn films.

The grass in Sea of Grass came from stock footage, if I remember correctly. Kazan gives a funny account of this in his autobiography. He had envisioned on-location shooting, unknowns in the leads, homespun-looking costumes (not the sixteen lovely Walter Plunkett outfits Hepburn wears), etc. The producer, Pandro S. Berman, calls Kazan into his office and shows him the footage of the grass. "That's your grass!" Berman tells him. Tracy is trying to dry out after a bender, and not quite succeeding. He's way overweight; Kazan feels sorry for the horse Tracy's riding. After Tracy films a scene, Hepburn swoops over, saying, "Wasn't Spencer MARVELOUS?" to prevent the relatively new director from demanding retakes. Kazan just wanted to draw a curtain over the whole experience.

And yet, the movie is still so powerful. The farmer/cattleman feud continues, as two incompatible goods. In the modern version, do we preserve the wilderness or build much-needed homes (a hot-button question in California and other places)?

 

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3 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

ALSO, like KEEPER OF THE FLAME, the film is 100% (or close to it) STUDIO SOUNSTAGE SHOT, all the exteriors are rear projections (TRACY probably didn't do location shooting at this stage in the career) and KAZAN hated it for that reason and, like KEEPER OF THE FLAME's obvious interior exteriors, I find the rear projections to be kind of charming and well-filmed and would cite the film as a great example of black and white cinematography.

Thanks for that info on Keeper of the Flame (which I saw for the first time this week) because I found the cinematography 'cool' (yea, that is the technical term I'm going to use!),   and I couldn't figure out why.

E.g. the shot of the burned down house (with Tracy in the foreground and the large logs etc.. in the background.  At first glance it looked somewhat phony but at the same time surreal, and I ended up finding such shots appealing.

 

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9 minutes ago, kingrat said:

And yet, the movie [THE SEA OF GRASS] is still so powerful. The farmer/cattleman feud continues, as two incompatible goods. In the modern version, do we preserve the wilderness or build much-needed homes (a hot-button question in California and other places)?

 

Before watching this movie I was totally unaware of the major ongoing battles throughout history between homesteaders and cattle men- two ways of life that were incompatible yet essential the creation of the nation. (this movie explores the theme even more than SHANE)

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On in the very early morning tonight 11/4 at 5:30 AM is the Sword and Sandal film The Slave 

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I'm not sure if this one has been on TCM before but if it has, it must have been a long time ago.

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Saturday, January 5

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10 a.m.  Popeye: Never Kick a Woman (1933).  Always PC.

 

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11:30 a.m.  Plane Nuts (1933).  Ted Healy and the Stooges.

 

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2:15 a.m.  Modern Times (1936).  I saw this recently on the big screen.  Still fantastic.

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4 hours ago, Bogie56 said:

2:15 a.m.  Modern Times (1936).  I saw this recently on the big screen.  Still fantastic.

I just became very jealous of you! I would love to see it on the big screen, too.

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Hearts of the West at 8:00 PM on Jan 04 is a really good movie.  It also gives a good presentation of what it might have been like to make "westerns" in the 30's and 40's.  Several good character actors in it in addition to a good primary cast.

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15 hours ago, Gershwin fan said:

On in the very early morning tonight 11/4 at 5:30 AM is the Sword and Sandal film The Slave 

MV5BMzY0ODA3OGQtMmI1Yy00YjdiLWE0YTUtMjc5

I'm not sure if this one has been on TCM before but if it has, it must have been a long time ago.

It was shown on TCM last year. I remember seeing a few minutes of it. Lawrence reviewed it in the "I Just Watched" thread.

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Sunday, January 6

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2 a.m.  Colossal Youth (2006).  Portuguese film and Palm d’Or nominee.

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A movie buddy says that Colossal Youth is the sort of art film that people either love or think is a great bore.

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Tomorrow, Sunday January 6, has a lot of good stuff scheduled:

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Night Must Fall (1937) - 7:45 AM ET - I really liked Robert Montgomery in this thriller.

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His Kind of Woman (1951) - 10:00 AM ET - This week's Noir Alley offering isn't for everyone, but I really enjoyed the teaming of Robert Mitchum, Jane Russell, and Vincent Price.

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The Age of Innocence (1993) - 5:30 PM ET - Martin Scorsese surprised everyone with this delicate period romantic drama featuring Daniel Day-Lewis, Michelle Pfeiffer, and Winona Ryder. 

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A Letter to Three Wives (1949) - 8:00 PM ET - Melodrama at its best, with a terrific cast.

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The Letter (1940) - 10:00 PM ET - This is on a lot, but it's enjoyable nonetheless.

Finally, I'm not sure about the schedule for late night, since:

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Dr. Mabuse the Gambler (1922) - 12:00 AM ET - This week's Silent Sunday feature is this German crime epic that made Fritz Lang's name. It's 4 and a half hours long, but is slotted in a 2-hour space, so...

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45 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

 

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Dr. Mabuse the Gambler (1922) - 12:00 AM ET - This week's Silent Sunday feature is this German crime epic that made Fritz Lang's name. It's 4 and a half hours long, but is slotted in a 2-hour space, so...

This one was released in two parts, each two hours long, so it may be only one part.

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7 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Tomorrow, Sunday January 6, has a lot of good stuff scheduled:

...

Finally, I'm not sure about the schedule for late night, since:

MV5BMjEwMzk5MTI1MV5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTgwNDY1

Dr. Mabuse the Gambler (1922) - 12:00 AM ET - This week's Silent Sunday feature is this German crime epic that made Fritz Lang's name. It's 4 and a half hours long, but is slotted in a 2-hour space, so...

It appears this may be another case of a glitch in the way the daily schedule is shown on the web site.  The weekly and monthly schedules are listing Mabuse at 12:00 am followed by Colossal Youth at 4:45 am, with the Hollywood My Hometown documentary dropped from the schedule.  (Morning Glory is also dropped from the Monday morning schedule.)

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For Monday: The Clock is one of the best romantic dramas of the 1940s. Robert Walker and Judy Garland are both charming as a GI and a career girl who meet cute in New York City during his weekend leave.

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Monday, January 7

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10:30 p.m.  Sons of the Desert (1933).  A great send up of the Water Buffalo tradition.

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Tuesday, January 8

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10 p.m. Rio Rita (1942).  Now here’s a plot:  Nazi Agents try to infiltrate a dude ranch.  That’s sure to win the war.

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Wednesday, January 9

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3 a.m.  Man on a Tightrope (1953).  Elia Kazan film with standout performances by Fredric March and Alexander D’Arcy (above) as the strong man.

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On 1/3/2019 at 1:37 PM, LornaHansonForbes said:

Before watching this movie I was totally unaware of the major ongoing battles throughout history between homesteaders and cattle men- two ways of life that were incompatible yet essential the creation of the nation. (this movie explores the theme even more than SHANE)

It goes back even further than that. The Pilgrims essentially/initially got a long with the Native tribes (picture the first Thanksgiving, etc.) as they were essentially both farm based type communities supplementing their agriculture with hunting.

The conflicts started only after the Pilgrims brought domestic animals to the New World. The native had no concept of "free range."  Folks with cattle and pigs would just let them roam free. The cattle would decimate native corn fields while the pigs at low tide would destroy the native oyster beds. The owners of the cattle and pigs would say if you didn't want the livestock in the fields and beds the natives should fence them off. Well that wasn't gonna fly with people with no concept or belief in fences. The Natives would just kill the livestock as they would deer. 

A very interesting book on this very subject was William Cronon's Changes In The Land

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Wednesday evening has four Elia Kazan films, three I like very much and one I haven't seen, Man on a Tightrope. But for earlier in the day Wednesday, don't overlook Deep Valley. Ida Lupino's best performance, and the film is centered on her. Fay Bainter and Henry Hull are outstanding in support as her parents, and this is also the best performance by leading man Dane Clark. One of Jean Negulesco's finest films.

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On 1/6/2019 at 1:07 AM, Bogie56 said:

Monday, January 7

sonsof2.jpg

10:30 p.m.  Sons of the Desert (1933).  A great send up of the Water Buffalo tradition.

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My favorite of tomorrow's films is A Face in the Crowd.  This is a fantastic movie and shows an entirely different side of Andy Griffith.  This movie would make a great double feature with Network.  

I read a rumor that this film was going to receive a Criterion release, but I don't know if that's going to pan out.  I didn't see this hinted at in Criterion's annual New Years drawing.

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