Bogie56

HITS & MISSES: Yesterday, Today & Tomorrow on TCM

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Of course silent films are dated. The understatement of the century. They're silent. Appreciation must be cultivated but if they get to you in a general way (being able to watch them without being comatose) some of them can be just as engrossing as any talk-y. Garbo begins and ends in the silent era for me. She was truly great in silent films. She was truly great in Grand Hotel as well but I can't think of a single talking picture else that moves me --- in the least /// .

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14 hours ago, Gershwin fan said:

My favorite Garbo silents are Gosta Berling and the Kiss. Torrent is really a bit meh but I love that ending.

I can't remember that ending, but I love the ending from The Temptress. So haunting.

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7 hours ago, Bogie56 said:

Thursday, September 12

More Bond, .. James Bond.

76646b94448b7b6ea7641c8ad4f86795.jpg

8 p.m.  On Her Majesty’s Secret Service (1969).  The BFI is showing this as it's the 50th anniversary.  George Lazenby is a pretty good Bond.  It’s a shame he screwed up and self-admittedly was big-headed.  He might have really grown into the part if he had done more.

 

Yeah, I think he gets a bad rap. This is one of my favorite early Bond movies. Great action sequences and Diana Rigg is in it! A bit slow in the beginning, but once it kicks in, hang on to your seat! I plan on watching it again.

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3 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

Oh yeah, I’ve seen NOSFERATU many, many, many times. And if I left it off my list it was by accident. METROPOLIS is great too. I read the book GREED was based on This time last year and absolutely loved it...I tried watching the movie but they had done that thing where they re-inserted lost scenes and showed still photos and I have a hard time When they do that.

It really is more of a personal shortcomings on my part that I can’t make it through silence, I genuinely do have attention deficit disorder. And I tend to be a listener not a watcher.

 

I watched the long Greed, but I had to watch it in installments (the stills version) I thought most of what was cut didnt matter that much. That annoying bag lady was in a lot of those scenes and I couldn't stand her

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42 minutes ago, laffite said:

Of course silent films are dated. The understatement of the century. They're silent. Appreciation must be cultivated but if they get to you in a general way (being able to watch them without being comatose) some of them can be just as engrossing as any talk-y. Garbo begins and ends in the silent era for me. She was truly great in silent films. She was truly great in Grand Hotel as well but I can't think of a single talking picture else that moves me --- in the least /// .

I actually prefer her silent films. I think her voice limited her (with her accent). It's her sound films I was referring to. Most of her early talkies haven't aged well.

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59 minutes ago, Hibi said:

I actually prefer her silent films. I think her voice limited her (with her accent). It's her sound films I was referring to. Most of her early talkies haven't aged well.

I think Garbo's accent was beautiful and helps add an exotic allure to her characters in her films. Her accent certainly wasn't as atrocious as with Vilma Banky for example. :lol:

 

 

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It limited her as to what kind of roles she could play. She couldn't pass as an American.

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I saw FLESH AND THE DEVIL when GARBO was SOTM (last December?) and was TAKEN ABACK by how ELECTRIC and compelling she manages to be in a silent film that is creeping up on being 100 years old.

there is- without a doubt- something very special about her in that film.

4646aa333c6d0b9f4b88a0a58d0458a5--greta-

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5 hours ago, Hibi said:

Yeah, I think he gets a bad rap. This is one of my favorite early Bond movies. Great action sequences and Diana Rigg is in it! A bit slow in the beginning, but once it kicks in, hang on to your seat! I plan on watching it again.

I saw a program about the Bonds over in England and Lazenby spoke about how he royally screwed up.  He came from a modelling background where the 'birds' on Carnaby where literally falling all over him.  He attended the Bond premiere with a beard and that was the final straw.  He was drunk on the experience if you will and the producers thought him highly unprofessional.  And he admits as much today.  Too bad because he made a good Bond.

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I never knew the backstory about why he was dropped. I think he could've been a good Bond over time.

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8 hours ago, Hibi said:

Yeah, I think he [George Lazenby] gets a bad rap. This is one of my favorite early Bond movies. Great action sequences and Diana Rigg is in it! A bit slow in the beginning, but once it kicks in, hang on to your seat! I plan on watching it again.

I agree that Lazenby was better than most give him credit for.  A little more effort by producers and directors and he easily could have become one of the better Bonds.

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Friday, September 13

MV5BM2VhN2Y2YjItMzE4My00MjFhLTg2YzUtOTc0

6 a.m.  Madame X (1929).  Ruth Chatterton was nominated for an Oscar for this performance.  Directed by Lionel Barrymore,

 
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13 hours ago, TheCid said:

I agree that Lazenby was better than most give him credit for.  A little more effort by producers and directors and he easily could have become one of the better Bonds.

I liked Lazenby's portrayal of James Bond too.  He popped up on series television programs after seemingly dropping out of sight.  I remember him from an episode of "The Pretender" on NBC many, many years ago.  I think he played Jared's (Michael T. Weiss) father.

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On 9/10/2019 at 1:35 PM, speedracer5 said:

I think I have to ease myself into silent film--they aren't my favorite. Honestly I tend to get bored, and thus distracted.  I find myself agreeing with Kathy Seldon in Singin' in the Rain when she mocks the overly-theatrical performances.  

I have found that I can enjoy the Chaplin, Keaton and Lloyd films as the physical comedy is entertaining and easy to follow.

But the dramatic films... 

I haven't managed to sit through one yet without being bored out of my mind.  I do have Pandora's Box and It recorded, I'm trying--but it's hard.

 

On 9/10/2019 at 2:12 PM, kingrat said:

Thanks for trying to watch silent movies, even if they are not your favorites. Seeing them with music helps, because that's the way there were shown, although sometimes there are contemporary scores that just won't shut up! Seeing them with an audience can help, too. You might try The Thief of Bagdad, which is longish but has plenty of action and some nice sets and special effects. Many of the dramatic films do seem dated, both in story and in acting style.

I fully understand the difficulty that many people have with silent films. They require more patience because they demand your full attention (plus you have to read sub titles). The music accompanying them (with a score, if you're lucky, by someone like Carl Davis, for example) can play a huge role in their enjoyment.

The Thief of Bagdad, with Douglas Fairbanks in his dashing athletic prime (the forerunner to Flynn, Speedy) which kingrat cited, was the first silent film that made me wonder if I had been missing out of something as I had had an earlier inclination to avoid silents.

I always remember when I introduced my mother, who had seen few silents outside of Chaplin, to Rudolph Valentino. She had seen clips of the actor over emoting (probably from The Sheik)  and agreed to watch him, but she was clearly ready to laugh at him.

So I picked The Eagle (1925), the actor's second last film and an action adventure with Rudy as a sort of Russian Zorro-type character. If you can find a nice looking print, The Eagle is pictorially attractive. It has a fair amount of horseback action scenes, as well as a surprising amount of humour, some of it even rather subtle. Valentino showed that he could successfully play humour in this film.

In any event, my Mom, not a fan of silent films nor very knowledgeable about them,  was captured by Valentino in this film, commenting afterward that she could understand why women were attracted to him (some men were, too, of course). So the selection of the silent that you choose is important and a well crafted costume film with action, romance and humour like The Eagle is one that I would recommend for silent film neophytes. Valentino's last film, the tongue-in-cheek Son of the Sheik (which TCM has shown on occasion), would be another good pick.

eagle-1925-image-9.jpg?resize=400,300

 

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please don't think I'm HATIN ON TCM for making what was probably a savvy yardsale acquisition of all the BOND FILMS, i have just never been able to muster even the SLIGHTEST interest in them...outside of A VIEW TO A KILL, which I really just like to think of as GRACE JONES: THE MOVIE.

(TRUE STORY- 8 year old me cried in the theater when she dies.)

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...I even say the one with DANIEL CRAIG where he and that SALTY OLD EWOK were hiding out in the house...SKYFALL?

(Ugh, I wish it would.)

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I don't care much for the Roger Moore ones, not that they weren't good, but I didn't care for him as Bond that much. But I liked the later Bonds. The Grace Jones one I liked a bit more!

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Yaphet Kotto made a pretty good villain in Live and Let Die (1973) but my favourite Roger Moore was The Spy Who Loved Me (1977).  Barbara Bach!

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1 hour ago, Hibi said:

I don't care much for the Roger Moore ones, not that they weren't good, but I didn't care for him as Bond that much. But I liked the later Bonds. The Grace Jones one I liked a bit more!

Yes, a HUGE PART Of my apathy to the BOND franchise is because I grew up in the 1980s, and didn’t have access to the Connery titles and I grew up with Roger Moore, who never impressed me, and Timothy Dalton, who I like in other things, just not the Bond movies.

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7 minutes ago, Bogie56 said:

Yaphet Kotto made a pretty good villain in Live and Let Die (1973) but my favourite Roger Moore was The Spy Who Loved Me (1977).  Barbara Bach!

I think you mean “LIVE AND LEEEET DIIIIIIIEEEEEEYYYYYIIIIIEEEEEE”

(cue rapid music cresendo)

🎶🎶BUMP UMP UMP BUMP UMP UMP, UMPON🎶🎶🎶

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God, I hated that song. And it was on 90% of the soundtrack. I liked the first Dalton Bond film, but not the second.

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2 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

please don't think I'm HATIN ON TCM for making what was probably a savvy yardsale acquisition of all the BOND FILMS, i have just never been able to muster even the SLIGHTEST interest in them...outside of A VIEW TO A KILL, which I really just like to think of as GRACE JONES: THE MOVIE.

(TRUE STORY- 8 year old me cried in the theater when she dies.)

I'm not a big fan of the Bond films either. They seem like the same movie over and over again.  

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4:15 PM ET, Thursday:  Come Fly With Me. An enjoyable romantic movie from the 60's, but not overly gushy.

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I think maybe some people  (maybe only a few)  might like the silent films better if they didn't start with the big action movies, but tried the quiet dramas like Lillian Gish in, "The Wind" or Gloria Swanson in, "Sadie Thompson." There's something about them that involves me very deeply, almost as though I'm dreaming the movie and I tend to completely forget that it's silent.  Maybe it's because I have to watch it more closely that I tend to get really lost in the character.  I cry over Sadie Thompson every time and I rarely cry at movies at all.   The silent version of "Stella Dallas," is another tear jerker but then so is the later Barbara Stanwyck version.

As for being dated, I love that part.  It's like stepping into a time warp.

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