Bogie56

HITS & MISSES: Yesterday, Today & Tomorrow on TCM

7,886 posts in this topic

These rights issues can really be maddening. Assuming that someone does own Canadian  rights to some of these films why don't they capitalize on that and make some easy money, I sure would.  Do they have some ridiculous idea of what the values are and demand so much that no one is willing to pay the fee?  By  being too greedy they end up with nothing.  If by chance no one is sure who owns the rights  consider the films to be in a public domain status, and then if someone does come forward with legal proof of having ownership a fee can be negotiated. If the owner demands some ridiculous sum then take it to court and let a judge decide on a fair equitable settlement.

A couple of years ago I was speaking to the manager of a Toronto DVD store. He had a considerable number of people visiting his establishment and once told me that he had received a visit from one individual who claimed to know the person who had the Canadian rights to the Roach material. He said that, of all things, it was owned by a priest (!!!).

 

I asked the store manager if he could possibly get more precise information about the copy write owner if that person returned to his store again. He never did get it, nor was I really certain if he was talking about DVD sales rights or television broadcast rights.

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These rights issues can really be maddening. Assuming that someone does own Canadian  rights to some of these films why don't they capitalize on that and make some easy money, I sure would.  Do they have some ridiculous idea of what the values are and demand so much that no one is willing to pay the fee?  By  being too greedy they end up with nothing.  If by chance no one is sure who owns the rights  consider the films to be in a public domain status, and then if someone does come forward with legal proof of having ownership a fee can be negotiated. If the owner demands some ridiculous sum then take it to court and let a judge decide on a fair equitable settlement.

Yes.  It is money for old rope.  I'd take whatever for a film that is 90 years old.

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A couple of years ago I was speaking to the manager of a Toronto DVD store. He had a considerable number of people visiting his establishment and once told me that he had received a visit from one individual who claimed to know the person who had the Canadian rights to the Roach material. He said that, of all things, it was owned by a priest (!!!).

 

I asked the store manager if he could possibly get more precise information about the copy write owner if that person returned to his store again. He never did get it, nor was I really certain if he was talking about DVD sales rights or television broadcast rights.

A Priest?  What is the guy laying on a bed of nails somewhere in the frozen North watching all the L&H silents over and over and over and over again?

"Tell TCM to go away.  No earthly sum can possibly sway me."

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Tuesday, May 19

 

6 a.m.  Jesse Ventura’s Conspiracy Theory followed by Gunsmoke.  Oops, I’m looking at the UK TCM schedule again.

 

Interesting though.  They seem to have a day of road movies which kicks off with John Ford’s Stagecoach (1939)

 

:) 

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Mon., 5-18

10:15 PM
B/W

93 min

TV-PG

horror

An ambitious duke uses his executioner henchman to kill his way to the crown.

Dir: Rowland V. Lee Cast:  Basil Rathbone , Boris Karloff , Barbara O'Neil .

 

-- fun version of dark story. Basil & Boris delightfully evil :D

 

 

 

So Mr.6. Am I confused here or did I just hear recently that they just found Basil Rathbone's bones under some parking lot over there somewhere???

 

(...sorry, couldn't resist) ;)

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The Late Show (1977)

 

Tuesday at midnight. Art Carney and Lily Tomlin.

 

Love those 70's offerings. Keep 'em coming, TCM.

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TOWER OF LONDON is hardly ever on and it is excellent.  Highly recommended for horror fans.  Basil and Boris are great plus Vincent Price, too.  Don't miss this one!

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Tuesday, May 19

 

At 3:45 p.m. TCM is showing Blake Edwards’ Days of Wine and Roses (1962).

HoldenIsHere was just talking about this film in the ‘Performances that Surprised You’ thread.

 

At midnight is one of Art Carney’s better screen efforts, The Late Show (1977) in which he plays a gumshoe.

It features a fine performance by Bill Macy who I believe is 93 tomorrow on the 18th.  Happy birthday, Bill.

 

I see at 11:50 p.m. they have a ‘making of’ short on International Velvet.  Its star, Tantrum O’Neal made a film in Canada a few years later called, Circle of Two (1981).  I was told that she got the nickname Tantrum on set, partially because of her habit of dropping whatever prop was in her hands as soon as the director yelled ‘cut.’  Piece of china, whatever.  It must have been torture for those seasoned pros Jules Dassin and Richard Burton

 

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It's official - Dargo has lost it.  Mason lacked physicality?!!!  Puleese.  The man exuded dangerous sexuality and, indeed, that was his trademark.  It's true that he toned it down when he went to Hollywood (more's the pity).  His acting was nuanced and subtle, and didn't fit  the expectations of American audiences.  Europeans got it.

 

No one, except Grant, could steal scenes like Mason.  Wrong again Dargo.

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The Late Show (1977)

 

Tuesday at midnight. Art Carney and Lily Tomlin.

 

Love those 70's offerings. Keep 'em coming, TCM.

 

Yes, I love American movies from the 1970s.

There's a promo that TCM has aired about Hollywood's Second Golden Age that focuses on movies from the 1970s. 

I hope an actor who made a lot of movies in the 1970's is one of the Summer Under The Stars honorees this year.

Last year Faye Dunaway had a day. It was my favorite Summer Under The Stars day.

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Yes, I love American movies from the 1970s.

There's a promo that TCM has aired about Hollywood's Second Golden Age that focuses on movies from the 1970s. 

I hope an actor who made a lot of movies in the 1970's is one of the Summer Under The Stars honorees this year.

Last year Faye Dunaway had a day. It was my favorite Summer Under The Stars day.

Ellen Burstyn would be an interesting choice.  They should even show her in her Canadian film, Silence of the North

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Just want to add to my post re' TOWER OF LONDON.  It's directed by Rowland V. Lee who also directed SON OF FRANKENSTEIN.  I agree there were some fine movies in the 1970s for adults before the onslaught of over-bloated comic book movies and computer effects and other stuff designed for youngsters.  It's not that I hate that stuff; I loved the original STAR WARS and JAWS but I just think it's gone overboard.

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It's official - Dargo has lost it.  Mason lacked physicality?!!!  Puleese.  The man exuded dangerous sexuality and, indeed, that was his trademark.  It's true that he toned it down when he went to Hollywood (more's the pity).  His acting was nuanced and subtle, and didn't fit  the expectations of American audiences.  Europeans got it.

 

No one, except Grant, could steal scenes like Mason.  Wrong again Dargo.

 

;)

 

Sorry manderstroke ol' boy, but while bein' a good ol' 'Merican boy here(okay okay...a 63 year old "boy" anyway), first, I've still always loved watching James Mason in any movie I've ever seen him in and always have appreciated his unique style, manner, voice and his great acting ability, and secondly, and once again thought his line delivery as good as it always was in the '52 remake of "Zenda", I still think that OTHER "good ol' 'Merican boy", who would like Cary Grant, seemed to sport that there Mid-Atlantic accent, one Douglas Fairbanks Junior, was JUST a little better in and better suited for the role of the snide, light-on-his-feet and devil-may-care..errr I mean "wicked rascality" (thanks again slayton) Rupert of Hentzau.

 

And 'cause primarily the Rubert character was supposed to be the greatest swordsman in all of "Ruritania", and sorry, but I don't recall James bein' cast in a whole lot of swashbucklers like Junior was, and like, say, when those swords were curved like in a Sinbad flick.

 

(...btw...WHY is there a freakin' "w" in the word "sword"?...oh those English...first it's always those weird little letter "u"s they put in words that don't need 'em, and then occasionally slip in one of those DOUBLE-u's into a word that doesn't need it TOO!!!)

 

;)

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I concede your point that some Americans had the taste and intelligence to appreciate Mr. Mason.  Hell, I'm from Kansas and it doesn't get any more low brow than that (well, maybe Mississippi).  Being in the minority has never bothered me, I've always preferred the odd man out to the norm.  At any rate, both Ruperts were delightful, but, as you know, I do have a slight bias.  Actually, I thought the remake would have been a dreary affair if not for Mason.  Granger and Kerr were yawn inducing.  I did love the scene where, after talk of boar hunting, Granger and Calhern enter, and Rupert remarks, "And here are the boors."

 

 

 

Changing the subject, the TCM film noir online course sounds intriguing.  I signed up for it.

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Also looking forward to 'Nadine' (1987). Haven't seen it.

 

I love Jeff Bridges.

 

Remember when Kim Basinger was the hottest babe in movies?

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Also looking forward to 'Nadine' (1987). Haven't seen it.

 

I love Jeff Bridges.

 

Remember when Kim Basinger was the hottest babe in movies?

I'm a big fan of Nadine and think Basinger is quite good in it.  It is one of those films that I'm looking forward to seeing again to see if my original opinion of it holds up.  Catch it for sure.

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I am renaming and rebranding Bogie56's ‘Tomorrow: Don’t Miss' thread.  For the time being it is going to be know as

 

Hits & Misses: Yesterday, Today & Tomorrow on TCM

 

Basically, the idea is for it to serve as a forum to talk about the films that YOU like and dislike on the current TCM schedule.  Or films that you are curious about and want to see or to steer clear of.  Whatever YOU like.

 

Films that you've just seen perhaps; films on right now and films coming up in short order.

 

Perhaps it may also be an opportunity to talk about some of these films that may not fit so easily into a discussion in another thread. 

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Just want to add to my post re' TOWER OF LONDON.  It's directed by Rowland V. Lee who also directed SON OF FRANKENSTEIN.  I agree there were some fine movies in the 1970s for adults before the onslaught of over-bloated comic book movies and computer effects and other stuff designed for youngsters.  It's not that I hate that stuff; I loved the original STAR WARS and JAWS but I just think it's gone overboard.

way overboard! all Hollywood is churning out now is cgi fests for fifteen year olds.

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Tuesday, May 19

 

At midnight is one of Art Carney’s better screen efforts, The Late Show (1977) in which he plays a gumshoe.

It features a fine performance by Bill Macy who I believe is 93 tomorrow on the 18th.  Happy birthday, Bill.

 

Wednesday, May 20

 

For once I would wish that the Canadian schedule was different that the American one.

 

Wednesday night sees some of Hayden’s worst films lumped together here in one evening.  

 

But if you still have yet to see Nicolas Ray’s Johnny Guitar, you may want to check it out.

 

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caught this from 'moira finnie' @ SSO

"Heads up: ICE FOLLIES OF 1939 is on TCM on Wednesday, May 20@ 1:45pm (ET). You haven't lived until you have seen Jimmy Stewart & Lee Ayres in tights on ice. See if you can tell if Joan Crawford actually skates in this movie. I tend to think it might be her hardworking stand-up in most shots."

:D

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caught this from 'moira finnie' @ SSO

"Heads up: ICE FOLLIES OF 1939 is on TCM on Wednesday, May 20@ 1:45pm (ET). You haven't lived until you have seen Jimmy Stewart & Lee Ayres in tights on ice. See if you can tell if Joan Crawford actually skates in this movie. I tend to think it might be her hardworking stand-up in most shots."

:D

Crawford felt this was (one of) the nadir(s) of her career at MGM. After being labelled "boxoffice poision", and having it proven with the tepid boxoffice of her 1938 releases, it seems the studio threw her into this with little regard for her or her strengths, as they tried to contemporize her image. So they gave her a Sonja Henie plot (who was doing great at the boxoffice), and a Hedy Lamarr black wig (who had just caused a sensation in ALGIERS). It can be fun, but it had no lasting impsct on Joan's career, either vood or bad.

 

Luckily, Joan next set her sights on a choice role, Crystal in THE WOMEN, despite its limited screentime, and scored a personal triumph. Her career was back on top.

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also Wed., 5-20

these sound good....

 
6:00 am ET
B/W
69 min
TV-PG
crime

A hard-drinking reporter specializes in murder cases, until he becomes a suspect in one himself.

DirTim Whelan CastSpencer Tracy , Virginia Bruce , Lionel Atwill .

LEONARD MALTIN REVIEW:

D: Tim Whelan. Cast: Spencer Tracy, Virginia Bruce, Lionel Atwill, Harvey Stephens, Robert Barrat, James Stewart.

"Tracy is good as usual playing a hard-drinking newspaper reporter who specializes in covering murders. Snappy little film also offers Stewart in his first feature appearance (playing a fellow reporter named Shorty)."

 

10:30 am ET
B/W
81 min
TV-G
crime

When a notorious gangster gets out of prison, he vows revenge on the wife who left him.

DirEdward Ludwig CastEdward G. Robinson , James Stewart , Rose Stradner .

 LEONARD MALTIN REVIEW:

D: Edward Ludwig. Edward G. Robinson, James Stewart, Rosa Stradner, Lionel Stander, Douglas Scott, John Carradine, Sidney Blackmer, Louise Beavers, Edward Brophy, Grant Mitchell. "Robinson's dynamic performance, and slick MGM production, elevate this tale of an underworld chief who's sent away for ten years, obsessed by the thought of the son he's never met. Entertaining story by William Wellman and Robert Carson was originally to have been called Another Public Enemy."

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also Wed., 5-20

these sound good....

 
6:00 am ET
B/W

69 min

TV-PG

crime

A hard-drinking reporter specializes in murder cases, until he becomes a suspect in one himself.

Dir: Tim Whelan Cast:  Spencer Tracy , Virginia Bruce , Lionel Atwill .

LEONARD MALTIN REVIEW:

D: Tim Whelan. Cast: Spencer Tracy, Virginia Bruce, Lionel Atwill, Harvey Stephens, Robert Barrat, James Stewart.

"Tracy is good as usual playing a hard-drinking newspaper reporter who specializes in covering murders. Snappy little film also offers Stewart in his first feature appearance (playing a fellow reporter named Shorty)."

 

10:30 am ET
B/W

81 min

TV-G

crime

When a notorious gangster gets out of prison, he vows revenge on the wife who left him.

Dir: Edward Ludwig Cast:  Edward G. Robinson , James Stewart , Rose Stradner .

 LEONARD MALTIN REVIEW:

D: Edward Ludwig. Edward G. Robinson, James Stewart, Rosa Stradner, Lionel Stander, Douglas Scott, John Carradine, Sidney Blackmer, Louise Beavers, Edward Brophy, Grant Mitchell. "Robinson's dynamic performance, and slick MGM production, elevate this tale of an underworld chief who's sent away for ten years, obsessed by the thought of the son he's never met. Entertaining story by William Wellman and Robert Carson was originally to have been called Another Public Enemy."

I'm probably gonna regret it, because I dislike Spencer Tracy (but I loathed Raymond Burr in yesterday's The Blue Gardenia, that shot of him vamping on the telephone operator's work station was disgusting), but I'll give today's The Murder Man a try.

 

Tomorrow, who knows?

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Today at 5 pm eastern, as.part of TCM's daytime.tribute to James Stewart, they will show POT O'GOLD, an enjoyable 1941 comedy with big band music, and the always delectable Paulette Goddard. This was one of several Paramount features that the studio sold to UA around the time we got involved.in WW2, due to the plethora of product of the one, and the dearth of same of the other.

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also Wed., 5-20

these sound good....

 

 

 

6:00 am ET

B/W

69 min

TV-PG

 

 

crime

 

 

Murder Man, The (1935)

 

A hard-drinking reporter specializes in murder cases, until he becomes a suspect in one himself.

 

Dir: Tim Whelan Cast:  Spencer Tracy , Virginia Bruce , Lionel Atwill .

 

LEONARD MALTIN REVIEW:

D: Tim Whelan. Cast: Spencer Tracy, Virginia Bruce, Lionel Atwill, Harvey Stephens, Robert Barrat, James Stewart.

"Tracy is good as usual playing a hard-drinking newspaper reporter who specializes in covering murders. Snappy little film also offers Stewart in his first feature appearance (playing a fellow reporter named Shorty)."

 

 

 

10:30 am ET

B/W

81 min

TV-G

 

 

crime

 

 

Last Gangster, The (1937)

 

When a notorious gangster gets out of prison, he vows revenge on the wife who left him.

 

Dir: Edward Ludwig Cast:  Edward G. Robinson , James Stewart , Rose Stradner .

 

 LEONARD MALTIN REVIEW:

D: Edward Ludwig. Edward G. Robinson, James Stewart, Rosa Stradner, Lionel Stander, Douglas Scott, John Carradine, Sidney Blackmer, Louise Beavers, Edward Brophy, Grant Mitchell. "Robinson's dynamic performance, and slick MGM production, elevate this tale of an underworld chief who's sent away for ten years, obsessed by the thought of the son he's never met. Entertaining story by William Wellman and Robert Carson was originally to have been called Another Public Enemy."

THE LAST GANGSTER features Rosa Stradner, MGM's latest Austrian import, which they used as a backstop/implicit threat to Louise Rainer, who was already displaying temperamental behavior towards her movie roles.

 

Stradner met Joseph Mankiewicz while both were under contract at.the studio, and they shortly married. Speaking.of temperamental behavior, the highstrung, bipolar Stradner gave Mank some moments during their approximately 20 years of marriage (not that his philandering with his leading ladies didn't give her cause), until she committed suicide in 1958, after.many threats, and maybe an attempt or two. She was a good actress though, if not featured often enough. Perhaps her last good role was in KEYS OF THE KINGDOM.

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