Bogie56

HITS & MISSES: Yesterday, Today & Tomorrow on TCM

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Thursday, May 21


 


Doris Day all day followed by maritime disaster pictures.


 


The only memorable film in the lot in my book is Roy Ward Baker’s brilliant, A Night to Remember (1958).


It differs quite a bit in approach from the Clifton Webb, Barbara Stanwyck film, Titanic (1953) which was also very good.


 


The Stanwyck, Webb version certainly tugs at the heartstrings with more success.  I’m a sucker for the scene where Webb’s son steps off the lifeboat to stay with his father.


A Night to Remember is more of a chronicle in the best drama/docudrama tradition that the Brits were so good at.


It heaps irony upon irony as the clock ticks down and the ship sinks.


Shot by Geoffrey Unsworth.  Eric Ambler’s screenplay from the Walter Lord book.


It also features a brilliant soundtrack by the great English sound editor, Harry Miller.  When the ship’s funnel blasts as the engine room fills it is a moment of absolute dread.


 

 

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Thursday, May 21

 

Doris Day all day followed by maritime disaster pictures.

 

The only memorable film in the lot in my book is Roy Ward Baker’s brilliant, A Night to Remember (1958).

It differs quite a bit in approach from the Clifton Webb, Barbara Stanwyck film, Titanic (1953) which was also very good.

 

The Stanwyck, Webb version certainly tugs at the heartstrings with more success.  I’m a sucker for the scene where Webb’s son steps off the lifeboat to stay with his father.

A Night to Remember is more of a chronicle in the best drama/docudrama tradition that the Brits were so good at.

It heaps irony upon irony as the clock ticks down and the ship sinks.

Shot by Geoffrey Unsworth.  Eric Ambler’s screenplay from the Walter Lord book.

It also features a brilliant soundtrack by the great English sound editor, Harry Miller.  When the ship’s funnel blasts as the engine room fills it is a moment of absolute dread.

They could have bridged the two segments tomorrow, first Doris Day, then shipboard disasters, with Day's film debut, ROMANCE ON THE HIGH SEAS. Oh wait, the ship stays afloat and suffers no more than a few broken hearts aboard.

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Friday, May 22

 

Looks like this day offers something for just about everyone.

 

Olivier during the day kicks off with an early one that I didn’t particularly care for, Friends and Lovers (1931) but finishes with A Little Romance (1979) with features a very good performance by newcomer, Diane Lane.

 

Eileen Herlie is very good as Gertrude in Hamlet.  Just looking at the imdb blurb on her and it says that she was 11 years younger than Oliver when she made this.  Apparently she disappeared into soap opera land in, All My Children.

 

Followed by a mini-Welles fest in the evening.  The Immortal Story is pretty interesting but suffers a little due to lack of budget.  It is a bit rough looking.

 

Rembrandt (1936) and The Moon and Sixpence feature some tremendous performances, particularly Rover Livesey and Gertude Lawrence in Rembrandt.

 

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Eileen Herlie is very good as Gertrude in Hamlet.  Just looking at the imdb blurb on her and it says that she was 11 years younger than Oliver when she made this.  Apparently she disappeared into soap opera land in, All My Children.

 

Ms. Herlie did indeed work in soaps, but she did a lot of theater as well, including repeating her role of Gertrude to Richard Burton's Hamlet in 1964, directed by John Gielgud in a production also starring Hume Cronyn, Alfred Drake, and John Gielgud as the Ghost. Her theater credits also include the short-lived musical All American, in which she sings (with Ray Bolger) one of Broadway's most beautiful songs.

 

 

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The Moon and Sixpence is a new fav of mine. Kinda takes "The Red Shoes' theme of life vs. lifework to, perhaps, an extreme conclusion. Sanders is perfect as the not too conflicted artist.

 

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Misses: The Prince and the Showgirl (on tomorrow at 11am PST).  I saw this movie I think the last time it was on.  I'm a big fan of Marilyn Monroe and I wanted to like this film.  I wanted to like it, I really did.  Monroe looked beautiful as usual and apparently her production company also produced this film.  She was given about 3/4 of the film's profits.  I had also never seen Laurence Olivier in a film.  He also directed this one.  I must say, despite all the issues that Olivier had with Monroe during the making of this movie, I found Monroe more interesting.  I don't know what it is about Olivier, but he leaves me cold-- like many of the Shakespearean actors do (with the exception of Orson Welles).  

 

Hits: I really loved The Stranger with Welles and Edward G Robinson.  This was a great noir with two of my favorite actors.  I also love the style of the film and it's overall aesthetic.  I'm definitely recording this again so I can see it.  Such a great movie. 

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Misses: The Prince and the Showgirl (on tomorrow at 11am PST).  I saw this movie I think the last time it was on.  I'm a big fan of Marilyn Monroe and I wanted to like this film.  I wanted to like it, I really did.  Monroe looked beautiful as usual and apparently her production company also produced this film.  She was given about 3/4 of the film's profits.  I had also never seen Laurence Olivier in a film.  He also directed this one.  I must say, despite all the issues that Olivier had with Monroe during the making of this movie, I found Monroe more interesting.  I don't know what it is about Olivier, but he leaves me cold-- like many of the Shakespearean actors do (with the exception of Orson Welles).  

 

Hits: I really loved The Stranger with Welles and Edward G Robinson.  This was a great noir with two of my favorite actors.  I also love the style of the film and it's overall aesthetic.  I'm definitely recording this again so I can see it.  Such a great movie.

 

I really like THE PRINCE.AND THE SHOWGIRL; maybe like you, I wanted to really like it, but I ended up really liking it.

 

THE STRANGER also has a very good performance from Loretta Young as the hapless wife.

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I really like THE PRINCE.AND THE SHOWGIRL; maybe like you, I wanted to really like it, but I ended up really liking it.

 

THE STRANGER also has a very good performance from Loretta Young as the hapless wife.

 

Maybe I need to give The Prince and the Showgirl another chance? I feel like Olivier was almost trying too hard? I don't know if that's the right term.  He just wasn't doing anything for me.  Maybe I'll give TPATS another whirl on the DVR and see if I like it better.

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Misses: The Prince and the Showgirl (on tomorrow at 11am PST).  I saw this movie I think the last time it was on.  I'm a big fan of Marilyn Monroe and I wanted to like this film.  I wanted to like it, I really did.  Monroe looked beautiful as usual and apparently her production company also produced this film.  She was given about 3/4 of the film's profits.  I had also never seen Laurence Olivier in a film.  He also directed this one.  I must say, despite all the issues that Olivier had with Monroe during the making of this movie, I found Monroe more interesting.  I don't know what it is about Olivier, but he leaves me cold-- like many of the Shakespearean actors do (with the exception of Orson Welles).  

 

I didn't like The Prince and the Showgirl either.   Have you seen My Week With Marilyn yet?  It is based not he making of that film and Kenneth Branagh and Michelle Williams are pretty good as Olivier and Monroe.  At least you have to give Williams her due for having the courage to take on the part of Marilyn.  I mean it is a bit beyond just posing as Marilyn in front of Grauman's for the tourists.

 

So, I am curious to see these two films again when I can watch them back-to-back.

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I didn't like The Prince and the Showgirl either.   Have you seen My Week With Marilyn yet?  It is based not he making of that film and Kenneth Branagh and Michelle Williams are pretty good as Olivier and Monroe.  At least you have to give Williams her due for having the courage to take on the part of Marilyn.  I mean it is a bit beyond just posing as Marilyn in front of Grauman's for the tourists.

 

So, I am curious to see these two films again when I watch them back-to-back.

I haven't seen My Week With Marilyn yet.  I wanted to see it.  I heard it was really good and I think Michelle Williams was even nominated for an Oscar for it.  It's still on the Netflix Instant Queue.  I should just watch it one of these days.  I'm glad to hear that it sounds like Williams actually tried to bring the real Marilyn to life and didn't just go for a Marilyn Monroe impression.  There is so much more to Monroe than the image that seems to be idolized by the teenage girls and 20 and 30-somethings--whom I imagine have never actually seen a Marilyn Monroe film.  They just love her image--she epitomizes sexuality. 

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Eileen Herlie is very good as Gertrude in Hamlet.  Just looking at the imdb blurb on her and it says that she was 11 years younger than Oliver when she made this.  Apparently she disappeared into soap opera land in, All My Children.

 

And a fine job she did, playing Myrtle Fargate for over 30 years.  :)

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Friday, May 22

 

Looks like this day offers something for just about everyone.

 

Olivier during the day kicks off with an early one that I didn’t particularly care for, Friends and Lovers (1931) but finishes with A Little Romance (1979) with features a very good performance by newcomer, Diane Lane.

 

Eileen Herlie is very good as Gertrude in Hamlet.  Just looking at the imdb blurb on her and it says that she was 11 years younger than Oliver when she made this.  Apparently she disappeared into soap opera land in, All My Children.

 

Followed by a mini-Welles fest in the evening.  The Immortal Story is pretty interesting but suffers a little due to lack of budget.  It is a bit rough looking.

 

Rembrandt (1936) and The Moon and Sixpence feature some tremendous performances, particularly Rover Livesey and Gertude Lawrence in Rembrandt.

 

Olivier during the day kicks off with an early one that I didn’t particularly care for, Friends and Lovers (1931)

 

I kinda liked it. I used to like Olivier way back when - first saw him in Wuthering Heights, why is that missing? - but now I can see Lily Damita going for Menjou over him. Who knew Olivier could be so boring.

 

Did Damita belong to the Pola Negri, Vilma Banke school of unacting? I can see why my father liked them all, they're clones of each other.

 

For once, I didn't mind Hugh Herbert, and the old man who owned the house was quite funny - man, that musta been some heating bill he had.

 

No worse than any of Pat O'Brien's movies.

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I really enjoy THE PRINCE AND THE SHOWGIRL, which aired today on TCM.

 

Marilyn Monroe's talent, charm and beauty really shine in this movie.

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Is it Memorial Day weekend, or something?

 

A heck of a lot of USAF films on during the day.  I’m guessing that all of them have been shown over and over again fairly recently.

 

FYI, the Canadian schedule lists a couple of short subjects that are probably on the U.S. schedule too but just not noted.

 

The day kicks off at 6 a.m. with Sloppy Seconds Over Tokyo.

  • with apologies to the Second City Revue

 

Twelve O’Clock High at 5:50 is a classic.  

 

Then it is Civil war films in the evening.  Are they all repeats from recent times too?

 

If someone knows how to attach a good screen shot of the daily schedule to this thread it would be appreciated.

 

- the global village idiot.

 

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My pick for this morning is Dive Bomber with Errol Flynn, Fred MacMurray, Ralph Bellamy and Alexis Smith.  In this film, MacMurray actually has the showier part as the dive bomber.  Flynn and Bellamy play doctors at the military base who spend most of the film trying to invent a flight suit that will protect pilots from altitude sickness.  For much of the film, Flynn and MacMurray are rivals as MacMurray blames Flynn for his friend's death on the operating table.  This film is also notable for being the first credited role for Alexis Smith.  Her character is introduced as a means to drive a further wedge between Flynn and MacMurray.  She meets MacMurray at a party and agrees to go to dinner with him, only to spot Flynn at the same party.  She and Flynn dated in the past and old embers are re-ignited when they see each other again... much to MacMurray's chagrin.  

 

My only complaints with this film is that it is a bit long and the minor subplot of the pilot trying to escape his Brooklyn wife.  Those brief scenes are annoying and not funny. 

 

The real star of the film is the Technicolor.  This film looks so beautiful that it (for me at least), makes up for any of the shortcomings that it may have.

 

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(I might add that for me, the whole point of this film is Errol Flynn in uniform and white tuxedos... But the film is very good too, lol)

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My favorite isn't on until Monday and TCM shows it frequently, but I have to recommend Battleground (1949). A story about the Screaming Eagles in the Battle of the Bulge. Stars Van Johnson, John Hodiak, George Murphy, Ricardo Montalban, Douglas Fowley, Jerome Courtland, Marshall Thompson, Danielle Darrieux, and memorably James Whitmore. It's one of the first movies I remember watching at the drive in with my parents. I love it.

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Sunday, May 24

 

The daytime schedule kicks off with a few Bogie WWII pictures.  

 

1943’ Sahara is probably my favourite.  Bogie, J. Carroll Naish and Rex Ingram are particularly good.  The scene where Ingram has his big black hands on the back of the Nazi’s blonde hair and smothers him in the sand is quite powerful indeed.

 

Of note in the evening for the Canuck viewers is that Jean Renoir’s Grand Illusion is replaced by a pretty good Marcello Mastroianni picture, Family Diary.

 

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On Wednesday May 27 TCM is airing THE STAR (1952) with Bette Davis as Margaret Elliot, an aging movie star --- a role that really hit close to home for Bette Davis at this time. 

The movie also features Natalie Wood as Davis's teenage daughter.

One of my favorite parts is when Bette Davis gets drunk and takes her Oscar for a drive around Beverly Hills and gets thrown in jail. 

Oh, and also the part when she plays her screen test for the role of the older sister as a flirtatious ingenue and then cringes when she sees the footage.

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One of my picks is Bataan, airing tomorrow.  This film stars Robert Taylor, George Murphy and Robert Walker.  The film is a telling of the story of the Battle of Bataan in The Philippines.  A bunch of soldiers from different companies were assembled and were assigned to blow up a large bridge and then sabotage the Japanese's efforts in rebuilding.  The soldiers set up shop in the hillside prepared to defend.  The rest of the movie involves the various defenders being killed by the enemy and succumbing to other maladies, like malaria.  Believe it or not, in my opinion, the highlight of the film is the performance of a young Desi Arnaz portraying Mexican-American, Felix Ramirez. 

 

On Tuesday, May 26, I recommend The Crimson Pirate, starring Burt Lancaster.  This is a fun Technicolor swashbuckler.  Burt Lancaster performed his own acrobatics and fills out a pair of torn pirate pants very well.  While there is a dramatic storyline, Lancaster and co-star Nick Cravat (who portrays a mute pirate) provide many comedic touches to lighten up the mood of the film. 

 

I also second Holden's recommendation of The Star on Wednesday, May 27. 

 

 

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Anyone watch any of the TCM films on Saturday?

 

Sloppy Seconds Over Tokyo ?

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Looks like the Viet Nam War gets short-shrift again this year.(except for "Green Berets" which don't hardly count). Ain't 45 yrs. (or so) old enough to be considered 'classic'?!

 

Maybe Vietnam movies - essentially, movies about a wrong war that the U.S. lost, may not be what TCM considers Memorial Day-friendly?

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Probably most of the films about Vietnam Nam are very raw and graphic not that family friendly for daytime showings. Maybe things like Platoon or Apocalypse Now are expensive. Could be many reasons that have nothing to do with the outcome of the war.

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