speedracer5

I Just Watched...

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This thread is intended for people to share their thoughts on films that they recently saw.  I also made a counter thread "A Waste of Space on the DVR" for those films that were total duds.  This is not limited to films seen on TCM.

 

I just watched a few films:

 

Wabash Avenue.  I just saw this film with Betty Grable and Victor Mature.  I remember last summer, Dargo tried to get me to like Mature more.  While I did like him in I Wake Up Screaming, I can never see him as the supposed heartthrob that he was supposed to be.  Mature does absolutely nothing for me--lookswise.  I do like him as smarmy characters.  He seems to do smarmy well.  Betty Grable was beautiful as always and wore many costumes to show off her great legs.  This film was entertaining when I watched it, but is ultimately forgettable. 

 

The Avengers: Age of Ultron.  This was a great film.  While it was heavy on the CGI, it was a fun film with an interesting plot.   James Spader was great as the voice of the villain, Ultron.  The Avengers themselves were also fun, and I thought it was interesting how the filmmakers worked around Scarlett Johanssen's pregnancy (stunt doubles & CGI).  I also like that the group seems to be evolving and making room for two new Avengers: The Scarlet Witch (played very well by The Olsen Twins' sister, Elizabeth Olsen) and Falcon.  I look forward to the next film and the next superhero film in the Marvel franchise-- Ant-Man starring Paul Rudd and Michael Douglas. 

 

Mr. Deeds Goes to Town.  I recorded this film for Jean Arthur.  I'll have to admit right here that I've seen three Capra films: It Happened One Night, Mr. Smith Goes to Washington and Arsenic and Old Lace.  My opinion of star Gary Cooper unfortunately is not that high.  He was awful in Love in the Afternoon.  I found him very dull and in Love in the Afternoon, director Billy Wilder would have been better off hiring a mannequin for Cooper's part.  In Mr. Deeds Goes to Town, Cooper wasn't that bad, but I can't figure out WHY he was such a big star.  Maybe he was better in silent films.  Cooper just seems to have no pizzazz.  Perhaps if they had cast James Stewart or maybe even Cary Grant, it might have been more interesting.  I wanted to say Errol Flynn, but he might have had too much flair for the part of Longfellow Deeds.  I hate to say it, but I liked Adam Sandler and Winona Ryder's remake better! But I did love Jean Arthur in this film.  She never gives a bad performance in my opinion.

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I hate to say it, but I liked Adam Sandler and Winona Ryder's remake better! 

 

Whatever you think of Gary Cooper the original version of Mr Deeds is vastly superior to the remake, if only because Adam Sandler is not in it.

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This thread is intended for people to share their thoughts on films that they recently saw.  I also made a counter thread "A Waste of Space on the DVR" for those films that were total duds.  This is not limited to films seen on TCM.

 

I just watched a few films:

 

Wabash Avenue.  I just saw this film with Betty Grable and Victor Mature.  I remember last summer, Dargo tried to get me to like Mature more.  While I did like him in I Wake Up Screaming, I can never see him as the supposed heartthrob that he was supposed to be.  Mature does absolutely nothing for me--lookswise.  I do like him as smarmy characters.  He seems to do smarmy well.  Betty Grable was beautiful as always and wore many costumes to show off her great legs.  This film was entertaining when I watched it, but is ultimately forgettable. 

 

 

Many thanks for this Speedracer.  I still have yet  to see Wabash Avenue.

 

I'm a fan of Victor Mature.  I guess I warmed up to him from the opposite end of his acting career where he was poking fun at himself in After the Fox and Head.  Now, I think he's great in everything even if it is a bit cheesy.

 

And you got to love someone who said, "I'm no actor, and I've got 64 pictures to prove it."

- courtesy of the imdb

 

May this thread live long and prosper!

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I watched an episode of the 1963 documentary TV series Hollywood and The Stars, hosted by Joseph Cotton -- perhaps some here will remember it. The episode was titled "The Funny Men", and was a tribute to Hollywood comedians.

 

It was mostly unsurprising but not badly done considering the date. I would not rate it as highly as the contemporary compilation films of Robert Youngson (The Golden Age Of Comedy, When Comedy Was King). It showed public domain silent footage of Chaplin, Keaton, Langdon, and various other silent clowns, paying speciall attention to Mack Sennett. 

 

If Hal Roach was mentioned I missed it, and I don't think there was even a still photo of Laurel & Hardy. I guess producer David Wolper was taking no chances with usage rights. The Harold Lloyd footage was of the building climb -- but from Feet First instead of Safety Last. Cotton also mentioned Lloyd's two compilation films. This may have have been Lloyd's price for permitting use of the footage.

 

There were a few clips from PD talkies, such as the Sennett Fields shorts, as well as newsreel footage of sound stars such as Bob Hope and Martin & Lewis. Obviously there were rights problems for the sound era.

 

There were a couple of intriguing things: This may have been the first time the City Lights rehearsal-on-camera footage was ever seen publicly (you can see some in the much later Unknown Chaplin series), and if I'm not mistaken the man in a short clip from an early Fred Allen short was none other than an unrecognizable, unmustachioed Clifton Webb. Straight man, indeed.

 

There was one great moment when Joseph Cotton appears on camera to deliver an erudite, scholarly dissertation on Freud's analysis of humor -- and receives a pie in the face.

 

:lol:

 

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OMG, Richard. Back in the day, as a 13 year-old, I loved that show so much. I remember my heart being broken by its cancellation after a single season.

 

One thing I never forgot was how Elmer Bernstein's theme would soar, right after Joseph Cotten's opening introductory remarks that would always finish with "on Hollywood and the Stars". I've been humming that theme for half a century.

 

Here it is:

 

 

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I just watched Nadine, with Kim Basinger, Jeff Bridges and Rip Torn.  I'd recorded it a few nights ago and was catching up.  It centers on an about-to-be divorced couple (Basinger and Bridges) in the Austin of 1954,  who get thrown back together when Basinger accidentally comes into possession of the state's secret  plans for a new highway.  Bridges steals the plans from her and figures on using the information to get rich, until the arch-hustler criminal Torn gets other ideas.  It's a classic mix of romantic comedy and caper movie, with a pair of thugs working for Torn who might be straight out of Home Alone.  It's not as if the plot is all that thrilling, and in truth if it had been shot in black and white and were 50 years older, it wouldn't stand out from some of Jimmy Cagney's potboilers from the 30's.  But the three main actors are all terrific (especially Basinger), and we even get a brief cameo appearance by George Costanza's father (Jerry Stiller), who winds up in a way that George Costanza might have dreamed about.

 

 

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OMG, Richard. Back in the day, as a 13 year-old, I loved that show so much. I remember my heart being broken by its cancellation after a single season.

 

One thing I never forgot was how Elmer Bernstein's theme would soar, right after Joseph Cotten's opening introductory remarks that would always finish with "on Hollywood and the Stars". I've been humming that theme for half a century.

 

Here it is:

 

 

It's curious how information can be stored in our brains for decades, and we don't even know it's there, and then, suddenly, instant recall. I had a conversation with someone who made reference to the music of Hollywood and the Stars and , suddenly, that wonderful theme came back to me, without even hearing it again. (It was also a terrific series, by the way).

 

Thanks for the link.

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Speed, if you've pais any attention to these forums, you'd have caught my mentioning many times that my MOM was a Victor Mature groupie!  (LOL)

 

I liked him, too.  Not onlyout of respect for Mom, but he seemed to do OK in most of his film roles, and as a person, didn't take himself too seriously, you know, use his "celebrity" to gain prefereable treatment.

 

My favorite story is his trying to join a country club in Beverly Hills, I think it was(as he was a golf junkie, so to speak), and was told that the club "didn't accept actors" for membership.  Matured argued, "I am NOT an actor.  And I've got 30 pictures under my belt that PROVES it!"

 

Back to business---

 

My wife just came home from a too long stay at the hospital, so I've been a bit busy to watch very many movies.  Looking forward to one or two.  Nothing specific, just SOME kind of diversion!

 

 

Sepiatone

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I recently picked up a fairly inexpensive copy of The Tree of Wooden Clogs, a 1978 Italian film by Ermanno Olmi.

I was all set to record it some months back but as many of you know it was yanked from the TCM schedule before broadcast which lead to a bit of speculation as to why this may have occurred.

I had seen Wooden Clogs about twenty years ago but could remember very little about the film other than it was about very poor Italian peasant farmers at the turn of the century and that 'wooden clogs' somehow figured into the film's plot.

It is one of those films that is seemingly about nothing, but could be about everything.  i didn't find its 3 hour length to be a problem.  It is almost like watching a documentary about peasant life right down to its hand held camera techniques.  It is subtle though.  Not the shakey-cam or vomit-cam stuff you see today.

The cast is entirely made up of non-actors.  Real peasants.  And apparently it was shot using its local dialect, Bergamasque which then had to be dubbed into Italian for the Italian market.  Olmi explains in the dvd extras that all of the non-actors did their own dubbing which I have to say is quite a technical accomplishment for amateurs.

I believe the earlier discussion of this film was mainly about the depiction of violence toward animals.  The film opens with a farmer chopping the head off of a goose.  A little later on the controversial scene depicting the slaughter and butchering of a hog is played out in almost real time.

It is very graphic and quite disturbing.  But just when I thought you would never want your kids to see this, Olmi cuts to two three year-old peasant kids watching the hog die with unbothered fascination.  This is real life on a real farm.

And you can tell that it is done by a proficient butcher and is not a gratuitous add-on for exploitation.  

It is just something that Olmi has selected to include in the film.

I liked the film.  It is very different from the type of films we all normally watch.

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I just watched Nadine, with Kim Basinger, Jeff Bridges and Rip Torn.  I'd recorded it a few nights ago and was catching up.  It centers on an about-to-be divorced couple (Basinger and Bridges) in the Austin of 1954,  who get thrown back together when Basinger accidentally comes into possession of the state's secret  plans for a new highway.  Bridges steals the plans from her and figures on using the information to get rich, until the arch-hustler criminal Torn gets other ideas.  It's a classic mix of romantic comedy and caper movie, with a pair of thugs working for Torn who might be straight out of Home Alone.  It's not as if the plot is all that thrilling, and in truth if it had been shot in black and white and were 50 years older, it wouldn't stand out from some of Jimmy Cagney's potboilers from the 30's.  But the three main actors are all terrific (especially Basinger), and we even get a brief cameo appearance by George Costanza's father (Jerry Stiller), who winds up in a way that George Costanza might have dreamed about.

 

Yes, Kim Basinger is very good in NADINE.

Every time she says "Vernon Hightower" is a hoot. 

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Speed, if you've pais any attention to these forums, you'd have caught my mentioning many times that my MOM was a Victor Mature groupie!  (LOL)

 

I liked him, too.  Not onlyout of respect for Mom, but he seemed to do OK in most of his film roles, and as a person, didn't take himself too seriously, you know, use his "celebrity" to gain prefereable treatment.

 

My favorite story is his trying to join a country club in Beverly Hills, I think it was(as he was a golf junkie, so to speak), and was told that the club "didn't accept actors" for membership.  Matured argued, "I am NOT an actor.  And I've got 30 pictures under my belt that PROVES it!"

 

Back to business---

 

My wife just came home from a too long stay at the hospital, so I've been a bit busy to watch very many movies.  Looking forward to one or two.  Nothing specific, just SOME kind of diversion!

 

 

Sepiatone

Lol.  I'm trying to like Mature more, I just can never figure out why he was a heartthrob... but to each his (or her) own.  I do like his "I'm not an actor" quote.  I always appreciate celebrities who seem to be humble and have a good sense of humor.

 

I hope your wife is feeling better soon :-)

 

Sometimes that's the best thing about movies.  They don't need to be the most profound or revolutionary film.  Sometimes, just a fun movie that entertains is all you need to escape from real life for awhile.

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Yes, Kim Basinger is very good in NADINE.

Every time she says "Vernon Hightower" is a hoot. 

 

Absolutely.  And that Jawja accent of hers can pass for Texas to us outlanders.

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....Sometimes that's the best thing about movies.  They don't need to be the most profound or revolutionary film.  Sometimes, just a fun movie that entertains is all you need to escape from real life for awhile.

 

Sound kind'a like what Joel McCrea says at the end of "Sullivan's Travels" there, Speedy. ;)

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I just watched Nadine, with Kim Basinger, Jeff Bridges and Rip Torn.  I'd recorded it a few nights ago and was catching up.  It centers on an about-to-be divorced couple (Basinger and Bridges) in the Austin of 1954,  who get thrown back together when Basinger accidentally comes into possession of the state's secret  plans for a new highway.  Bridges steals the plans from her and figures on using the information to get rich, until the arch-hustler criminal Torn gets other ideas.  It's a classic mix of romantic comedy and caper movie, with a pair of thugs working for Torn who might be straight out of Home Alone.  It's not as if the plot is all that thrilling, and in truth if it had been shot in black and white and were 50 years older, it wouldn't stand out from some of Jimmy Cagney's potboilers from the 30's.  But the three main actors are all terrific (especially Basinger), and we even get a brief cameo appearance by George Costanza's father (Jerry Stiller), who winds up in a way that George Costanza might have dreamed about.

Lol, it seemed funny that you would identify Jerry Stiller as Georve Costanza's father, instead.of Ben Stiller's.

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This thread is intended for people to share their thoughts on films that they recently saw.  I also made a counter thread "A Waste of Space on the DVR" for those films that were total duds.  This is not limited to films seen on TCM.

 

I just watched a few films:

 

Wabash Avenue.  I just saw this film with Betty Grable and Victor Mature.  I remember last summer, Dargo tried to get me to like Mature more.  While I did like him in I Wake Up Screaming, I can never see him as the supposed heartthrob that he was supposed to be.  Mature does absolutely nothing for me--lookswise.  I do like him as smarmy characters.  He seems to do smarmy well.  Betty Grable was beautiful as always and wore many costumes to show off her great legs.  This film was entertaining when I watched it, but is ultimately forgettable. 

 

The Avengers: Age of Ultron.  This was a great film.  While it was heavy on the CGI, it was a fun film with an interesting plot.   James Spader was great as the voice of the villain, Ultron.  The Avengers themselves were also fun, and I thought it was interesting how the filmmakers worked around Scarlett Johanssen's pregnancy (stunt doubles & CGI).  I also like that the group seems to be evolving and making room for two new Avengers: The Scarlet Witch (played very well by The Olsen Twins' sister, Elizabeth Olsen) and Falcon.  I look forward to the next film and the next superhero film in the Marvel franchise-- Ant-Man starring Paul Rudd and Michael Douglas. 

 

Mr. Deeds Goes to Town.  I recorded this film for Jean Arthur.  I'll have to admit right here that I've seen three Capra films: It Happened One Night, Mr. Smith Goes to Washington and Arsenic and Old Lace.  My opinion of star Gary Cooper unfortunately is not that high.  He was awful in Love in the Afternoon.  I found him very dull and in Love in the Afternoon, director Billy Wilder would have been better off hiring a mannequin for Cooper's part.  In Mr. Deeds Goes to Town, Cooper wasn't that bad, but I can't figure out WHY he was such a big star.  Maybe he was better in silent films.  Cooper just seems to have no pizzazz.  Perhaps if they had cast James Stewart or maybe even Cary Grant, it might have been more interesting.  I wanted to say Errol Flynn, but he might have had too much flair for the part of Longfellow Deeds.  I hate to say it, but I liked Adam Sandler and Winona Ryder's remake better! But I did love Jean Arthur in this film.  She never gives a bad performance in my opinion.

WABASH AVENUE is one of the few instances.where a star.successfully remade.a film,.this being a remake of her 1943 film, CONEY ISLAND; George Montgomery was her costar there. And speaking of Betty's Million Dollar Legs, it was a publicity still for CI thst became the iconic WW2 ****.

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The Prince and the Showgirl.  I tried to watch this film again and it just doesn't do anything for me.  For whatever reason, I keep getting bored during it.  Marilyn Monroe was as charming as usual, but Laurence Olivier leaves me cold.  I find it interesting that on many of Marilyn's films, I will read trivia about how it took her 50 takes or whatever to get a line right and how her co-stars were exasperated by her behavior.  It sounds like on many of her films, she was a nightmare to work with.  However, I always find that she always brings her charm and for lack of a better word, her "Marilyn-ness" to her roles.  I always find her performance to be the highlight of the film... except for perhaps Some Like it Hot, that movie belongs to Jack Lemmon. 

 

I'll See You in My Dreams.  Count me among those who were interested in the Doris Day musicals that aired the other day.  In fact, I DVR'd all of them.  Anyway... I was intrigued by the cast in this one: Doris Day and Danny Thomas? It sounded like an unlikely pairing so I decided to watch that one first. I really liked this film.  Doris Day has such a beautiful voice.  I love how slow and sultry it sounds along with the jazz feel.  Her songs would be the perfect thing to listen to in a dimly lit room while sipping wine (or maybe brandy in a snifter, lol) and relaxing after a tough day.  I liked the pairing of Day and Thomas.  I liked how their relationship was presented realistically with all the highs and lows that normal relationships experience.  This was a great film and much better than I expected it to be.  I liked that this film had comedic and dramatic elements that saved it from just being a run of the mill musical chock full of cheesy, forgettable songs.  There were some very beautiful songs in this film and some others that I recognized from various episodes of I Love Lucy (lol).  I just saw that this film was directed by Michael Curtiz.  Perhaps that's why I liked this movie.  Despite what I've read about Curtiz as a person, there's no denying that he directed some wonderful films. 

 

I've found that I prefer Day in more of her comedy and dramatic roles.  The musicals I've seen her in so far have been on the corny side.  Seeing that I recorded all the ones that aired the other day (except Tea for Two and It's a Great Feeling, which I'd already seen), I should get a pretty good idea on what I think about Doris Day musicals.  At least, if anything, even if the film is lousy, I can count on hearing Day's beautiful singing voice. 

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The Prince and the Showgirl.  I tried to watch this film again and it just doesn't do anything for me.  For whatever reason, I keep getting bored during it.  Marilyn Monroe was as charming as usual, but Laurence Olivier leaves me cold.  I find it interesting that on many of Marilyn's films, I will read trivia about how it took her 50 takes or whatever to get a line right and how her co-stars were exasperated by her behavior.  It sounds like on many of her films, she was a nightmare to work with.  However, I always find that she always brings her charm and for lack of a better word, her "Marilyn-ness" to her roles.  I always find her performance to be the highlight of the film... except for perhaps Some Like it Hot, that movie belongs to Jack Lemmon. 

 

I like THE PRINCE AND THE SHOWGIRL, but it's all because of Marilyn Monroe.

None of her male co-stars in her movies were really able to match her sexiness with the exception of maybe Don Murray in BUS STOP.

.

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I like THE PRINCE AND THE SHOWGIRL, but it's all because of Marilyn Monroe.

None of her male co-stars in her movies were really able to match her sexiness with the exceptopn of maybe Don Murray in BUS STOP.

.

You didn't think Tom Ewell was sexy in Seven Year Itch ?

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Lol, it seemed funny that you would identify Jerry Stiller as Georve Costanza's father, instead.of Ben Stiller's.

 

I think I can guarantee that far more people could pick George Costanza (or Frank Costanza) out of a lineup than Ben Stiller, given the popularity of Seinfeld and the saturation of its reruns ever since the original series went off the air.

 

ben_stiller.jpgfrank-costanza-seinfeld.jpg?w=650&h=400

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None of her male co-stars in her movies were really able to match her sexiness with the exception of maybe Don Murray in BUS STOP.

.

 

They weren't supposed to.

 

That was always the key to why Marilyn was so successful. It was the dream of the average man that she could be available to him. It was played that way time and again - and we loved it. And it helped that she was matrimonially connected to average-looking men in real life - that reinforced her endearment to us.

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I like THE PRINCE AND THE SHOWGIRL, but it's all because of Marilyn Monroe.

None of her male co-stars in her movies were really able to match her sexiness with the exception of maybe Don Murray in BUS STOP.

.

 

Never've caught RIVER OF NO RETURN I guess, eh Holden?!

 

river-of-no-return-1.jpg

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This thread is intended for people to share their thoughts on films that they recently saw.  I also made a counter thread "A Waste of Space on the DVR" for those films that were total duds.  This is not limited to films seen on TCM.

 

...

 

The Avengers: Age of Ultron.  This was a great film. ....  I look forward to the next film and the next superhero film in the Marvel franchise-- Ant-Man starring Paul Rudd and Michael Douglas. ...

 

I love Paul Rudd ! I know I sound like a gushing teenager, and also it's off-topic, but at mention of his name I had to say it. He's ridiculously handsome, and at the same time there's a "silliness" vibe about him, like he doesn't take himself too seriously. He seems like a really nice, fun, guy, and incredibly sexy and attractive to boot.

PaulRudd_Vespa_838300_400.jpg

 

I had trouble picking a photo, but this one demonstrates both his handsomeness and goofy quality.

 

 

 

...Mr. Deeds Goes to Town.  I recorded this film for Jean Arthur.  I'll have to admit right here that I've seen three Capra films: It Happened One Night, Mr. Smith Goes to Washington and Arsenic and Old Lace.  My opinion of star Gary Cooper unfortunately is not that high.  He was awful in Love in the Afternoon.  I found him very dull and in Love in the Afternoon, director Billy Wilder would have been better off hiring a mannequin for Cooper's part.  In Mr. Deeds Goes to Town, Cooper wasn't that bad, but I can't figure out WHY he was such a big star.  Maybe he was better in silent films.  Cooper just seems to have no pizzazz.  Perhaps if they had cast James Stewart or maybe even Cary Grant, it might have been more interesting.  I wanted to say Errol Flynn, but he might have had too much flair for the part of Longfellow Deeds.  I hate to say it, but I liked Adam Sandler and Winona Ryder's remake better! But I did love Jean Arthur in this film.  She never gives a bad performance in my opinion.

 

I don't know how to do that thing where people quote from someone's post, comment, then return to the quote again.

 

Anyway:

 

I know what you mean about Gary Cooper, speedy. I've never been a big fan, although I find him ok in some roles. For instance, I think he's all right in Mr. Deeds, a film which I quite like. I love the way Mr. Deeds decides to use his money to lend to farmers who've gone bankrupt due to the Depression. It's a very "social justice" (what it would be called now) thing to do.

And yeah, Jean Arthur is so likable in this.

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I love Paul Rudd ! I know I sound like a gushing teenager, and also it's off-topic, but at mention of his name I had to say it. He's ridiculously handsome, and at the same time there's a "silliness" vibe about him, like he doesn't take himself too seriously. He seems like a really nice, fun, guy, and incredibly sexy and attractive to boot.

PaulRudd_Vespa_838300_400.jpg

 

I had trouble picking a photo, but this one demonstrates both his handsomeness and goofy quality.

 

Well I didn't see your photo you posted, but I know what you mean about Rudd.  I completely agree.  He is very versatile too.  He can play completely outrageous slob characters like in The 40-year Old Virgin or sleazy personalities in Anchorman, but can play ordinary, but handsome and charming guys like in This is 40 and Knocked Up.  I remember when he started to get more popular, like with his role as Phoebe's husband in the last couple of seasons of Friends and his Judd Apatow films... then I saw Clueless again and realized that he was Alicia Silverstone's ex-step brother Josh.  I always thought he was way cuter than stupid Christian that she was pursuing and now I know why-- It was Paul Rudd! Suffice it to say, I'm very happy that his career took off and we can look forward to many Paul Rudd films in the future. 

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I know what you mean about Gary Copper, speedy. I've never been a big fan, although I find him ok in some roles. For instance, I think he's all right in Mr. Deeds, a film which I quite like. I love the way Mr. Deeds decides to use his money to lend to farmers who've gone bankrupt due to the Depression. It's a very "social justice" (what it would be called now) thing to do.

And yeah, Jean Arthur is so likable in this.

 

I found Gary Cooper more bearable in 'Mr. Deeds' than I found him in that terrible Love in the Afternoon.  In Mr. Deeds, I can see why he was a heartthrob, he wouldn't be someone I'd swoon over, but I can see it.  I also did like how he was giving his money to the farmers, that was very admirable.  I didn't find him to be that bad in Ball of Fire either.  It seems he fares better if he's paired with a more interesting leading lady-- except for in the case of Love in the Afternoon, even Audrey Hepburn couldn't make it more interesting.  They could have cast a mannequin in Cooper's part and it would have been better. 

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The Prince and the Showgirl.  I tried to watch this film again and it just doesn't do anything for me.  For whatever reason, I keep getting bored during it.  Marilyn Monroe was as charming as usual, but Laurence Olivier leaves me cold.  

 

There's absolutely no chemistry between Olivier and Monroe in The Prince and the Showgirl. That's part of the problem. TPATS feels like one of those "concept" movies, where someone went "Hey, I've got a great idea - what about we pair up Marilyn Monroe and Laurence Olivier,  We mix in some snobbery, class politics, and a political conspiracy...it'll work, trust me..."

 

 

 

...I've found that I prefer Day in more of her comedy and dramatic roles.  The musicals I've seen her in so far have been on the corny side.  Seeing that I recorded all the ones that aired the other day (except Tea for Two and It's a Great Feeling, which I'd already seen), I should get a pretty good idea on what I think about Doris Day musicals.  At least, if anything, even if the film is lousy, I can count on hearing Day's beautiful singing voice. 

 

I was disappointed that on that Doris Day day (hey, day X 2), they didn't air one of Doris' best, The Pajama Game. This is a wonderful and mysteriously unknown musical starring Doris and John Raitt (more known for stage and television than movies.)

 

It's full of great songs, incredible dance numbers (like "This is My Once a Year Day"), and fun characters. I love it, it's my favourite DD movie.

I guess TCM doesn't have the rights to it or something, because they never air it. Too bad.

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