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I Just Watched...

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"The Last Voyage" (1960)--Wild disaster movie that starts the action before the opening credits have finished.  Stars Robert Stack, Dorothy Malone, George Sanders as the deluded Captain,  and Woody Strode.  

 

Films' plot: The Claridon is set to be scrapped after 5 more trips.  A fire breaks out and spreads, causing multiple explosions, affecting passengers in various ways.

 

Robert Stack is suitably heroic as the harassed father.  Dorothy Malone is convincingly distraught as his wife.  As their daughter, Tammy Marihugh is convincingly panicked (it looks like she did her own stunts).  George Sanders and Woody Strode take what acting honors are to be had; they're the only actors who have a chance to develop a characterization

 

TLV was nominated for a Best Special Effects Oscar.

 

TCM has a good article on the film.  Damn good film--8/10.

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"The Last Voyage" (1960)--Wild disaster movie that starts the action before the opening credits have finished.  Stars Robert Stack, Dorothy Malone, George Sanders as the deluded Captain,  and Woody Strode.  

 

this one disappoints me every time i see it. it has a lot of strengths, but enough minuses that it's frustrating because it could be a lot better than it is.

 

favorite line: "C'mon fellas! Put some BEEF INTO IT!"

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No, I haven't` seen HOUSE OF STRANGERS. I wonder if the film is available on YOU TUBE?

I checked on YOU TUBE, and HOUSE OF STRANGERS is available.DEATH OF A SALESMAN 1951 is also on the channel.

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"Three In The Attic" (1968)--With Christopher Jones and Yvette Mimieux.  Jones is dating three girls--each thinks she's the only girl in his life.  The three girls find out and take a unique revenge.

 

All characters are unsympathetic, with the possible exception of Mimieux.  Jones questions one of the frat rats (yes, they're rats, IMHO) if he's losing his "moral fiber": it's clear he had none to begin with.  

 

Film makes a half-hearted attempt to finish like a screwball comedy; it doesn't work, IMO.

 

One of the oddest and dislikeable films I've seen.  TCM is showing this at 3:15 a.m. E.S.T. May 19th--I will easily skip it. 1/4--for the eye candy.

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"Three In The Attic" (1968)--With Christopher Jones and Yvette Mimieux.  Jones is dating three girls--each thinks she's the only girl in his life.  The three girls find out and take a unique revenge.

 

He was the new James Dean.

 

But he lost his career to depression. He made 'Ryan's Daughter' in 1970 and that was it until Larry Bishop brought him out of retirement some 25 years later for one more film.

 

Such a shame, really. He had the look.

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City on Fire (1979) - 3/10 - Atrocious Canadian disaster film with several well-known embarrassed cast members. A disgruntled refinery worker sets the stage for an unnamed city to go up in flames. Barry Newman gets top billing as a doctor, with Susan Clark, Leslie Nielsen, Shelley Winters, James Franciscus, Richard Donat, Donald Pilon, Ava Gardner as a TV host, and Henry Fonda as the Fire Chief. The script is bad, the acting is bad (even from the veterans), and the effects are worse. I watched the MST3K version, so that made it a little more bearable. 

 

 

First time watched.      Source: YT.

 

From what I heard several of the superstars were quite juiced throughout the production.

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"The Bat Whispers" (1930)--Slow moving mystery has German Expressionist inspired visuals, some knockout photographic work and sets, and comedy routines by Maude Ebourne as the Owner of the Mansion, and whoever played the sniveling maid to recommend it.  Films' villain is obvious by the middle of the film, if not earlier.

 

 This was one of Una Merkels' first films; the microphone very clearly catches her Southern accent (Kentucky or Tennessee).

 

Maude Ebourne is a delight for most of the film.  

 

Maid: "I'm skeeereddd!  Ebourne: You haven't Got a Brain!  Shut up!"

 

Film was thought enough of a mystery that a plea to keep the ending secret was added to the end of the film.  Just a bit better than Maltins' rating.  2/4.

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i caught the last 30 mins or so of THE BAT WHISPERS- enough to know it's not that great- one of those films where they were still "finding their way" in the early days of sound- which overall has a rather "tinny" quality to it and does the actors no favors.

 

agree about the production design being good, that screwy ending was certainly memorable- i will at least give it that.

 

I wish someone- somewhere- had at some point taken Chester Morris aside and asked him to stop insisting on doing the Barthelmess-jaw clinch thing in profile, he does it in everything, all the time- and it starts to looks ridiculous.

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"THE TRAIN ROBBERS" - Burt Kennedy - 1973

 

This film seems to have fallen into oblivion.

 

But it is less a Western "actioner" than an intimate look at men - and one woman - in a highly stressed situation.

 

The screenplay is first-rate in terms of character delineation - and the actors were obviously having a good time.

 

John Wayne was obviously "aging" by this time - and much heavier, too - but the man could still dominate a film.

 

The film's most expected moment - Ben Johnson thinks that Rod Taylor might think that Ben is interested in Rod - so Ben feels compelled to inform Rod that he, Ben, is not "sweet".

 

The film has a highly unexpected twist ending.

 

Which is a comment, I guess, on how easily men are duped by pretty women.

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"THE TRAIN ROBBERS" - Burt Kennedy - 1973

 

This film seems to have fallen into oblivion.

 

But it is less a Western "actioner" than an intimate look at men - and one woman - in a highly stressed situation.

 

The screenplay is first-rate in terms of character delineation - and the actors were obviously having a good time.

 

John Wayne was obviously "aging" by this time - and much heavier, too - but the man could still dominate a film.

 

The film's most expected moment - Ben Johnson thinks that Rod Taylor might think that Ben is interested in Rod - so Ben feels compelled to inform Rod that he, Ben, is not "sweet".

 

The film has a highly unexpected twist ending.

 

Which is a comment, I guess, on how easily men are duped by pretty women.

The woman, for those people who don't know the film, is played by Ann-Margaret.

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"The Bat Whispers" (1930)--Slow moving mystery has German Expressionist inspired visuals, some knockout photographic work and sets, and comedy routines by Maude Ebourne as the Owner of the Mansion, and whoever played the sniveling maid to recommend it.  Films' villain is obvious by the middle of the film, if not earlier.

 

 This was one of Una Merkels' first films; the microphone very clearly catches her Southern accent (Kentucky or Tennessee).

 

Maude Ebourne is a delight for most of the film.  

 

Maid: "I'm skeeereddd!  Ebourne: You haven't Got a Brain!  Shut up!"

 

Film was thought enough of a mystery that a plea to keep the ending secret was added to the end of the film.  Just a bit better than Maltins' rating.  2/4.

The remake starring Vincent Price and Agnes Moorehead doesn't attempt to pretend that it is not campy.  It's very funny. 

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The woman, for those people who don't know the film, is played by Ann-Margaret.

And Ann-Margaret seemed all wrong for the role of the grieving widow, too, until that unexpected twist ending, which embraces her casting as "spot-on".

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North and South, Book II (1986) - 7/10 - TV mini-series based on books by John Jakes. While the first mini-series focused on the lead-up to the Civil War, this sequel concentrates on the war itself. Featuring many battle re-enactments, from Antietam to Gettysburg, all of the characters return, with a handful of new ones. Patrick Swayze and James Read are still the ostensible leads, but there's so many characters and plotlines that there really isn't any star.

 

Also with Kirstie Alley, Lewis Smith, Terri Garber, Genie Francis, Jonathan Frakes, Parker Stevenson, Forest Whitaker, Mary Crosby, Philip Casnoff, David Ogden Stiers, Morgan Fairchild, David Carradine, Lesley Anne-Down, Lee Horsley, Jim Metzler, Robert Englund, Gary Grubbs, Bonnie Bartlett, Michael Dudikoff, Inga Swenson, Whip Hubley, Kurtwood Smith, Bryan Cranston, Linda Evans, Harry Northup, Billy Drago, Leon Rippy, and Nancy Marchand. A few historical figures are portrayed, such as Hal Holbrook (under heavy make-up) as Abraham Lincoln, William Schallert (R.I.P.) as Robert E. Lee, Anthony Zerbe as Ulysses S. Grant, Lloyd Bridges as Jefferson Davis, and Clu Gulager as Gen. Philip Sheridan. Wayne Newton is surprisingly effective as a sadistic prison warden, Jean Simmons is given much more to do this time around, and Olivia De Havilland has a scene or two as a battlefield nurse. James Stewart, as a lawyer, makes his final on-screen appearance.

 

This is quality TV fare, although it resembles Dynasty or Dallas more than a serious historical presentation. And again, at a 9+ hour running time, it's quite an undertaking. Followed 8 years later by another sequel mini-series.

 

First time watched.      Source: DVD.

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Cries and Whispers (1972). If you're sick of the current trend of having movies use a mostly teal color palette with orange for the explosions, then this is the movie for you. Ingmar Bergman and his inematographer Sven Nykvist use a palette of red, red, red, red, and red as a backdrop for their story of three sisters in circa-1900 Sweden. Agnes (Harriet Andersson) is dying of cancer, and her two sisters Karin (Ingrid Thulin) and Maria (Liv Ullmann) come to comfort her in her final days. Not that they're much comfort, since the whole family is dysfunctional for reasons that are never clearly delineated. And they all have bizarre sexual hangups.

 

I'm sure I'll be in the minority, but I found that when it comes to dysfunctional families, this movie pales in comparison to Bergman's later Autumn Sonata. There, the characters are real people and it's easy to identify with them. Here, they seem like little more than ciphers standing in for basic human emotions. It doesn't help that the film is grindingly tedious when it isn't being gratuitously creepy (in the creepy old uncle way, not in the horror movie way). What was the point of the "dream" sequence toward the end, anyway?

 

5/10 for the story, 9/10 for the cinematography, which won Nykvist an Oscar -- it's not just the overwhelming use of red that makes the cinematography interesting.

 

Cries and Whispers was a thoroughly horrid movie-watching experience from beginning to end. I would call it "harrowing".  And I usually like Ingmar Bergman.

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I watched Dear Brigitte as it aired on TCM tonight as I want to see everything that James Stewart was in at least once.

 

This is the movie in tonight's lineup of movies about meeting someone famous that interested me the most among titles I had not seen before.  It was on in the background as I did things.  It was enjoyable, but I probably won't watch it a second time.

 

I prefer Bill Mumy in The Twilight Zone and Lost in Space.

 

I am not a big fan of these movies, so I will be recording the 7pm film with Bogart and Bacall which is also new to me, because I don't want to watch two of them in a row.  That film is called Two Guys from Milwaukee. 

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"Master of the World" (1961)--Based on two Jules Verne novels, film stars Vincent Price, Charles Bronson, and Henry Hull.  First three minutes of film are in black and white--Then it switches to color.

 

Film is set in 1800's Pennsylvania and is about Robur (Price), his plans for demilitarizing the World, and how Strock (Bronson) and Prudent (Hull), an arms manufacturer run afoul of Robur.

 

Price is dependably good, as always: Bronson is good, in a mid-career role.  Henry Hull gives the Worst performance I've ever seen him give.  He  yells and bellows his way through the role until  I was Wishing that someone would duct tape his mouth shut, or at Least tell him to stuff a sock in it.  Hull makes the rest of the actors look like Olivier.

 

Special Effects vary from OK to amusingly fake.

 

Film is a fable about bringing about world-wide peace, and is very obviously a product of the Camelot Era. Listen to Prices' narration at the end and the quote from Verne.  Even with Hull, 2 & 1/2/4.  Film airs 4:15 E.S.T. Thurs. night--is very worth watching or recording.

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I watched Dear Brigitte as it aired on TCM tonight as I want to see everything that James Stewart was in at least once.

 

This is the movie in tonight's lineup of movies about meeting someone famous that interested me the most among titles I had not seen before.  It was on in the background as I did things.  It was enjoyable, but I probably won't watch it a second time.

 

I prefer Bill Mumy in The Twilight Zone and Lost in Space.

 

I am not a big fan of these movies, so I will be recording the 7pm film with Bogart and Bacall which is also new to me, because I don't want to watch two of them in a row.  That film is called Two Guys from Milwaukee. 

I really enjoyed the film, which is essentially a fun entertainment.

 

I thought that Billy Mumy stole the show.

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I really enjoyed the film, which is essentially a fun entertainment.

 

I thought that Billy Mumy stole the show.

Yes, he did.  I really enjoy Bill Mumy.  He has these great commercials on MeTV referencing him as a child actor.

 

There is the one where he talks to himself on the Twilight Zone:

 Young Mumy: You're a very Bad Man!

Current Mumy: And you're a very bad boy!

 

 

 

Then there is the one that currently/still airs about Lost in Space and the computer that lists the Saturday Night Sci-Fi lineup.

 

Too funny.

 

Bill Mumy got my attention much more than Fabian did.

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One Crazy Summer (1986) - 7/10 - Funny, quirky comedy that marks the reteaming of writer-director Savage Steve Holland and star John Cusack after their earlier collaboration Better Off Dead. Cusack plays a high school grad who has an uncertain future, although he wants to be a cartoonist (there are several cartoon sequences scattered throughout). His friend George Calamari (Joel Murray) invites him to spend the summer with him in Nantucket, where they get involved in various town squabbles between a ruthless real estate developer (Mark Metcalfe), his bully son (Matt Mulhern), and a young would-be singer (Demi Moore) who owns a house that they want. Also featuring Bobcat Goldthwait, Tom Villard, Curtis Armstrong, William Hickey, John Matuszak, Rich Hall, Taylor Negron, Jeremy Piven, and Joe Flaherty. Enjoyably weird 80's comedy.

 

 

Rewatch.    Source: DVD.

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"Master of the World" (1961)[...]Henry Hull gives the Worst performance I've ever seen him give.[...]

 

That was the first movie I ever saw Henry Hull in. I became an instant fan- thought he was hilarious. I don't even think I watched the whole movie, but it was enough. Hah.

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"Tremors 5 - Bloodlines" (2015), the Directv program guide description got me interested because of the creatures funny name. LM blasted AO!

 

A bit dumb but enjoyable, could use a better script.  Think this movie was thought up of between a teenager and Gallager.

 

Tremors-5-Bloodlines-2015-cover.jpg

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Yes, he did.  I really enjoy Bill Mumy.  He has these great commercials on MeTV referencing him as a child actor.

 

There is the one where he talks to himself on the Twilight Zone:

 Young Mumy: You're a very Bad Man!

Current Mumy: And you're a very bad boy!

 

 

 

Then there is the one that currently/still airs about Lost in Space and the computer that lists the Saturday Night Sci-Fi lineup.

 

Too funny.

 

Bill Mumy got my attention much more than Fabian did.

Billy Mumy was really A STAR.

 

I have never forgotten him in "Dear Brigitte" or in that "Twilight Zone" episode in which he terrified everybody, including his parents and neighbors.

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Just finished watching the rest of Season 1 of The Twilight Zone after a brief hiatus. I am now 8 episodes into Season 2... The great thing about shows like this, is that each episode is only about 25 mins long, so it's easier to sit down and watch more than one in one sitting (unlike Agatha Christie's Poirot and Miss Marple and Downton Abbey, which are about 45 mins or longer per episode)

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Tall in the Saddle (1944) starring The Duke, Ella Raines, George "Gabby" Hayes... First time watching this one; I checked it out at the library on a whim (probably because I haven't seen a ton of John Wayne's films). Overall, it was pretty enjoyable. I usually am not a huge fan of old westerns, but I liked this one, I think because Hayes is an "ornery old cuss" who doesn't put up with this snob of an East Coast woman in the film.

 

amazone-aux-yeux-verts-07-g.jpg

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Just finished watching the rest of Season 1 of The Twilight Zone after a brief hiatus. I am now 8 episodes into Season 2... The great thing about shows like this, is that each episode is only about 25 mins long, so it's easier to sit down and watch more than one in one sitting (unlike Agatha Christie's Poirot and Miss Marple and Downton Abbey, which are about 45 mins or longer per episode)

 

Funny - I was watching this same show last night.  :)  My very favorite series!

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