speedracer5

I Just Watched...

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Just watched La Bête Humaine (1938) again tonight, compared to American remake Human Desire the two films are quite different. 

 

<spoilers>

 

The murder of Grandmorin the railroad executive occurs practically at the beginning of the film, it happens soon after Roubaud, who sent Séverine, his wife, to ask Grandmorin to smooth things over with the complaining customer, finds out that she was his mistress beginning at the age of sixteen. After the murder Séverine tells Roubard that she does not love him anymore, but Roubard is now a changed man, he doesn't seem care anymore what Séverine does, and spends his nights gambling.

 

Jacques Lantier, the engineer is indeed a bit of a nut case, he loves his engine, I guess it's always there for him. The times he gets involved with women the family "sickness" unpredictably takes over, or maybe it's just a finely tuned instinctive reaction to women in general (just kidding).

 

When Jacques meets Séverine it is in the corridor just after Roubard has killed Grandmorin. She goes to talk with Jacques who becomes smitten with her, and later at the inquiry, tells the cops that he saw no one on the corridor. One thing leads to another and they eventually become lovers and Séverine tells him that she won't be free of Roubard until he's dead. The film is a bit unclear (at least to me and from reading the subtitles) whether Séverine has been cheating on Roubard all along, there is one sequence where a man comes to the door bringing lace from "his wife" for Séverine, which gets Roubard all bent out of shape, then later at the railroad ball this same man is dancing with Séverine. So is she or isn't she?

 

Jacques makes the first attempt to kill Roubard with a lead pipe but finds that he can't do it. Séverine tells him that she can't go on as they are and that it is over. 

 

At a railroad ball Jacques is watching Séverine dance with another man. Out of jealousy Jacques rekindles the romance with Séverine and tells her that he will kill Roubard this time, tonight. He and Séverine go back to her apartment and wait for Roubard. Jacques with Roubard's own gun with kill him and make it look like a suicide but just as they prepare for Roubard to walk in the door (it turns out to be a neighbor) the tension triggers Jacques' sickness to return and he in turn attacks Séverine first by choking her, and then stabbing her with a knife. The sequence is intercut with shots of a crooner at the ball singing about this  coquettish Ninette and shots of the lifeless body off Severine. 

 

Distraught Jacques walks the tracks all night, getting back to work with two minutes to spare. He tells his best friend, the fireman of the locomotive what he did. Later at top speed going down the tracks he jumps off the engine breaking his neck.

 

Of course Human Desire has the "Happy Hollywood" ending with Glen Ford going out with the good girl.

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I just watched "The Long Night" (1947) with Henry Fonda, Barbara Bel Geddes, Vincent Price and Ann Dvorak. It's the first time I saw this multi-layered film.

 

This was not the Henry Fonda of "The Grapes of Wrath" or similar Everyman kind of roles that he usually plays. Instead, he was an orphaned, WWII vet, disillusioned with the world and seeking something more out of life than just his job in a post-war plant.

 

The structure of the movie was very modern. First, we see the murder that is the climax of the film and then we get flashbacks within flashbacks as the story unfolds.

 

To me it was a deeply felt portrait of Americans in the post-War era--seeking connection, friendship, love, stability after the world had been blown to pieces.

 

It's one of the best Fonda performances I've ever seen. It was also a really interesting non-horror part for Vincent Price. He played a sadistic, boastful and lying magician trying to seduce the innocent Bel Geddes. 

 

Dvorak was also excellent in a small part as the jaded magician's assistant. The scene where she lays back in bed and laughs and laughs at Fonda and his dreams of finally finding love and connection with Bel Geddes is chilling.

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Marcar, I am so glad that you enjoyed The Long Night. It is indeed a multi-layered film with complex characters. This is one of my favorite Henry Fonda performances.

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IT'S BREAKING MY (shriveled black) HEART THAT THE SOUND SYNC ON MY TV IS SO MESSED UP!

 

9 times out of 10, the sounds goes out of sync watching live tv every 3-5 minutes and it is EXHAUSTING.

 

I missed BLUES IN THE NIGHT, I missed THE LONG NIGHT, I missed MOTERREY POP and I missed GOOD MORNING MISS DOVE because the feed lags and the sound keeps going and it gets out of sync and the only way to fix it is to TURN OFF THE TV AND TURN IT BACK ON AND WAIT 15 seconds FOR "SPECTRUM CABLE TO ACTIVATE MY CABLE EXPERIENCE" THEN CHANGE THE CHANNEL AND and then rinse, lather and repeat 14 more times over the next hour.

 

it is exhausting.

 

i am so sorry, you guys, but if it's not available ON DEMAND, it's getting where I just cannot watch it.

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IT'S BREAKING MY (shriveled black) HEART THAT THE SOUND SYNC ON MY TV IS SO MESSED UP!

 

9 times out of 10, the sounds goes out of sync watching live tv every 3-5 minutes and it is EXHAUSTING.

 

I missed BLUES IN THE NIGHT, I missed THE LONG NIGHT, I missed MOTERREY POP and I missed GOOD MORNING MISS DOVE because the feed lags and the sound keeps going and it gets out of sync and the only way to fix it is to TURN OFF THE TV AND TURN IT BACK ON AND WAIT 15 seconds FOR "SPECTRUM CABLE TO ACTIVATE MY CABLE EXPERIENCE" THEN CHANGE THE CHANNEL AND and then rinse, lather and repeat 14 more times over the next hour.

 

it is exhausting.

 

i am so sorry, you guys, but if it's not available ON DEMAND, it's getting where I just cannot watch it.

 

Whoa - time to pick up your bra strap and find another TV service if one is available.  That is a bummer; good luck getting it fixed.

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IT'S BREAKING MY (shriveled black) HEART THAT THE SOUND SYNC ON MY TV IS SO MESSED UP!

 

9 times out of 10, the sounds goes out of sync watching live tv every 3-5 minutes and it is EXHAUSTING.

 

I missed BLUES IN THE NIGHT, I missed THE LONG NIGHT, I missed MOTERREY POP and I missed GOOD MORNING MISS DOVE because the feed lags and the sound keeps going and it gets out of sync and the only way to fix it is to TURN OFF THE TV AND TURN IT BACK ON AND WAIT 15 seconds FOR "SPECTRUM CABLE TO ACTIVATE MY CABLE EXPERIENCE" THEN CHANGE THE CHANNEL AND and then rinse, lather and repeat 14 more times over the next hour.

 

it is exhausting.

 

i am so sorry, you guys, but if it's not available ON DEMAND, it's getting where I just cannot watch it.

I actually have more problems with on demand than with regular streaming.

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Whoa - time to pick up your bra strap and find another TV service if one is available..

 

1. I love you for that

2. There isn't....

 

However, I may as well use this chance to segue into my review for BLITHE SPIRIT- which I was able to catch onTCM LIVE today, with no glitches at all(!)

 

Go figure.

 

This is a film I have tried to watch many times before on YouTube and always quit ca. 20ish minutes in. It was about 40 minutes into the story when I came home from work, and I was completely attentive to the end, and laughed out loud countless times, soes I guess this goes down as one case where a disjointed viewing actually improved my opinion of a film.

 

It really was a completely delightful film, with some lovely cinematography. A spry Margaret Rutherford- about 120 pounds lighter than when she was Miss Marple – steals the show with a supporting role as a daffy medium, but really the three leads are every bit as good as she. It's like watching four Rolls-Royce engines revving up in unison throughout.

 

I think this is my first time seeing young Rex Harrison in color, and oh my God he was HOT!!!! Pure charisma through and through

 

I get the feeling they probably relished using advanced special-effects and lighting and make up and opening the venue of the setting up a bit in doing this movie adaptation of the stage play, and it shows. There were some interesting visuals throughout and the cinematography was gorgeous.

 

**No spoilers, but I have to say I did not care for the ending. I don't know if it ends the same way as the stage play, but I think it could've used some brainstorming about a different way to go about ending it...

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I actually have more problems with on demand than with regular streaming.

That's crazy, because I hardly ever have technical problems with TCM ON DEMAND...The problem I nearly always have is that of the 6 to 10 movies inrotation, about 90% of them are films that I HAVE NO DESIRE TO SEE ( i.e. SEX AND THE SINGLE GIRL and ALL THE GD BEACH PARTY MOVIES)

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That's crazy, because I hardly ever have technical problems with TCM ON DEMAND...The problem I nearly always have is that of the 6 to 10 movies inrotation, about 90% of them are films that I HAVE NO DESIRE TO SEE ( i.e. SEX AND THE SINGLE GIRL and ALL THE GD BEACH PARTY MOVIES)

Well I agree with that too, On Demand over Roku seems to stall out once or twice every 2-3 films.

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Sudden Fear (1952)

 

I loved this movie.  At the urging of some of my friends here on the board, I recorded this film last December when it was a TCM premiere.  It's been 9 months, but I've finally watched it.  I should have watched it sooner because this was a great film--probably one of the best films I've watched in awhile.

 

I'm not the biggest fan of Joan Crawford's MGM years, but I love her work in the 1940s-1950s when she was with Warner Brothers and then later freelance (?).  Sudden Fear was an RKO production.  I thought the whole cast was excellent and I liked how the story was told.  While the idea of a husband teaming up with his mistress to kill his wife is not novel, I felt that the way that the events unfolded in Sudden Fear was very creative and interesting.  I also liked that Crawford was a strong character in this film and didn't just wait around being scared.

 

In a nutshell, without giving too much away, Sudden Fear tells the story of a woman (Crawford) who discovers that her husband and his girlfriend are planning on murdering her in order to claim rights to her wealthy estate.  Crawford's character is a wealthy woman who is also a playwright.  When the film opens, she is in New York watching rehearsals for her new play.  The leading man Jack Palance, is good but Crawford doesn't think he's right for the lead in her play and has him fired.  Palance is understandably upset.  Later, Crawford is on a train headed back to her home in San Francisco.  She ends up meeting Palance and the two have a whirlwind relationship on the week long train trip.  By the time the pair make it to San Francisco, they are in love and marry soon after.

 

For awhile, it seems that Crawford and Palance are completely enamored with one another and have an ideal relationship.  At a party, Crawford meets Gloria Grahame, the girlfriend of her lawyer (Bruce Bennett)'s friend, Junior (a pre-Mannix Mike Connors).  Grahame seems innocent and sweet enough and Crawford doesn't think much about her.  She soon discovers that husband Palance and Grahame are acquainted with one another and they're scheming to murder her over the weekend.  Of course, they are planning on framing Crawford's death to look like an accident, as the husband would be the first suspect (any avid Forensic Files viewer knows that).  

 

Palance and Grahame do not know that Crawford knows about their plan.  Crawford does everything she can to foil their plans.  There is also a deadline that the pair is working against, as Crawford is planning on signing a new Will on Monday (it's I believe, Thursday or something on the day Crawford finds out what is happening) which will greatly reduce the amount of money that Palance would be bequeathed.  

 

The third act of the film when it's Sunday night and Palance and Grahame are desperate is the highlight of the film.  Crawford's meticulous planning and execution of her plan is flawless and very interesting to watch in the film.  The director chooses to only show Crawford's hands and body during the scenes where she is preparing for her plot.  The cinematography during the climactic finale is excellent and very unusual.  There were lots of various angles used, not to mention the great scenery of San Francisco.

 

I really liked Crawford in this film--especially her eyes.  Her eyes were almost their own character in the film.  Crawford's facial expressions conveyed every ounce of fear that she was feeling.  I liked her in the scene where she collapses as her idyllic world has suddenly fallen apart without warning.  Palance was excellent.  I had never seen him in a film where he was young.  He reminded me a lot of Martin Landau.  I also really liked Grahame in this film.  Every time I see her in a film, her screen presence is so unique and she brings so much to all her roles, no matter how small.  I like that Grahame also manages to almost always bring a bit of a sleazy quality to her roles, it works well for noir.  She's even a bit sleazy in It's a Wonderful Life

 

This was a great film and I'd love to watch it again, even though I know how it'll end.  I feel like this is one of those films that you can watch over and over and always get something different out of it.  I was excited to find that it was on DVD/Blu Ray.

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I really don't wish to distract from your summary of  SUDDEN FEAR there, Speed,

 

I've never seen it, but it is one I've always meant to if I was able (but whenever scheduled it would be when I couldn't for some reason).

 

But in your post, you mention BRUCE BENNETT being in it.  It does seem to be his week,doesn't it?  TCM had ANGELS IN THE OUTFIELD the other night, and for two nights in a row, I saw him in TWO successive PERRY MASON reruns!

 

He certainly did  get around in his 100 years, didn't he?

 

 

Sepiatone

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I really don't wish to distract from your summary of SUDDEN FEAR there, Speed,

 

I've never seen it, but it is one I've always meant to if I was able (but whenever scheduled it would be when I couldn't for some reason).

 

But in your post, you mention BRUCE BENNETT being in it. It does seem to be his week,doesn't it? TCM had ANGELS IN THE OUTFIELD the other night, and for two nights in a row, I saw him in TWO successive PERRY MASON reruns!

 

He certainly did get around in his 100 years, didn't he?

 

 

Sepiatone

And...

TREASURE OF THE SIERRA MADRE is on tonight, I think.

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LHF reviewed BLITHE SPIRIT: **No spoilers, but I have to say I did not care for the ending. I don't know if it ends the same way as the stage play, but I think it could've used some brainstorming about a different way to go about ending it... 

 

I caught this at MrTiki's yesterday and was sucked in, one of my favorite movies. When it ended, I said, "Just like TOPPER" and then saw TOPPER was next being shown on TCM. A day of spiritualism fun.

 

Would you have liked the story better if it ended when wife #2 left? I thought that would make it end with a big laugh.

 

But then you miss all the extra Rutherford scenes at the end, which I just loved. As someone very interested in spiritualism, I found her scenes to be just hilarious.

This movie was my first introduction to Rutherford and I so loved her I recorded a few titles on her SUTS day. (still haven't watched them)

 

The film looked gorgeous, even better than I remembered. I saw at the end it was a restoration funded by the David Lean Foundation-BRAVO! The colors, the lighting were spectacular and added much to the narrative! Very creative lighting, especially for the ghosts.

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And...

TREASURE OF THE SIERRA MADRE is on tonight, I think.

OY!  I'll check my "on screen" guide a bit later.  But if it IS scheduled, then I guess it really IS Bruce's week, ain't it?  ;)

 

 

and TIKI.  My disappointment is in the fact you reminded my of TOPPER being on yesterday and I had intended on watching it, one of my favorites.  But as it was also my wife's birthday yeasterday, there was a housefull to see her that afternoon and it wasn't possible for me to tune in.  :(

 

 

Sepiatone

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I saw "Blithe Spirit" for the first time on Friday.  I too was chuckling at Margaret Rutherford's performance as Madame Arcati---she was a kick!  I'm still deciding whether or not the ending was satisfying to me.  At first glance, I'd say 'no', but reflecting on how the story unfolded, you could take it two ways and say 'yes, it was a decent ending'.

 

Kay Hammond (wife #1) and Constance Cummings (wife #2) were either so in love with Rex Harrison that they couldn't bear to be without him, even in the afterlife.  Or, they didn't trust him as far as they could throw him, and were thus jealous that he would take on a wife #3 rather than live out his mortal life as a widower.

 

The restoration of this film was very good.  I'd never heard of Constance Cummings until 2016 when she was a Summer Under The Stars honoree.  She had an interesting career; one of the few American-born actors or actresses who went overseas to continue and complete their vocation.

 

Just a note about TCM On Demand.  I fell asleep watching "The Man in the Gray Flannel Suit" the other night, so I thought I'd catch the remainder on the computer the next day.  Everything was cool until the film froze up with 10 minutes to go (Yaaaaarrrrrrggggghhhhh)!  So, I waited until later in the day to try it again.  This time, it ran all the way through with no hitches in the playback.

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Morgan is so appealing that you can put up with most of the nonsense that occurs for most of the film (like his singing in the police glee club).

No he's not. I tried watching this once, and bailing on it 20 minutes or so in when all the horrendous Irish singing started in earnest.

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Sudden Fear (1952)

 

I loved this movie.  At the urging of some of my friends here on the board, I recorded this film last December when it was a TCM premiere.  It's been 9 months, but I've finally watched it.  I should have watched it sooner because this was a great film--probably one of the best films I've watched in awhile.

 

I'm not the biggest fan of Joan Crawford's MGM years, but I love her work in the 1940s-1950s when she was with Warner Brothers and then later freelance (?).  Sudden Fear was an RKO production.  I thought the whole cast was excellent and I liked how the story was told.  While the idea of a husband teaming up with his mistress to kill his wife is not novel, I felt that the way that the events unfolded in Sudden Fear was very creative and interesting.  I also liked that Crawford was a strong character in this film and didn't just wait around being scared.

 

In a nutshell, without giving too much away, Sudden Fear tells the story of a woman (Crawford) who discovers that her husband and his girlfriend are planning on murdering her in order to claim rights to her wealthy estate.  Crawford's character is a wealthy woman who is also a playwright.  When the film opens, she is in New York watching rehearsals for her new play.  The leading man Jack Palance, is good but Crawford doesn't think he's right for the lead in her play and has him fired.  Palance is understandably upset.  Later, Crawford is on a train headed back to her home in San Francisco.  She ends up meeting Palance and the two have a whirlwind relationship on the week long train trip.  By the time the pair make it to San Francisco, they are in love and marry soon after.

 

For awhile, it seems that Crawford and Palance are completely enamored with one another and have an ideal relationship.  At a party, Crawford meets Gloria Grahame, the girlfriend of her lawyer (Bruce Bennett)'s friend, Junior (a pre-Mannix Mike Connors).  Grahame seems innocent and sweet enough and Crawford doesn't think much about her.  She soon discovers that husband Palance and Grahame are acquainted with one another and they're scheming to murder her over the weekend.  Of course, they are planning on framing Crawford's death to look like an accident, as the husband would be the first suspect (any avid Forensic Files viewer knows that).  

 

Palance and Grahame do not know that Crawford knows about their plan.  Crawford does everything she can to foil their plans.  There is also a deadline that the pair is working against, as Crawford is planning on signing a new Will on Monday (it's I believe, Thursday or something on the day Crawford finds out what is happening) which will greatly reduce the amount of money that Palance would be bequeathed.  

 

The third act of the film when it's Sunday night and Palance and Grahame are desperate is the highlight of the film.  Crawford's meticulous planning and execution of her plan is flawless and very interesting to watch in the film.  The director chooses to only show Crawford's hands and body during the scenes where she is preparing for her plot.  The cinematography during the climactic finale is excellent and very unusual.  There were lots of various angles used, not to mention the great scenery of San Francisco.

 

I really liked Crawford in this film--especially her eyes.  Her eyes were almost their own character in the film.  Crawford's facial expressions conveyed every ounce of fear that she was feeling.  I liked her in the scene where she collapses as her idyllic world has suddenly fallen apart without warning.  Palance was excellent.  I had never seen him in a film where he was young.  He reminded me a lot of Martin Landau.  I also really liked Grahame in this film.  Every time I see her in a film, her screen presence is so unique and she brings so much to all her roles, no matter how small.  I like that Grahame also manages to almost always bring a bit of a sleazy quality to her roles, it works well for noir.  She's even a bit sleazy in It's a Wonderful Life

 

This was a great film and I'd love to watch it again, even though I know how it'll end.  I feel like this is one of those films that you can watch over and over and always get something different out of it.  I was excited to find that it was on DVD/Blu Ray.

 
A very, very dark and claustrophobic noir, with good performances all around, especially by the more creepy than usual Palance, it has to be the lighting that is enhancing his train wreck of a face.  
 
It's a veritable juxtaposition of grotesques the ghoulish Palance with the almost buffoonish Crawford.  Crawford no matter how you slice it looks downright clownish (wearing a nightgown inspired by Uncle Fester) while she runs about chewing the scenery with ape like hysterics that makes you feel like throwing her a banana. It's hard to root for a leading lady that looks like this:
 
Joan.jpg
 
Joan%2B01.jpg
 
Palance in one of his better closeups
 
Jack.jpg
 
I can only imagine what Joan's eye bulging school of acting must have looked like on a full 60' screen.
 
Some great noir cinematography ominous convertible
atmo.jpg
 
All in all it has great atmospherics, the Kino DVD is bare bones, too bad, I have a feeling that a running commentary would have been hilarious. I'll subtract 2 points for the post plucked eye browed Crawford, final tally 7/10

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I just watched Walk on Water (2004), a deeply moving Israeli film about a Mossad agent who befriends two young Germans as part of a scheme to locate their Nazi grandfather. The complex characters develop beautifully in this film -- the acting is excellent, particularly Lior Ashkenazi, Knut Berger, and Caroline Peters. Directed by Eytan Fox.

 

The film has one of the great endings. SPOILER ALERT: When the Nazi is finally located, the Mossad agent charged with the execution finds he can no longer kill. The act is carried out by the Nazi's grandson, a sweet, gay young man who loves life. This is a remarkable movie.

 

osVUxR3HdccQG8yBKX3VWp8nVFv.jpg

 

http://www.imdb.com/videoplayer/vi3321561369?ref_=nm_rvd_vi_1

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"Go Naked in the World" (1961)--Starring Gina Lollobrigida, Anthony Franciosa, and Ernest Borgnine. Written and directed by Ranald MacDougall.

 

This one is early 60's MGM melodrama, and full of howlers.

 

As the film begins, Julie (Lollobrigida) gets out of a limousine, accompanied by an older man.  A "sister" on the street, dressed all in red, winks at her.  Message sent to audience.  Julie and companion enter the fancy restaurant.  Her escort has to leave.  Julie sits in a booth.  Nick (Franciosa), who has just finished an enlistment in the Army, catches sight of her.  Despite her brushing him off like a fly, he persists in trying to make a date with her.  They proceed to her place and sleep together as an ending to their first date.  It never dawns on Nick that Julie  is anything other than a "nice" girl, despite numerous hints given him. Their romance proceeds from there.

 

A few of the films' memorable lines;

 

Julie to companion :"I haven't been alone since I was twelve years old".

 

Nicks father Pete (Borgnine) to Nick: "Spit on me for luck".

 

Nick's clueless mother Mary (Nancy R. ****) to Julie, at her 30th wedding anniversary party--"Everybody is staring" (with good reason, as it turns out).

 

Nick to Julie, after he's found out the terrible truth--"I'll never get clean again!"

 

Julie to Nick, after he's asked how many men she's been with--"Why count waves in the ocean?"

 

Lollobrigida is ok as Julie, and has a way with a sarcastic line.  Franciosa is just terrible as Nick; nobody is that stupid.  Borgnine yells his way through his part, but manages some good acting in his few quiet scenes. 

 

Check out the portrait above Lollobrigida's bed in the two scenes where it's shown.  It looks like a fuzzy picture of Elizabeth Taylor in her slip from "Cat on a Hot Tin Roof" (1958),  The artist didn't even bother to change the hair color.

 

If you like melodramas to laugh at, this film's for you.  2.7/4.

 

Edit--Otto censored the actress's name.

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I caught the end of GO NAKED.... and- yeah- I think it's far to say it would place somewhere in the mid-range of the LYLAH scale.

 

ps- it's hard to believe Tony Franciosa was "a thing."

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"Go Naked in the World" (1961)-

This one is early 60's MGM melodrama, and full of howlers.

 

A few of the films' memorable lines;

Julie to Nick, after he's asked how many men she's been with--"Why count waves in the ocean?"

 

 

 

DANG HOE!

I'm gonna use that line some time IRL...

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S'more in RE: BLITHE SPIRIT

(SPOILERS!)

 

IN RE: THE ENDING...The only honest answer I can give on how I would end it is I DON'T KNOW. i think i would need a brainstorming session with input from others and possibly some mind-altering substances involved to come up with just the right ending for it...one thing i did not bring up in discussing the film was that it reminded me quite a bit of DEATH BECOMES HER- which has built a well-deserved cult following since its release- and many of the British horror anthologies that followed- as well as TALES FROM THE CRYPT- that last one kinda killed the genre in a way because every episode gave us an awful person who does awful things and is ALWAYS ALWAYS killed in some ironic form with NO VARIATION on the theme and zero surprise.

 

thus, watching BLITHE SPIRIT, i kinda sensed where it was going- but only because its original trail has been MUCH HACKED UPON since first it was blazed.

 

I'm sure BLITHE SPIRIT was a sensation when it came out because it was rather unexpected for it to end in such a way- being one of the first stories to use the above discussed method of storytelling- although the "horror" is subtle and the fact the protagonists are- kind of- awful people is subtle and hidden by their intrinsic Britishness.

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S'more in RE: BLITHE SPIRIT

(SPOILERS!)

 

IN RE: THE ENDING...The only honest answer I can give on how I would end it is I DON'T KNOW. i think i would need a brainstorming session with input from others and possibly some mind-altering substances involved to come up with just the right ending for it...one thing i did not bring up in discussing the film was that it reminded me quite a bit of DEATH BECOMES HER- which has built a well-deserved cult following since its release- and many of the British horror anthologies that followed- as well as TALES FROM THE CRYPT- that last one kinda killed the genre in a way because every episode gave us an awful person who does awful things and is ALWAYS ALWAYS killed in some ironic form with NO VARIATION on the theme and zero surprise.

 

thus, watching BLITHE SPIRIT, i kinda sensed where it was going- but only because its original trail has been MUCH HACKED UPON since first it was blazed.

 

I'm sure BLITHE SPIRIT was a sensation when it came out because it was rather unexpected for it to end in such a way- being one of the first stories to use the above discussed method of storytelling- although the "horror" is subtle and the fact the protagonists are- kind of- awful people is subtle and hidden by their intrinsic Britishness.

You know come to think of it I remember liking the film, but can't remember how it ended, maybe it was that unaffecting.

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The restoration of this film was very good.  I'd never heard of Constance Cummings until 2016 when she was a Summer Under The Stars honoree.  She had an interesting career; one of the few American-born actors or actresses who went overseas to continue and complete their vocation.

 

I saw Constance Cummings in Wings, at the National Theatre in London, in 1979. Ten years later, I saw her in Semi-Monde, a rarely performed Noel Coward play. It was a one-off benefit for an actors' charity and also featured Judi Dench, Bob Hoskins, Kenneth Branagh, Elisabeth Welch, Evelyn Laye, Joyce Carey, Joanna Lumley, Tim Pigott-Smith, and many others.

 

Irene Worth, who was a friend of mine, was another American actress who spent much of her career in London, although unlike Ms. Cummings, Irene came back to America later in life, to live on 56th Street in NYC.

 

Regarding Blithe Spirit, there are a few television productions of the play, include one with Noel Coward, Lauren Bacall, and Claudette Colbert.

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You know come to think of it I remember liking the film, but can't remember how it ended, maybe it was that unaffecting.

Last I checked, it's online in full if you're down with that sort of thing.

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