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I Just Watched...

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2 hours ago, TomJH said:

Appointment With Danger is a fun film. It's been a while since I saw it but I recall enjoying that moment in which Alan Ladd laid Jack Webb out cold.

Then he gets the crushed ice in the towel and when he's through talking with Stewart he drops the bag of ice on Webb's face

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We recorded and watched The Window last night. It played on Noir Alley that morning. It was very good and the young Bobby Driscol was fantastic as The Boy Who Cried Wolf.

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Just now, Hoganman1 said:

We recorded and watched The Window last night. It played on Noir Alley that morning. It was very good and the young Bobby Driscol was fantastic as The Boy Who Cried Wolf.

A great film, I've never read Woolrich's short story, can't ever seem to find it though in the story it's a bit more gruesome in details, the Stewart and Roman characters in the book actually cut up the body and put it in a coulpe of big suitcases and then go hide it in the abandoned building. 

It's similar in that respect to Lina Wertmuller's Seven Beauties

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6 minutes ago, cigarjoe said:

A great film, I've never read Woolrich's short story, can't ever seem to find it though in the story it's a bit more gruesome in details, the Stewart and Roman characters in the book actually cut up the body and put it in a coulpe of big suitcases and then go hide it in the abandoned building. 

It's similar in that respect to Lina Wertmuller's Seven Beauties

Although it is pretty gruesome disposing of the victim that way makes more sense. I found it a little unbelievable that Stewart was able to carry a dead body out a window and up a fire escape ladder. I'm guessing the 1949 board of censors would not have allowed even the suggestion of a mutilation on film. Still a great flick, though.

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2 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

A great film, I've never read Woolrich's short story, can't ever seem to find it though in the story it's a bit more gruesome in details, the Stewart and Roman characters in the book actually cut up the body and put it in a coulpe of big suitcases and then go hide it in the abandoned building. 

It's similar in that respect to Lina Wertmuller's Seven Beauties

I was searching the web to see if the story was available in PDF format, but alas, I was unsuccessful.

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4 minutes ago, Janet0312 said:

I was searching the web to see if the story was available in PDF format, but alas, I was unsuccessful.

Yep I've tried also. I did find Rear Window's Woolrich short story which was interesting, and very similar also. A different version of the same story, with different character dynamics. 

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What are some other Fox docu-dramas?

The House on 92nd Street
Boomerang!
The Street With No Name
The Iron Curtain
Panic in the Streets
Mr. 880

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I'm guessing the 1949 board of censors would not have allowed even the suggestion of a mutilation on film.

The 1954 censors did for Rear Window.

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7 minutes ago, Fedya said:

 

 

The 1954 censors did for Rear Window.

"Must've splattered a lot... Come on, that's what we're all thinkin'. He killed her in there, now he has to clean up those stains before he leaves." 

Hitchcock did a good job alluding to Raymond Burr's wife's head being buried in the flower garden, before the neighbor's dog got too curious and Burr had to move the head. 

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Just now, Fedya said:

Thelma Ritter always got to deliver such great lines.

She does.  She has the best lines in Rear Window and All About Eve.  I like that her characters don't beat around the bush, she just comes out and says what everyone is thinking.  In All About Eve, before she unfortunately disappears while retrieving the movie star's sable, Ritter serves as Bette Davis' "get a grip" friend--the type of friend that everyone needs. 

Back to Rear Window...

Frankly, I'm glad that the mutilation of Mrs. Thorwald's remains was played down and her dismemberment was only hinted at, though don't the police state something about her being scattered all over Manhattan?  Personally, I'm glad it was only hinted at that her head was buried in the garden, I don't want a decapitated head popping out at me.  The only time that a decapitated head scene has been effective for me is in Jaws when Richard Dreyfuss is underwater exploring the sunken ship of Ben Gardner's boat. 

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I love Thelma's clever lines here and in other films.  I too am glad that Mrs. Thorwald's remains anddismemberment was spoken little of.  That is awful even about her head maybe buried in the garden!  Yes, Thorwald was terrible, even bumping of the little dog in the basket. 

This film was effectively chilling without going too far in the descriptions of murder!  I for one agree there.

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I just watched THE IMMORTAL SERGEANT '43 starring Henry Fonda & Maureen O'Hara. The film group I belong to screened it as our Veterans Day movie of our "Monday Night Series" and is the only movie this season I had never seen before.

Henry Fonda was a shy guy, kind of walked all over as a civilian who enlisted in the Army in the early days of WW2. The movie followed a small group camped in the northernmost African desert commanded by the great Thomas Mitchell as the Sergeant. There are a few white knuckle scenes as they skirmish with the enemy and of course things go from bad to worse. They lose men, equipment and tragically, they lose their Sergeant, Mitchell.

The guys are stranded in the desert, and now Fonda's charactor is in command. All the while you hear Mitchell's voice, as Fonda recollects what his Sergeant would tell him in such a situation. Gorgeous Maureen O'Hara also pops up in Fonda's mind, in flashbacks of incidents "back home". These touches make the desert bearable for Fonda as well as us.

Of course, a few of them survive and Fonda reunites with O'Hara a changed man. But in this case, he's changed for the better, now confident & assertive after his war ordeal.

This obviously was an enlistment recruiting "feel good" film for WW2. Fonda was really good, especially when knowing he didn't want to make this movie. I especially enjoyed Melville Cooper as one of the troop instead of in his more typical snotty milquetoast roles. Another highlight was seeing Mitchell breathing -obviously still alive- while the cast stands over his "dead" body! You see things like that on the big screen.

You know a movie "has" an audience when you could hear a pin drop for most of the picture. The group erupted in applause at the end and walked out smiling.

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I watched "Here Comes Mr. Jordon" this past Sunday night and everytime I watch it I enjoy it even more.  The movies is a complete summary of why movies were "golden" in the "golden era" of movies.  The supporting actors of Claude Raines, Edward Everett Horton and James Gleason make this movie a classic representative of what studios did best in the 40's. 

When I see movies such as this as well as some others that rely heavily on the character actors to give the film that something special it saddens me that at TCM they really don't get the recognition they deserve.  I know they had a focus on character actors this past year but they hardly touched the well of talent that the character actors possessed.

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This afternoon I'll see Casablanca at my local CineMark theater sponsored by TCM...

Thank you TCM...

image.png.fe2600c0e2ec12590ceb0b159de723a9.png

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4 hours ago, Emily Dean said:

I watched "Here Comes Mr. Jordon" this past Sunday night and everytime I watch it I enjoy it even more.  The movies is a complete summary of why movies were "golden" in the "golden era" of movies.  The supporting actors of Claude Raines, Edward Everett Horton and James Gleason make this movie a classic representative of what studios did best in the 40's. 

Most people don't know that Columbia, for some odd reason, decided to boost Rita Hayworth's Down to Earth (1947)--a movie unfairly cited as "inspiring 'Xanadu'", which is thoroughly inaccurate--into a pseudo-sequel to Jordan, with Horton and Gleason's characters returning, as Gleason now can't get anyone to believe his claims of Greek mythological characters in the city.

No idea why, but a funny follow-up to watch.

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8 hours ago, JakeHolman said:

This afternoon I'll see Casablanca at my local CineMark theater sponsored by TCM...

Thank you TCM...

image.png.fe2600c0e2ec12590ceb0b159de723a9.png

Great movie to watch on the Big Screen.  Time well spent...

 

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Great movie to watch on the Big Screen.  Time well spent...

Agree, much better than your cockamamie barrages in off topic chit chat.

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Jackie Brown (1997) Soul Noir

Jackie-Brown%2Bfilm%2BPoster.jpg

 

A great amalgamation of Blaxploitation, Neo Noir, and Elmore Leonard, by Quentin Tarantino.

This film is a lot of fun to watch, Tarantino weaves his magic in his Tarantinian way. Snappy dialog, check, pop references, check, soul music, check, low life losers, check, bringing back blasts from the past in the forms of Pam Grier and Robert Forster, check. The film is probably one of his more restrained efforts, but it fits perfectly for Film Noir.

Noirs were almost always about small time losers. Low key stories of life on the cusp. Tales that drift to the wrong side of the tracks. It's about poor schmucks who are trying to get by any way they can. And if in the process they have to step over on the dark side occasionally, and make deals with the boogie man, well, in this case, a girl's gotta do what a girl's gotta do.

This film is full of these amusing vignettes, and it's a fun ride. Everyone is jockeying for position. Odell wants his cash, the ATF and LAPD want Odell, Max wants Jackie, and Jackie wants her freedom and a payback from Odell. How all this plays out is part of the magic of the movie and it's the getting there with wonderful fleshed out characters that's a hoot.

The film stars Pam Grier as Jackie Brown, Samuel L. Jackson as Ordell Robbie, Robert Forster as Max Cherry, Bridget Fonda as Melanie Ralston, Michael Keaton as Ray Nicolette, Robert De Niro as Louis Gara, Chris Tucker as Beaumont Livingston, Michael Bowen as Mark Dargus, Lisa Gay Hamilton as Sheronda, Tommy "Tiny" Lister Jr. as Winston, Hattie Winston as Simone and Sid Haig as the Judge.

Cinematography was by Guillermo Navarro and the soundtrack has cuts by Bobby Womack, Smokey Robinson, Brothers Johnson, The Supremes, Pam Grier, Bloodstone, Roy Ayers, Johnny Cash, Jermaine Jackson, The Delfonics, Minnie Riperton, Foxy Brown, Isaac Hayes, Bill Withers, The Meters, Elliot Easton's Tiki Gods, Elvin Bishop, The Guess Who, The Grassroots, Randy Crawford, The Vampire Sound Incorporation, Orchestra Harlow, Umberto Smaila, Snakepit, Brad Hatfield and Dick Walter.

Partial review with some screencaps in Film Noir/Gangster and full review with more screencaps and dialog at Noirsville

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FARGO (1996): 

According to the Internet, this film is classified as a "reality-based crime drama." I guess I'd have to agree with that. This film doesn't contain any true "comedy" moments, but there are some scenes/situations I had to sort of chuckle at. 

Frances McDormand was great as a small-town, heavily pregnant, Minnesota chief of police, who finds herself on the trail of 2 rather inept kidnappers-turned-murderers. Steve Buscemi gets the most screen time out of the two criminals, which makes sense, since his blonde-and-brawny counterpart has the personality of a sack of beans. 

I didn't hate this one, but I do enjoy the Coen brothers other hit "Big Lebowski" more. 

Image result for fargo 1996

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On 11/13/2017 at 4:42 PM, Fedya said:

Thelma Ritter always got to deliver such great lines.

A particular favorite of mine comes from "All About Eve" (1950), when Anne Baxter's "Eve" is telling the "true" story of her life: "What a story! Everything but the bloodhounds snappin' at her rear end!" 

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5 minutes ago, NickAndNora34 said:

FARGO (1996): 

According to the Internet, this film is classified as a "reality-based crime drama." I guess I'd have to agree with that. This film doesn't contain any true "comedy" moments, but there are some scenes/situations I had to sort of chuckle at. 

Frances McDormand was great as a small-town, heavily pregnant, Minnesota chief of police, who finds herself on the trail of 2 rather inept kidnappers-turned-murderers. Steve Buscemi gets the most screen time out of the two criminals, which makes sense, since his blonde-and-brawny counterpart has the personality of a sack of beans. 

I didn't hate this one, but I do enjoy the Coen brothers other hit "Big Lebowski" more. 

Fargo is hilarious. I laugh through most of it every time I watch it. William H. Macy is brilliant as the not-brilliant "mastermind". The interplay between Buscemi and Peter Stormare is priceless, with one of the best pay-offs in film history (the woodchipper). Marge interviewing the prostitutes, Marge's awkward dinner date with her old classsmate, Harve Presnell as the grouchy father-in-law...I find much of it a source of amusement. And the score and cinematography are fantastic.

By the way, despite what it says, it's not based on a true story. That was another joke, doncha know.

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BIG BUSINESS (1988): starring Bette Midler and Lily Tomlin. 

An overall silly comedy, this film centers essentially around a hospital mix-up, wherein 2 sets of twins are born, and one of each is sent to live with the wrong family. The wealthy family decides to name the girls Sadie and Rose, and after overhearing this, the dirt-poor farmer (with 10 kids already) decides to name his girls Rose and Sadie too. Honestly, this movie gets a little dicey at times, but Lily and Bette are their usual funny selves. 

Score: 3/5

Image result for big business 1988

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PENNIES FROM HEAVEN (1981): STARRING STEVE MARTIN AND BERNADETTE PETERS

This is a movie musical set in the early 1930's, reminiscent of all those fantastic Busby Berkeley phenomenons. I found it interesting how no one's real singing voices were used, instead all the actors lip-synced to popular 20s and 30s songs. 

It centers around Arthur, a man who knows his music. He is married to a rather lack-luster woman named Joan, whose middle name is most likely "Propriety." Arthur essentially begs Joan to allow him to use the money her father left her to run and own his own record store. Unfortunately, no one is buying. Arthur meets a young schoolteacher named Eileen Everson (Bernadette Peters) and promptly begins an affair with her (although he lies to her, and she is unaware that he already has a wife). 

Eileen becomes pregnant with Arthur's child, and upon this discovery, the audience witnesses Arthur trying to make it with a young blind girl whom he encounters while taking a break from work (some break, no one's even buying anything from you). After Eileen tells Arthur about his child, he lets slip that he's married, refuses to divorce his wife, and Eileen ends up becoming a "lady of the evening" and getting rid of the baby. 

All in all, I basically only watched this because one of my role models, Bernadette Peters, was starring in it. Steve Martin, I could take or leave in this. 

Score: 2.5/5

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