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The Brute Man (7/10) 1946

NOTE: I actually saw this a week ago, but just now had time to post here.

This was a B film made by Universal but sold to poverty row outfit PRC for distribution, and there are no big names here and no big budget, but it is very poignant for several reasons, which I will get into later.

This is basically a 20th century Frankenstein story. Someone is going around murdering people with his bare hands - "The Creeper" as he is called by the newspapers and the police. The audience sees the murderer from the beginning, and none of the murders seem premeditated. It is initially a deformed man with monstrous strength apparently visiting people he knew before, and when they become afraid or try to scream or run, he kills them in anger.

The police almost catch "The Creeper" after the second murder, but he climbs up a fire escape and into the apartment window of a girl playing a piano. The girl seems unafraid of him and when she asks him if he is in trouble followed by knocking on her door, she hides the man and tells the police that she has seen nor heard anything strange. However, the police never identified themselves, and later you can hear running, yelling, and shooting nearby. If The Creeper is in her apartment who exactly are the police shooting at? But I digress. The Creeper learns the girl is blind, cannot see his ugliness and is therefore friendly, plus she didn't know it was the police at the door, because they never said who they were. Like the Frankenstein monster, in a blind person The Creeper has found a friend.

Meanwhile the police have connected the first two victims and go to visit two people who were connected to them 15 years before in college and who are now married to each other and doing well for themselves. They tell a tale of a popular athlete, Hal Moffat, who was tutored in chemistry by the husband, but when Hal got a little too friendly with his girl - now his wife - the tutor gave the jock the wrong answers to questions for an oral exam the next day. As a result, Hal failed the oral test and was given a long complicated chemistry experiment to do as remedial makeup work. Always having a bad temper, and realizing he had been deliberately tricked, Hal threw the test tubes to the ground, but the liquid splashed on his face. In the hospital, the doctor told his friends that Hal's features would be deformed, and that even his glands, which effect how features are formed and how bones grow, would be effected.

So we have a blind girl who needs money for an operation to restore her sight, a bitter homicidal man who knows that the couple who betrayed him years ago are doing well financially, and who also tends to take violent revenge on anybody who crosses him, and the police who now know who the murderer is, they just have no idea how and where he is living and what he looks like. How will all of this work out? Watch and find out.

The poignant part of this is how art so imitated the life of the man who plays "The Creeper", Rondo Hatton. Mr. Hatton was also a popular athlete during high school who was injured by poison gas during his service in WWI. That chemical exposure later caused acromegaly, a slowly progressive deforming of bones in the head, hands and feet, and internal and external soft tissues. The deformity, which was progressive, broke up his first marriage. He did, however, marry a second time. So it may be that the low imdb rating (3.8)  is from people who do not like the fact that Universal, who had a contract with Mr. Hatton, used his deformity to exploit him in such roles. However, I think his performance was pretty good. After all, there is no time for real dramatic depth in these old B films. I'd recommend it as a well done post war (WWII) horror film.

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15 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

The Golden Arrow (1936) - Mediocre romantic comedy from Warner Brothers/First National and director Alfred E. Green. Johnny Jones (George Brent) is a cynical newspaper reporter assigned to get an interview with reclusive millionaire heiress Daisy Appleby (Bette Davis). When the two meet, there are sparks, but he doesn't want to be a "kept man". Little does he know that Daisy is actually a phony, a promotional gimmick for a cosmetics company acting the part of a glamorous socialite in order to garner headlines and sell facial cream. Also featuring Eugene Pallette, Dick Foran, Carol Hughes, Catherine Doucet, Craig Reynolds, Ivan Lebedeff, Eddie Acuff, E.E. Clive, Henry O'Neill, Mary Treen, and Hobart Cavanaugh.

I liked Brent a little more in this one, but conversely I felt Davis didn't come across as well, as playing fluttery "girlish" roles really wasn't her strong suit. She's not bad, but the material would have been better served with some one else. The finale, involving Davis showing up at a social event with a black eye, much to the smirking amusement of those in attendance, is definitely a sign of the times.  (6/10)

Source: TCM.

128906-the-golden-arrow-0-230-0-345-crop

This was one of the films that caused Bette to go to Britain to get out of her WB contract.   See how the posters says 'The Academy Award Winner';    Well Bette said to Jack "yea, I'm an Oscar winner and you put me in this crap!'.    (ok, I'm making that quote up,  but I bet I'm close to the truth). 

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On 1/7/2018 at 7:34 PM, TomJH said:

I like the Astaire-Rogers musicals though I'm not as much a fan as are many other posters on these boards. The comic support to be found in them, though (Eric Blore, Edward Everett Horton, Victor Moore or the priceless Erik Rhodes) is a hoot and a half.

Follow the Fleet, though, has one of my favourite dance numbers of the entire series- Irving Berlin's beautiful Let's Face The Music And Dance. The art deco set, the clever story telling (with even, daringly, a contemplation of suicide by two lost souls!), and, of course, the sheer beauty and elegance of Fred and Ginger in motion make it a sublime joy to behold.

 

That number and the feathers dress (was that Top Hat?) are my favorites......

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Isle of Fury (1936) - Tropical programmer from Warner Brothers and director Frank McDonald. Val Stevens (Humphrey Bogart) and Lucille Gordon (Margaret Lindsay) are getting married on the small Pacific island where they live when a ship crashes off-shore during a storm. One of the rescued sailors is Eric Blake (Donald Woods) a man with a secret agenda that threatens the newlyweds' happiness. Also featuring E.E. Clive, Paul Graetz, Gordon Hart, George Regas, Sidney Bracey, and Tetsu Komai.

This early starring role for Bogart is cheap, silly, and a little boring. He also looks goofy with his pencil mustache. The "highlight" of the film is a poorly staged underwater battle with a giant octopus.   (5/10)

Source: TCM.

I love this poster that in no way resembles anything in the movie.

MV5BMTk0Mzg3MzcwOV5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTgwMTMx

isle-of-fury-humphrey-bogart.jpg

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35 minutes ago, Hibi said:

That number and the feathers dress (was that Top Hat?) are my favorites......

Yes, the feather dress was in the "Cheek to Cheek" number in Top Hat. My favorite Astaire musical is of course Damsel in Distress by my favorite composer - George Gershwin.

 

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Klondike Annie (1936) - Turn-of-the-century comedy from Paramount Pictures and director Raoul Walsh. Mae West stars as Rose Carlton, the "Frisco Doll", a nightclub singer in 1890's San Francisco Chinatown. When she gets accused a terrible crime, she books passage on a ship headed north, to the Alaskan gold rush country. The ship's captain, Bull Brackett (Victor McLaglen), takes a shine to her, naturally, and helps her to assume the identity of Sister Annie Alden, a respected, pious church charity worker who is headed to Nome to minister to the needy. Canadian Mountie Jack Forrest (Phillip Reed) is suspicious, and tries to find out the truth. Also featuring Helen Jerome Eddy, Harry Beresford, Harold Huber, Lucile Gleason, Conway Tearle, Esther Howard, Soo Yong, Philip Ahn, Jack Mulhall, and Lawrence Grant.

Much humor comes from the unlikely scenario of vintage Mae West masquerading as a wholesome church lady. She gets to say one of my favorite of her one-liners, "Given the choice of two evils, I usually go for the one I haven't tried yet." I perhaps expected more fireworks, or at least scenery chewing, from the pairing of West with McLaglen, but they play relatively subdued with one another.   (7/10)

Source: Universal DVD, part of the Mae West: The Essential Collection.

a9f244d2c514c5bfbf394b82f58e9025.jpg

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3 hours ago, calvinnme said:

The Brute Man (7/10) 1946

The poignant part of this is how art so imitated the life of the man who plays "The Creeper", Rondo Hatton. Mr. Hatton was also a popular athlete during high school who was injured by poison gas during his service in WWI. That chemical exposure later caused acromegaly, a slowly progressive deforming of bones in the head, hands and feet, and internal and external soft tissues. 

However, he was average height, so the film had to use very noticeably short actors to play the police in chase scenes, to make Hatton seem more Brute.

A point MST3K made much of in their heckling.  :lol:  ("We represent the Lollipop Guild...")

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2 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Isle of Fury (1936) - Tropical programmer from Warner Brothers and director Frank McDonald. Val Stevens (Humphrey Bogart) and Lucille Gordon (Margaret Lindsay) are getting married on the small Pacific island where they live when a ship crashes off-shore during a storm. One of the rescued sailors is Eric Blake (Donald Woods) a man with a secret agenda that threatens the newlyweds' happiness. Also featuring E.E. Clive, Paul Graetz, Gordon Hart, George Regas, Sidney Bracey, and Tetsu Komai.

This early starring role for Bogart is cheap, silly, and a little boring. He also looks goofy with his pencil mustache. The "highlight" of the film is a poorly staged underwater battle with a giant octopus.   (5/10)

Source: TCM.

Yes, and Margaret Lindsay spends all of her time looking at her new groom (Bogie) like she just spent all of her money on a house she just doesn't like. In what universe would a woman prefer the bland Donald Woods to Bogie? I guess to make it halfway believable they had to give Bogart that ridiculous moustache.

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2 hours ago, Gershwin fan said:

Yes, the feather dress was in the "Cheek to Cheek" number in Top Hat. My favorite Astaire musical is of course Damsel in Distress by my favorite composer - George Gershwin.

 

 

Thought so. Most critics consider Swing Time the best, but I cant stand Victor Moore, so it's not my favorite....

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Ladies in Love (1936) - Triptych romance from 20th Century-Fox and director Edward H. Griffith. Three young ladies become roommates in an apartment in Budapest. They each make a wish for their future. Martha (Janet Gaynor) is in love with medical doctor Rudi (Don Ameche), but she takes a job as assistant to magician Sandor (Alan Mowbray). Yoli (Constance Bennett) hopes to marry rich guy John (Paul Lukas), but runs into some competition with sex kitten Marie (Simone Simon). Susie (Loretta Young) falls in love with handsome Karl (Tyrone Power) only to learn that he's promised to another. Also featuring Wilfrid Lawson, J. Edward Bromberg, Virginia Field, Frank Dawson, and Vesey O'Davoren.

There's enough going on here to hold one's interest, even if none of it is very original. The three leading ladies are good, and I liked Mowbray's turn as a fussy stage magician. Power got a big career boost from his small role, with Fox getting enough mail about him that they made him the lead in Lloyd's of London, which set him on the path of stardom.   (7/10)

Source: TCM.

0923405230e54ee0920df8ec494c1e68.jpg

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10 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

Ladies in Love (1936) - Triptych romance from 20th Century-Fox and director Edward H. Griffith. Three young ladies become roommates in an apartment in Budapest. They each make a wish for their future. Martha (Janet Gaynor) is in love with medical doctor Rudi (Don Ameche), but she takes a job as assistant to magician Sandor (Alan Mowbray). Yoli (Constance Bennett) hopes to marry rich guy John (Paul Lukas), but runs into some competition with sex kitten Marie (Simone Simon). Susie (Loretta Young) falls in love with handsome Karl (Tyrone Power) only to learn that he's promised to another. Also featuring Wilfrid Lawson, J. Edward Bromberg, Virginia Field, Frank Dawson, and Vesey O'Davoren.

There's enough going on here to hold one's interest, even if none of it is very original. The three leading ladies are good, and I liked Mowbray's turn as a fussy stage magician. Power got a big career boost from his small role, with Fox getting enough mail about him that they made him in the lead in Lloyd's of London, which set him on the path of stardom.   (7/10)

Source: TCM.

0923405230e54ee0920df8ec494c1e68.jpg

 

This was Gaynor's last Fox film. She was less than thrilled with this project where she was just part of a large ensemble cast rather than the star of the vehicle and she left the studio to freelance for awhile....

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17 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Somehow a shirtless Claude Rains seems wrong.

Watch Key Largo for Edward G. Robinson's bathtub scene.

or Island in the Sky for Andy Devine doing a cannonball into a swimming pool.

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47 minutes ago, Hibi said:

 

This was Gaynor's last Fox film. She was less than thrilled with this project where she was just part of a large ensemble cast rather than the star of the vehicle and she left the studio to freelance for awhile....

The studio was a lot more interested in their new French arrival Simone Simon,  than the rather unremarkable Gaynor.    Look at the poster.    The other 3 gals,  all fairly well known stars in 1936,  where not too happy Simon got such billing. 

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I wouldnt say Gaynor was unremarkable, but Zanuck had little use for her. She proved she was still box office in her next vehicle, Star Is Born. But her peak was the early 30s and times were changing. She saw the writing on the wall..........

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5 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Isle of Fury (1936) - Tropical programmer from Warner Brothers and director Frank McDonald. Val Stevens (Humphrey Bogart) and Lucille Gordon (Margaret Lindsay) are getting married on the small Pacific island where they live when a ship crashes off-shore during a storm. One of the rescued sailors is Eric Blake (Donald Woods) a man with a secret agenda that threatens the newlyweds' happiness. Also featuring E.E. Clive, Paul Graetz, Gordon Hart, George Regas, Sidney Bracey, and Tetsu Komai.

This early starring role for Bogart is cheap, silly, and a little boring. He also looks goofy with his pencil mustache. The "highlight" of the film is a poorly staged underwater battle with a giant octopus.   (5/10)

Source: TCM.

I love this poster that in no way resembles anything in the movie.

MV5BMTk0Mzg3MzcwOV5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTgwMTMx

isle-of-fury-humphrey-bogart.jpg

As evidenced by this film and “Virginia City,” Bogart does NOT have a mustache face. 

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6 hours ago, calvinnme said:

The Brute Man (7/10) 1946

NOTE: I actually saw this a week ago, but just now had time to post here.

This was a B film made by Universal but sold to poverty row outfit PRC for distribution, and there are no big names here and no big budget, but it is very poignant for several reasons, which I will get into later.

This is basically a 20th century Frankenstein story. Someone is going around murdering people with his bare hands - "The Creeper" as he is called by the newspapers and the police. The audience sees the murderer from the beginning, and none of the murders seem premeditated. It is initially a deformed man with monstrous strength apparently visiting people he knew before, and when they become afraid or try to scream or run, he kills them in anger.

The police almost catch "The Creeper" after the second murder, but he climbs up a fire escape and into the apartment window of a girl playing a piano. The girl seems unafraid of him and when she asks him if he is in trouble followed by knocking on her door, she hides the man and tells the police that she has seen nor heard anything strange. However, the police never identified themselves, and later you can hear running, yelling, and shooting nearby. If The Creeper is in her apartment who exactly are the police shooting at? But I digress. The Creeper learns the girl is blind, cannot see his ugliness and is therefore friendly, plus she didn't know it was the police at the door, because they never said who they were. Like the Frankenstein monster, in a blind person The Creeper has found a friend.

Meanwhile the police have connected the first two victims and go to visit two people who were connected to them 15 years before in college and who are now married to each other and doing well for themselves. They tell a tale of a popular athlete, Hal Moffat, who was tutored in chemistry by the husband, but when Hal got a little too friendly with his girl - now his wife - the tutor gave the jock the wrong answers to questions for an oral exam the next day. As a result, Hal failed the oral test and was given a long complicated chemistry experiment to do as remedial makeup work. Always having a bad temper, and realizing he had been deliberately tricked, Hal threw the test tubes to the ground, but the liquid splashed on his face. In the hospital, the doctor told his friends that Hal's features would be deformed, and that even his glands, which effect how features are formed and how bones grow, would be effected.

So we have a blind girl who needs money for an operation to restore her sight, a bitter homicidal man who knows that the couple who betrayed him years ago are doing well financially, and who also tends to take violent revenge on anybody who crosses him, and the police who now know who the murderer is, they just have no idea how and where he is living and what he looks like. How will all of this work out? Watch and find out.

The poignant part of this is how art so imitated the life of the man who plays "The Creeper", Rondo Hatton. Mr. Hatton was also a popular athlete during high school who was injured by poison gas during his service in WWI. That chemical exposure later caused acromegaly, a slowly progressive deforming of bones in the head, hands and feet, and internal and external soft tissues. The deformity, which was progressive, broke up his first marriage. He did, however, marry a second time. So it may be that the low imdb rating (3.8)  is from people who do not like the fact that Universal, who had a contract with Mr. Hatton, used his deformity to exploit him in such roles. However, I think his performance was pretty good. After all, there is no time for real dramatic depth in these old B films. I'd recommend it as a well done post war (WWII) horror film.

Thanks for the synopsis/review. I found this on Amazon Prime and added it to my watch list. I haven't seen this thing in ages!!!

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I watched 20,000 YEARS IN SING SING, with Spencer Tracy as a cocky, smart alecky hood sent up to Sing Sing on a 5 to 30 year stretch, certain his notoriety will get him special treatment in the Big House, but the warden has other ideas....

While not a classic by any means, the only teaming of Tracy and Bette Davis in this film does have some interest.

Tracy is interesting in a role that would have perhaps been better suited for Cagney, Robinson, George Raft or a pre-40's stardom Bogart. Even Paul Muni probably would have made a better fit....still it is fun to watch Tracy's character acting all tough and he's-all-that and continually getting put in his place by the warden.

The idea though of letting convicts out for a short period of time and relying on their word to come back, is naïve, to say the least. No penal system today would even contemplate such a plan.

I'll give it a 7/10, because it certainly is watchable, even if it isn't up to the usual standards of a Spencer Tracy or Bette Davis flick.

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Lloyd's of London (1936) - Lavish historical romance from 20th Century-Fox and director Henry King. The film tracks the life of Jonathan Blake, who as a child (Freddie Bartholomew) in 1777 Norfolk, is friends with neighbor kid Horatio Nelson. After an adventure makes them privy to valuable information, young Jonathan travels to London, to the Lloyd coffee shop where various insurance syndicates do business. The boy begins an apprenticeship under John Angerstein (Sir Guy Standing), and as he grows into adulthood (Tyrone Power), he becomes both financially and emotionally embroiled in the Napoleonic Wars, which see his old friend Horatio become a revered naval hero. Blake runs into romantic trouble with the lovely Lady Elizabeth (Madeleine Carroll), who is already married to cad Lord Stacy (George Sanders). Also featuring C. Aubrey Smith, Virginia Field, Robert Greig, Athur Hohl, Montagu Love, Una O'Connor, Douglas Scott, J.M. Kerrigan, Forrester Harvey, Gavin Muir, E.E. Clive, and Miles Mander.

Chock full of opulent costumes, meticulous sets and dashed romance, it's easy to see why this was a major hit at the box office at a time when period dramas were popular. Power, in his star-making role, looks lean and intense. He received fourth billing, below Carroll, Standing, and top-billed Bartholomew, who only appears in the first 15 minutes or so. This movie also marked the American film debut of George Sanders, who's already playing a despicable dandy. I'm not sure how much of the history is true, and there are lengthy passages of discussion about monetary responsibilities, and fretting over investment losses, which doesn't sound particularly thrilling in a dramatic sense, but it's handled well enough. The movie earned 2 Oscar nominations, for Best Art Direction (William S. Darling) and Best Editing (Barbara McLean).   (7/10)

Source: Fox Movie Channel.

poster_lloydsoflondon.jpg

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I just watched Home Again, which I got free at Redbox. I hope I can wash the stench off me. Even for free, it was to costly.

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It (2017) - Slightly updated, partial retelling of Stephen King's massive tome, from New Line Cinema and director Andy Muschietti. It's 1988, and a group of young teens in the town of Derry, Maine are terrorized by an otherworldly clown named Pennywise (Bill Skarsgard), who can make them see their worst fears. They must band together to stop the fiend before it kills them all. Starring Jaeden Lieberher, Jeremy Ray Taylor, Sophia Lillis, Finn Wolfhard, Chosen Jacobs, Jack Dylan Grazer, Wyatt Oleff, Jackson Robert Scott, and Nicholas Hamilton. 

King's novel succeeded in large part due to the nostalgic immersion into Baby Boomer cultural touchstones. The filmmakers decision to update the setting to the late 1980's is understandable in the sense that the follow-up, featuring the adult versions of the characters, will now chronologically fit with modern times. The filmmakers also decide to forgo any excessive wallowing in 1980's pop iconography, with a movie poster here and a song there the only references. That boils the story down to the horror film essentials, and while there's nothing original in the mix, it is well presented, and features a handful of memorable scare moments. The special effects are also largely successful, and Skarsgard is good as the monstrous clown. The filmmakers also made the interesting decision to not explain Pennywise, perhaps leaving that for the sequel. I'd be curious what a first time viewer, with no knowledge of the source novel or the previous 1990 TV mini-series version, thought of the story. 

I recently caught up with the first season of the TV series Stranger Things, which almost certainly had some impact on this film version of It, even going so far as to cast one of the show's leads in this as well. That's not a problem, though, as that kid (Wolfhard) is good in both, and the rest of the cast in this is also terrific, with Lillis, as the sole girl in the group, and the aforementioned Wolfhard, as the foul-mouthed jokester, the stand-outs.  (7/10)

Source: Warner Blu-Ray.

it-movie-child-cast.jpg

IT3.jpg

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I watched Don't Bother to Knock on the Fox Movie Channel last night with Richard Widmark, Marilyn Monroe and, in her movie debut, Anne Bancroft plus a supporting cast full of familiar faces like Laurene Tuttle, Jim Backus and Elisha Cook, Jr.  It's early in Monroe's career (1952) and it's a dramatic role about a babysitter (Monroe) with mental problems. The story takes place in a New York hotel where the elevator operator man (Cook) recommends his niece (Monroe) for a babysitting gig.  Of course, because it is Marilyn Monroe, we get a "leg" scene of her lifting her hemline to adjust her stocking and a brief scene of her in her slip after she's worn the kid's mother's negligee.  I'm not a big Monroe fan but she's decent here, stretching her acting muscles.  I like Richard Widmark and he plays a mostly sympathetic character (although he thinks he's going to have some sexy time with Marilyn until he realizes she's off her rocker).  Anne Bancroft plays a singer in the hotel lounge.  She sings a couple tunes (I don't know if she was dubbed or not but it did sound like it could be her voice) and is Richard's true love.  Noreen Corcoran, sister of Disney child actor Kevin and who used to be in the TV show BACHELOR FATHER, is the little girl in danger.  Not a great movie but there is some suspense and it's fairly fast-paced.

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Lawrence-thanks for your opinions about IT (2017). It's been so long since reading the story, I'll be seeing it "fresh" as you suggested. My only recollection is how incredibly good Tim Curry portrayed Pennywise in the first movie, it's burned in my brain. I'll give the new one a go, but am ready to scoff at the new clown portrayal.

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3 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

Lawrence-thanks for your opinions about IT (2017). It's been so long since reading the story, I'll be seeing it "fresh" as you suggested. My only recollection is how incredibly good Tim Curry portrayed Pennywise in the first movie, it's burned in my brain. I'll give the new one a go, but am ready to scoff at the new clown portrayal.

Yeah, I was too, as I'm a fan of Curry's, as well. I still liked Curry more, but Skarsgard does a good job. It's presented a bit differently, and the "unnaturalness" of Pennywise is pronounced, via camera angles and subtle CGI tricks.

By the way, the Skarsgard family is seemingly becoming the biggest acting family in Swedish history, it seems. Dad Stellan Skarsgard has been an international star for 40 years, brothers Alexander (True Blood) and Gustaf (Vikings) are TV and film stars, and now Bill as Pennywise. There appears to be one more, Valter Skarsgard, but he hasn't made much if any American stuff.

skarsgard-family.jpg

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8 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

Lawrence-thanks for your opinions about IT (2017). It's been so long since reading the story, I'll be seeing it "fresh" as you suggested. My only recollection is how incredibly good Tim Curry portrayed Pennywise in the first movie, it's burned in my brain. I'll give the new one a go, but am ready to scoff at the new clown portrayal.

Skarsgard's portrayal is good--and more importantly, better than Curry's in keeping with the book--it's just the new generation fanboy OBSESSION with the character, at the expense of King's metaphor, that I have problems with.  Given that so much of the fan zeitgeist at the moment seems to be centered around a decidedly subjective appreciation of 12-yo. kids with suburban-neighborhood bikes seeing scary things in the 80's (with all the "Stranger Things" fandom on Netflix, us real kids of the 80's have been telling the new "fake" ones, "Face it, you envy us..."), the It fandom seems to be treating the character as some independent Freddy Kruger--"When are we going to see his backstory?"--and not the book's metaphoric plot idea that the kids are seeing their fears.  Frankly, with so much pop nostalgia, I was surprised the director bothered to do the second Adult half of the book at all.

But, have to admit, director Andy Muschietti did a cracking job of creating a nightmare mood, when the kids see their fears--There are scenes that will literally have you saying "I've had ones like that.  :blink: "  King originally wrote the book because he wanted "the ultimate Universal monster bash", put the kids in his own 50's childhood and had them see the Teenage Wolfman and the Creature From the Black Lagoon, but with 80's kids, the director did a good job updating the imaginary monsters to real psychological fears instead.

11 hours ago, ChristineHoard said:

I watched Don't Bother to Knock on the Fox Movie Channel last night with Richard Widmark, Marilyn Monroe and, in her movie debut, Anne Bancroft plus a supporting cast full of familiar faces like Laurene Tuttle, Jim Backus and Elisha Cook, Jr.  It's early in Monroe's career (1952) and it's a dramatic role about a babysitter (Monroe) with mental problems. 

And the scary effectiveness of it is, she plays them a little too well.  :unsure:  From personal experience growing up, I'm guessing from her bio.

If this had come out in the 90's, it would be passed off as yet another Babysitter-From-Hell movie--but they didn't know what those were in the 40's, so they try to pass it off as "Film noir"--but show this to any fan who wants to symbolically diss Marilyn as a 50's-created dress-flipping airhead.  Her one note of breathy earnestness is absolutely creepy when turned evil.

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19 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

It (2017) - Slightly updated, partial retelling of Stephen King's massive tome, from New Line Cinema and director Andy Muschietti. It's 1988, and a group of young teens in the town of Derry, Maine are terrorized by an otherworldly clown named Pennywise (Bill Skarsgard), who can make them see their worst fears. They must band together to stop the fiend before it kills them all. Starring Jaeden Lieberher, Jeremy Ray Taylor, Sophia Lillis, Finn Wolfhard, Chosen Jacobs, Jack Dylan Grazer, Wyatt Oleff, Jackson Robert Scott, and Nicholas Hamilton. 

 

 

I saw this back when it first was released in theaters, and the clown (Pennywise) scared me so much that I had to sleep with the lights on for a week. I'm a huge wimp when it comes to "scary" movies (unless they were made in the 50s, then I can handle them). 

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