speedracer5

I Just Watched...

14,427 posts in this topic

26 minutes ago, CaveGirl said:

I love movies about people escaping from asylums

Because you can relate?

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks, Dark Blue! 

You remind me of a favorite saying in Latin:

"H-o-m-o sum humani a me nihil alienum p-u-t-o."
 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On the Avenue (1937) - Cacophonous musical rom-com from 20th Century-Fox and director Roy Del Ruth. Broadway singer/writer/showman Gary Blake (Dick Powell) unveils his newest show, On the Avenue. In it, he pokes fun at stuffy rich guy Commodore Caraway (George Barbier) and his spoiled society daughter Mimi (Madeleine Carroll). The incensed Mimi swears revenge, so she starts wooing Gary to try and get him to change his play, much to the annoyance to Gary's co-star and secret admirer Mona (Alice Faye). Also featuring Alan Mowbray, Cora Witherspoon, Walter Catlett, Douglas Fowley, Joan Davis, Stepin Fetchit, Sig Ruman, Billy Gilbert, E.E. Clive, Lynn Bari, and the Ritz Brothers as themselves.

This one was loud, with everyone pitched to the back row. I usually like Carroll, but she's not too appealing here, and [spoiler] she doesn't deserve to end up with Powell, which she does, while the more likable Faye gets left behind. Mowbray, Witherspoon, and Ruman are amusing, but I've always found the Ritz Brothers about as funny as eating a broken glass sandwich, and they get trotted out several times.  (5/10)

Source: Fox DVD. Bonus features include feature commentary, a 20-minute biography on Alice Faye, and a deleted scene with the Ritz Brothers. :(

on-the-avenue-movie-poster-1937-10102416

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

marcar said: I've always liked about Stanwyck, Davis and Loren is that they let themselves "look bad" for the appropriate character.

I realize "look bad" is in quotes, but I'd sure love to look as "bad" as any of those gals on an off day.
Actually, Davis' deep set eyes could easily translate as "hollow" by stark lighting, but Sophia Loren without make up & bad lighting still has a gorgeous, symmetrical face.
That is why she is still a beautiful "old lady" in much the same way as Maureen O'Hara and Ann Margaret.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have never understood why people always say that Bette Davis wasn't pretty.

Speaking of beauty, I'm watching The Enchanted Cottage. I wish they had chosen a plainer leading lady, since her lack of outer beauty is central to the plot. Dorothy McGuire may not be a Lana Turner, but she isn't "homely." Maybe they were afraid the audience couldn't warm to the character if she weren't at least somewhat pretty. Too bad, as the movie could have been much more powerful. I feel the same way about Mr. Skeffington. Bette Davis's ravaged appearance just doesn't come across to me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

On the Avenue (1937)

on-the-avenue-movie-poster-1937-10102416

We really differ on this one, Lawrence. I'm not that much of a fan of Fox musicals but On The Avenue is one of the few, especially from the '30s, that I do like. Dick Powell is quite amusing and Madeliene Carroll is engaging (spoiled brat that her character may be) and at the peak of her glamour. Even the Ritz Brothers, whom I normally abhor, I found to be fitfully amusing, for a change. Harry Ritz, in drag, spoofing "Let's Go Slummin'" had me chuckling quite a bit through his number, "subtle" as his humour may be.

But we agree, at least, about Alice Faye, this one of her final films before she would start to get top billing in major musical projects at the studio. Not only is she effective in her musical and comedy interludes, but, without that much help from the script, she exudes a warmth and vulnerability. Closeups of those large sad eyes in one or two scenes can speak volumes!

Billy Gilbert has a great bit as Nick, the exasperated owner of a small diner. The scene in which Powell and Carroll eat in his place is one of the best in the film, much of that thanks to the character funny man.

I would definitely recommend this one.

00392288.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
38 minutes ago, TikiSoo said:

marcar said: I've always liked about Stanwyck, Davis and Loren is that they let themselves "look bad" for the appropriate character.

I realize "look bad" is in quotes, but I'd sure love to look as "bad" as any of those gals on an off day.
Actually, Davis' deep set eyes could easily translate as "hollow" by stark lighting, but Sophia Loren without make up & bad lighting still has a gorgeous, symmetrical face.
That is why she is still a beautiful "old lady" in much the same way as Maureen O'Hara and Ann Margaret.

The discussion was about how they looked on screen as it relates to the character they were playing.

E.g Davis in Of Human Bondage.   When the character was about to die Davis asked that she look like she was about to die.   Even the director wondered if Davis should look as 'bad'  as she did in those final scenes.    We wondered if other actresses like Dietrich would have demanded that they still retain some degree of glamour, when NO degree of glamour is called for.

As for Davis;  I find her attractive;    

  image.jpeg.a236139d277f46d00ba3b233c8b00eaf.jpeg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/19/2018 at 8:39 PM, kingrat said:

So glad that others are discovering Deep Valley and loving it for exactly these reasons. Another poster, much missed in recent months, sent a PM about the same subject. I'd never heard of the film until someone who used to post here a few years back recommended it.

Just a note about The Bride Wore Red: Adrian designed some truly outrageous costumes for Joan Crawford for this film, and some might enjoy seeing it for this reason alone. I like the film a little better than Lawrence does, but it's not one of the first Crawford films you'd recommend to anyone.

 

I had not heard of this film before and loved it! Thanks for the heads up about it being on! (Deep Valley)

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
25 minutes ago, TomJH said:

I'm not that much of a fan of Fox musicals

I have a lot of them coming up over the next several years of movies in my "to watch" stacks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, LawrenceA said:

I have a lot of them coming up over the next several years of movies in my "to watch" stacks.

You have "stacks"? LOL Me, too. Let us know what ones are worth seeing as you get around to them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, calvinnme said:

I just watched "The Night Visitor" (1971) about a man, Salem (Max Von Sydow), sent to an insane asylum after being wrongfully convicted of the ax murder of a farm hand two years ago, who escapes at night to avenge himself of those that did him wrong by having a part in his imprisonment. And then somehow he lets himself back in without anybody at the asylum noticing.I never saw a location mentioned, but one imdb reviewer said it was Jutland, in Denmark.

It is obvious from the beginning what Salem is doing once he is loose - he is trying to pin the murders that he is committing  on the person he thinks actually committed the murder of the farm hand - Anton. But the police inspector (Trevor Howard) is having none of it. For one thing, Anton actually saw Salem in his house - Salem let the guy see him - so Anton would sound crazy when he talked to the inspector. Why would Anton make up this particular story, casting blame on a man who is locked up? And this has the inspector visiting the asylum to see if it would be possible for Salem to escape and then get back in, and it looks pretty impossible and yet...his doubts linger because he does not arrest Anton in spite of having plenty of evidence.

This little thriller was pretty unique despite some implausibilities and some linguistic problems. Why is the asylum so close to the homes of the village in which Salem lived? How is he able to run through the woods for what looks like a few miles in his underwear in sub freezing weather without freezing to death? Wouldn't all of this been easier for Salem in the summertime?  Why does half the cast sound Swedish and the other half sound British? In spite of this I really enjoyed this unique little film. And the final irony of the film is delightful. I'd give it 8/10.

Source: TCM Underground

 

What a strange movie this was! I had never heard of it. I wonder if it had much of a release in the U.S.??? I was a huge Liv Ullmann fan at the time, so odd I dont remember it.

 

I know. There were a lot of logic lapses in the storyline (you could see where it was heading) the biggest being how Max could survive out there in his undies in that kind of weather. Seemed half the film was him running around trying to get in and out of places. I'm glad I watched it, but wouldnt again. Mancini's score seemed derivative of his Wait Until Dark score a few years before.........

 

I thought the film would end with Howard waiting in Max's cell for him. But the ending they used was pretty good too!

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Prince and the Pauper (1937) - Rousing family adventure based on Mark Twain's story, from Warner Brothers and director William Keighley. In 1537 England, Prince Edward (Robert Mauch) meets poor street urchin Tom Canty (Billy Mauch) and they are both amazed at their physical resemblance. After they each dress up as the other, events transpire that find Tom confused by the royal court as Edward, while the real Edward ends up in the slums where Tom came from. Sneaky courtier Earl of Hertford (Claude Rains) discovers the mix-up and decides to utilize the switch to gain the throne, while the real Edward runs into former soldier Miles Hendon (Errol Flynn) who becomes the boy's protector. Also featuring Barton MacLane, Henry Stephenson, Alan Hale, Eric Portman, Halliwell Hobbes, Fritz Leiber, Elspeth Dudgeon, Robert Warwick, Ian Wolfe, and Montagu Love as Henry VIII.

Embroidered with a good score by Erich Wolfgang Korngold, this is a fine example of a family film that doesn't talk down to its audience and which should appeal to kids and adults alike. With Flynn, Hale and Rains, this seems like a dry run for the next year's Robin Hood. Claude Rains, in his all-black finery, reminded me of Black Adder. When Flynn, who isn't onscreen enough, finally gets his hands on dirty Bart MacLane, it's a very satisfying movie moment. Recommended.   (8/10)

Source: TCM.

hqdefault.jpg

d1c871fa6bed0cb7270c8c9ccec4a626--errol-

  • Like 3
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, CaveGirl said:

I just watched...well, not "just" like in the last hour and a half, but more than 12 or more hours ago, a great movie called "The Corpse Grinders". This was directed by Ted V. Mikels, and the V stands for Vincent, as in Vincent Van Gogh or maybe Vincent Van Patten, as you prefer.

The storyline is convoluted. A guy [who kind of looks like Bobby Goldsboro or maybe a young George Segal] has a buddy [who doesn't look like anyone much] and they go into business making cat food and incorporate as Lotus Cat Food Incorporated. Problem...they don't have the ingredients to really make food for felines, so they begin using dead bodies to put into the grinder. I loved the shots down in the factory in front of the grinding apparatus, because it was so colorfully shot, with great red and green filters, a lot like a Star Trek episode. There is a doctor named Glass, who is cute and looks like Robert Horton mixed with a bit of Tom Selleck, and maybe J.D. Salinger had something to do with the screenplay since he always used the Glass family in most of his writings.

I think this is a cautionary tale, much in the spirit of someone like Upton Sinclair and his exposes like "The Jungle" showing how cats are not man's best friend and will turn on you and rip your throat out, for just about anything. Don't blame the cat food since I doubt Kuru would be the diagnosis by any trained epidem...epidemo... uh, stomach doctor. What I mostly enjoyed watching was all the great zooms [which would make Mario Bava so envious!] and I bet the cinematographer went on to some really prestige films after this stirring flick.

Oh, there are a few partial nude scenes like when the wife [who looks like she could be either Lulu's mother or Pat Carroll in a red wig] of the mortician guy brings in some girl, whose breasts look like they were made out of silly putty with dents, and when Doctor Glass's nurse is put on the grinder Wabac machine, but all in all they are done quite tastefully. Not as good as Mikel's "Astro-Zombies" and maybe needed a shot of Tura Satana but all in all a wonderful film.

Check out Eating Raoul for some laughs along similar lines. :lol:

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, cigarjoe said:

Check out Eating Raoul for some laughs along similar lines. :lol:

OMG! I love the film "Eating Raoul", CigarJoe.

That guy in it was doing such a good Eric Estrada imitation also that made it even funnier.

The real joy of the film also, is the amazing Mid-Century Modern in the couple's apartment! Thanks.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/18/2018 at 10:49 PM, CinemaInternational said:

Trio again....

Twice in a Lifetime (1985) is a film that tries to be neat and tidy about a messy subject. That is not a good trait to have. It just feels too contained, that there normally would be permanent fallout after a man would leave his devoted wife for another woman , not just temporarily as the film would have it. As a result, the film fails to fully convince. The performances are tip-top all across the board though.

Two Women (1960) Searing, brutal, magnificent. Sophia Loren is excellent in her Oscar-winning role, and the rest of the film is very finely wrought all the way through.

Deep Valley (1947) was a gem, so  tender and moving. Ida Lupino was superb, and the film was deeply affecting and wonderful.

 

I agree. Deep Valley was excellent! So glad someone mentioned it being on, as I had not heard of this film before...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i watched a trio of movies recently that inspired me to get back to posting.

 

DEEP VALLEY- 1947- A Warner Bros joint with Ida Lupino, kind of NOW, VOYAGER meets HIGH SIERRA if that helps those of you who have not seen it get the gyst of what it's about plotwise- a  repressed "girl" (Ida is supposed to be 22, snort) living with her superfun mom and dad in an isolated Valley in Northern California hides out a convict and falls in love with him. Jean Negulesco directs and it's a template for JOHNNY BELINDA (which came next year) in many, many ways, right down to the MARVELOUS cinematography and all the wonderful shadows of gnarled branches that cast over the character's faces throughout. I am bad- I admit- about not watching a movie, the lovely black and white photography- which shone through the dullness of the negative- is still stunning. Ida is great in this (although, really, we couldn't do a rewrite to make the character 30?) , so are Fay BAINTER as her mother- who has been stricken with a case of "White Woman Syndrome" where she can't do **** for herself, and Henry Hull as the father- who maybe gives the film's best performance, it's really great work.

 

THE GUILT OF JANET AMES (1947)- tHANKS to KINGRAT for recommending this and the aforementioned DEEP VALLEY, both were on TCM ON DEMAND, which was nice (no issues with sync and i could pause if i needed to wander as i am prone to do) this was a kooky movie, but so 1947- a film whose "feel" is all psychology and DARKNESS and dreaminess. as soon as it references PETER IBBETSON, it had me. (for the record, if you ever get the chance to see the 1935 version of IBBETSON with Cooper and Ann  Harding- DO SO) While the script was clever and Melvyn Douglas damned sturdy as a lead, I could not help but feel as though ROZ RUSSELL was misdirected (as were other elements of the movie.) she plays the part too glam and a lot of her moments don't seem genuine- still, a mannered and inexplicably well-coiffed and made-up Roz is still fun to watch.

 

CLUNY BROWN- 1946- how can i put into words a film that is impossible to put into words? Especially when I haven't been putting anything into words AT ALL of late. This film is perfection. Confection. A marvelous oddity. A complete delight. I guffawed numerous times. It is how I verymuch see the world- and how I would like verymuch for the world to be. it is everything a film should be. Jennifer Jones could power several blocks with her luminous qualities and Boyer's work in this made him one of my al-time favorites. it is still on (my) TCM ON DEMAND (or at least it was a couple hours ago) and THERE IS NO FILM ON EARTH THAT I COULD POSSIBLY RECOMMEND MORE HIGHLY THAN IT. J'adore it from start to finish.

 

All right. I'm tired.

I haven't done this in a while. my hands are clumsy. \ signing off for now.

apologies for the four dozen factual errors i'm sure i made.

missed you guys (well, most of you)

let the National Nightmare resume,

Mama's Back.

  • Like 9
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm glad I chose The Enchanted Cottage for tonight. This movie, as most reviewers point out, could have been SO much better; however, it has an interesting theme that hasn't been dealt with very often in the movies: the fact that love makes people more beautiful to each other. The two main characters (Robert Young and Dorothy McGuire) each consider themselves to be ugly and unlovable, but through love they find beauty in one another. The corniness is laid on heavily, but you must do as the characters do and see your way past this movie's flaws.

I love Mildred Natwick, who plays the cottage caretaker, and I'm sure even the great Ethel Barrymore would have hammed up the part she was given (what else can you do when you have to be prophetic and hint at your tragic, lonely past in the first few minutes?)...still, I wonder what someone like Edna May Oliver would have done with that part. Oh well. I'm not going to pick at the movie. I enjoyed it, it gave me all the romance I was looking for, plus I got to hang out with some nice people played by Herbert Marshall, Robert Young, Dorothy McGuire, and Mildred Natwick in a charming cottage with a fire and tea...there was even a rainy night to enjoy.

Exciting it's not, but it's sweet and has atmosphere.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

 

CLUNY BROWN- 1946- how can i put into words a film that is impossible to put into words? Especially when I haven't been putting anything into words AT ALL of late. This film is perfection. Confection. A marvelous oddity. A complete delight. I guffawed numerous times. It is how I verymuch see the world- and how I would like verymuch for the world to be. it is everything a film should be. Jennifer Jones could power several blocks with her luminous qualities and Boyer's work in this made him one of my al-time favorites. it is still on (my) TCM ON DEMAND (or at least it was a couple hours ago) and THERE IS NO FILM ON EARTH THAT I COULD POSSIBLY RECOMMEND MORE HIGHLY THAN IT. J'adore it from start to finish.

Wow, I'll put it on my must-watch list!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
41 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

The Prince and the Pauper (1937)

 

d1c871fa6bed0cb7270c8c9ccec4a626--errol-

For a while after this film was released some of Flynn's friends gave him the nickname "Princey." His light hearted charm and, at times, slightly mocking manner is perfect for a rather slow moving film like this and, yes, he certainly isn't in the film enough.

When I was at an old paper show some years ago I picked up the above photo you posted, Lawrence, signed by both Mauch brothers. There's probably not much demand for this sort of item but I suspect it's fairly rare.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

The Prince and the Pauper (1937) - Rousing family adventure based on Mark Twain's story, from Warner Brothers and director William Keighley. In 1537 England, Prince Edward (Robert Mauch) meets poor street urchin Tom Canty (Billy Mauch) and they are both amazed at their physical resemblance. After they each dress up as the other, events transpire that find Tom confused by the royal court as Edward, while the real Edward ends up in the slums where Tom came from. Sneaky courtier Earl of Hertford (Claude Rains) discovers the mix-up and decides to utilize the switch to gain the throne, while the real Edward runs into former soldier Miles Hendon (Errol Flynn) who becomes the boy's protector. Also featuring Barton MacLane, Henry Stephenson, Alan Hale, Eric Portman, Halliwell Hobbes, Fritz Leiber, Elspeth Dudgeon, Robert Warwick, Ian Wolfe, and Montagu Love as Henry VIII.

Embroidered with a good score by Erich Wolfgang Korngold, this is a fine example of a family film that doesn't talk down to its audience and which should appeal to kids and adults alike. With Flynn, Hale and Rains, this seems like a dry run for the next year's Robin Hood. Claude Rains, in his all-black finery, reminded me of Black Adder. When Flynn, who isn't onscreen enough, finally gets his hands on dirty Bart MacLane, it's a very satisfying movie moment. Recommended.   (8/10)

Source: TCM.

hqdefault.jpg

d1c871fa6bed0cb7270c8c9ccec4a626--errol-

While I like this film, everytime I watch it, I think: "This film needs more Flynn and less 'Prince and Pauper.' " I know that the film is called The Prince and the Pauper, but I got tired of the Mauch Twins very quickly.  The giggling became annoying.  If only Flynn had been about ten-fifteen years longer, maybe he could have played the title roles.  That's something that Flynn never did in his career and should have: played twins.  Two Errol Flynns in the same film? ::swoon:: The only time that that ever came close to happening is in the blooper in The Adventures of Don Juan where they reused footage from The Private Lives of Elizabeth and Essex and 1939 Errol Flynn is in the front of the pack leading 1948 Errol Flynn through England. 

 

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Quality Street (1937) - Ridiculous romantic trifle based on a J.M. Barrie play, from RKO and director George Stevens. Katharine Hepburn stars as Phoebe Throssel, an unmarried young woman in England during the Napoleonic Wars, a time when eligible bachelors were few and far between. She's got her sites on handsome Dr. Valentine Brown (Franchot Tone), but instead of proposing marriage, he joins the army and leaves for the war. Many years pass as Phoebe and her sister Susan (Fay Bainter) run a school, and when Doc Brown returns, he hardly recognizes the "weathered" Phoebe. She's incensed, and decides to clean up nice and present herself as her own, younger niece. Will this ruse win Doc's affections? Yeesh. Also featuring Eric Blore, Cora Witherspoon, Estelle Winwood, Bonita Granville, Florence Lake, Helena Grant, and Joan Fontaine.

The ludicrous dual identity premise may have worked better on stage, but on film it doesn't fly. The good supporting cast is largely wasted. I am not the intended audience for this type of film, nor was I in the mood for it.  (5/10)

Source: TCM.

8731.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Re-watched My Dream is Yours (1949) last night from the TCM Mobile app. I love Doris Day, Jack Carson, and Eve Arden. Jack and Eve are both hilarious, and Doris' voice is nothing short of wonderful, as per usual. Upon rewatching this film, I was again struck by how sweet it is. It's definitely not a masterpiece in any sense of the word, but it's thoroughly enjoyable if you're in the mood for something lighthearted. 

Also, I know Speedy will appreciate this: Duncan Richardson, who played Doris' young son, Freddie, was refreshing in the sense that he wasn't another one of those line-screamer child actors (I'm looking at you, Richie Petrie). He was adorable. 

Related image

Image result for my dream is yours 1949

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 minutes ago, NickAndNora34 said:

Re-watched My Dream is Yours (1949) last night from the TCM Mobile app. I love Doris Day, Jack Carson, and Eve Arden. Jack and Eve are both hilarious, and Doris' voice is nothing short of wonderful, as per usual. Upon rewatching this film, I was again struck by how sweet it is. It's definitely not a masterpiece in any sense of the word, but it's thoroughly enjoyable if you're in the mood for something lighthearted. 

Also, I know Speedy will appreciate this: Duncan Richardson, who played Doris' young son, Freddie, was refreshing in the sense that he wasn't another one of those line-screamer child actors (I'm looking at you, Richie Petrie). He was adorable. 

Yes I remember this film.  This is the one with Doris Day, Jack Carson and Bugs Bunny right? I always get this film mixed up with the one she did with Danny Thomas, I'll See You in My Dreams.  

Day has such a calming presence on screen and she has a beautiful voice.  Carson is a very underrated performer.  He always brings so much to his roles, no matter how big or small the part is.  Eve Arden is also very underrated and is always fantastic.  She and Carson seem to be paired up a lot.  Or maybe it's just my imagination, but they're also in Mildred Pierce together.  

It's always refreshing when a film does not feature a "Ritchie Petrie" type kid.  Ugh. I just watched The Dick Van Dyke Show the other day, and there was Ritchie.  Screaming again.  Why Dick Van Dyke, Mary Tyler Moore, Rose Marie, Carl Reiner, anybody couldn't just tell that kid to speak at a normal speaking level is beyond me.  I know not every kid can be Ron Howard, but even Little Ricky from I Love Lucy was better than Ritchie.  The kids from The Brady Bunch are infinitely better than Ritchie.  I am just glad that Ritchie was more of a background character and the plots didn't focus on him very often. Rob and Laura seemed to send Ritchie to bed a lot, probably because he was so irritating. At least Tabitha from Bewitched, while being a little precocious for my taste, at least she had magic powers! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rhythm in the Clouds (1937) - Substandard musical comedy from Republic Pictures and director John H. Auer. Struggling songwriter Judy Walker (Patricia Ellis) can't pay her rent, so she forges a letter allowing her to occupy a ritzy apartment while the owner is out of town. She just happens have a next door neighbor that's a gifted lyricist, Bob McKay (Warren Hull). The two annoy each other with their noise making, but they never see each other, so they don't know that the other is the annoying neighbor when they both start working for the same radio show, become collaborators, and start to develop a romance. Also featuring William Newell, Richard Carle, Zeffie Tilbury, Charles Judels, Robert Paige, Joyce Compton, Suzanne Kaaren, and Esther Howard.

Bland, uninspired, unfunny, and with unmemorable songs, this a pure time-waster.  (4/10)

Source: Mill Creek DVD, part of the 50 Classic Musicals box set.

39320_rhythm-in-the-clouds.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

New Members:

Register Here

Learn more about the new message boards:

FAQ

Having problems?

Contact Us