speedracer5

I Just Watched...

10,049 posts in this topic

Last night "Sabotage" (1936) was on WHUT, a PBS station based out of Howard University in Washington, D.C. It was my first time to see it. It was in a failed DVD set put out by Fox a few years back, mainly failing because the DVDs were defective from the factory, but I digress. The film is about a group of saboteurs planning to plant a bomb in London. However, there is an undercover cop that is on their trail, and as part of his job he befriends the wife (Sylvia Sidney) of one of the saboteurs. Not as part of his job, he falls in love with her. Sidney's character has no idea that her husband is up to any kind of criminal activity. Hitchcock seems to foresee WWII with some of his themes, and he lets a horrible thing happen to one of the main characters after making the audience really care about this completely innocent person. It has an ending that would not be possible in America at the time because of the code, and the ending is just full of irony.

An interesting thing that WHUT did after the film was have the host discuss the film with some film students, I assume from Howard U. They had pretty good insights for three college students, but I could tell they had trouble relating to a film from 82 years ago, even if it was Hitchcock.  I have a feeling that if they had been discussing this year's Oscar nominees they would have been much more chatty. The host was good, but he dressed oddly. He had a hat on like he was from the 1940s or something. The best way I can describe him is that if you tried to visualize Eddie Mulller's dad, chances are, you'd picture this guy.

A pleasurable  classic film experience for me that, for once, was not courtesy of TCM.

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mr. Wong in Chinatown (1939) - Third in the series of mysteries from Monogram Pictures and director William Nigh. When a Chinese princess is murdered in his drawing room, brilliant San Francisco detective James Lee Wong (Boris Karloff) is determined to find the culprit. He has assistance from local police Inspector Street (Grant Withers), and plucky reporter Bobby Logan (Marjorie Reynolds). The case involves weapon sales to help the Chinese fight the Japanese back in China. Also featuring Huntley Gordon, Bessie Loo, Richard Loo, George Lynn, William Royle, James Flavin, Lotus Long, and Angelo Rossitto.

This was the third of five Mr. Wong films starring Karloff in the title role (there was a sixth Wong film with Keye Luke in the lead), and the only one I hadn't seen. They were Monogram's much cheaper answer to the successful Charlie Chan and Mr. Moto movies. Karloff spends a lot of time in the background in this one, with Withers and Reynolds seemingly getting more screen time. The mystery is dull and uninvolving, and the performances serviceable at best. The only highlight was a strange, brief bit with dwarf actor Angelo Rossitto as a mute Chinese guy in bad makeup. He looks more like a Mexican bandido than a Chinese peasant.  (5/10)

Source: Amazon Prime.

0a7e2eeb809516bf8708734d22c12e89.jpg

59655709a65cf28da41b713c84ccb45d.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Never Say Die (1939) - Mild comedy from Paramount Pictures and director Elliott Nugent. Bob Hope stars as John Kidley, the hypochondriac heir to the Kidley fortune (his grandfather invented the kidney bean). While convalescing at an exclusive Alpine health spa, he meets American cattle heiress Mickey Hawkins (Martha Raye). Jim is being pursued by homicidal gold-digger Juno (Gale Sondergaard), while Mickey is being forced by her father to wed nobleman Prince Smirnov (Alan Mowbray), despite her desire to marry bus driver Henry Munch (Andy Devine) back home. So Jim and Mickey decide to marry each other, as Jim has been told he hasn't long to live, and when he dies, Mickey can inherit his fortune which will allow her to then marry Henry. But of course things don't according to plan. Also featuring Sig Ruman, Ernest Cossart, Paul Harvey, Frances Arms, Monty Woolley, Hobart Cavanaugh, Albert Dekker, Hans Conried, and Gustav von Seyffertitz.

Typical stuff from Hope and Raye, although I have to say Raye keeps her shouting to a minimum. Devine is amusing, and I always enjoy Sondergaard. I had never heard of this one before, and while I wouldn't say it was bad, I can see why it's been largely forgotten.  (6/10)

Source: Universal DVD, part of the Bob Hope: Classic Comedy Collection.

hope-raye.jpg?w=514&h=391

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Old Maid (1939) - Period-piece melodrama based on the acclaimed play by Zoe Akins, from Warner Brothers and director Edmund Goulding. Delia Lovell (Miriam Hopkins) is set to be married, but on the day of the ceremony, she learns that old beau Clem (George Brent) is returning to town. Delia's cousin Charlotte (Bette Davis) is sent to intercept him and break the bad news. Charlotte and Clem "console" one another, with unintended consequences for both Charlotte and Delia for years to come. Also featuring Donald Crisp, Jane Bryan, Louise Fazenda, James Stephenson, Jerome Cowan, William Lundigan, Cecilia Loftus, William Hopper, Rand Brooks, Janet Shaw, and Doris Lloyd.

This is a soap opera-esque showcase for Davis and Hopkins, who notoriously disliked each other, which only helps their performances here. They try to outdo each other, but in my opinion Davis comes out on top, seeming to give her all for her role, deglamorized and often unlikable, but only as the script calls for it, whereas Hopkins seems more reluctant to "go ugly" in either appearance or demeanor. Everyone else in the cast isn't much more than an onlooker, although I liked Donald Crisp is an unusually warm turn as a kindly family doctor.  (7/10)

Source: TCM.

old-maid-trio.jpg

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
32 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

The Old Maid (1939) - Period-piece melodrama based on the acclaimed play by Zoe Akins, from Warner Brothers and director Edmund Goulding. Delia Lovell (Miriam Hopkins) is set to be married, but on the day of the ceremony, she learns that old beau Clem (George Brent) is returning to town. Delia's cousin Charlotte (Bette Davis) is sent to intercept him and break the bad news. Charlotte and Clem "console" one another, with unintended consequences for both Charlotte and Delia for years to come. Also featuring Donald Crisp, Jane Bryan, Louise Fazenda, James Stephenson, Jerome Cowan, William Lundigan, Cecilia Loftus, William Hopper, Rand Brooks, Janet Shaw, and Doris Lloyd.

This is a soap opera-esque showcase for Davis and Hopkins, who notoriously disliked each other, which only helps their performances here. They try to outdo each other, but in my opinion Davis comes out on top, seeming to give her all for her role, deglamorized and often unlikable, but only as the script calls for it, whereas Hopkins seems more reluctant to "go ugly" in either appearance or demeanor. Everyone else in the cast isn't much more than an onlooker, although I liked Donald Crisp is an unusually warm turn as a kindly family doctor.  (7/10)

Source: TCM.

old-maid-trio.jpg

 

It is a good film, though truth be told I found Hopkins' character could be just as bitter, spiteful and unlikable as Davis' at times.

(SPOILER ALERT) Hopkins ruins Davis' last chance to avoid becoming 'The Old Maid', I think more to get back at her for bedding the man  that Hopkins chose NOT to marry, and then had his child, than out of real consideration for the man Davis now wanted to marry at the time. 

And I think it gave Hopkins some satisfaction that she was able to raise and spoil the love child (Jane Bryan) of Davis and Brent have that daughter worship her and rebel against Davis, whom Bryan believes hasn't the least bit experience with being in love. Davis' bitterness, while perhaps she did go overboard with it at times, at least it's understandable, it cannot be easy watching someone else claim your child as their own, though in this case, Davis is a bit more fortunate than most as she is at least living in close quarters with her.

Still, Hopkins does end up doing the right thing and reveals the truth to 'her' daughter in the end, so I can't say she was beyond being selfless. One can only hope that maybe Davis and Bryan can finally find a way to resolve their differences and find a way to bond.

As you said, the real life dislike between Davis and Hopkins actually does add to the film (likewise the feud between Davis and Joan Crawford in WHAT EVER HAPPENED TO BABY JANE? actually made the film the classic that it is today). It might not be the best performance from either actress, but the two of them actually do give it their all, so I say 7/10 it just about right for this movie.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Paradise in Harlem (1939) - Musical drama from Jubilee Pictures and director Joseph Seiden. Frank H. Wilson stars as Lem Anderson, an actor stuck in the black vaudeville circuit who longs for work in the legitimate theater. When he witnesses a mob murder, the gangsters first kill his wife before chasing him out of town. He heads south where he becomes a hopeless drunk. After some old stage friends find him in a bar, they help rehabilitate him just in time for the lead role in a production of Othello back in Harlem. But his return brings the attention of the mobsters once again. Also featuring Mamie Smith, Norman Astwood, Norma Mae Harris, Merritt Smith, and Francine Everett.

This all-black production is a nice historic snapshot of a lesser-seen side of show business at the time. There are several musical numbers and comedy fade out bits shown as part of the various stage productions, and they don't differ too drastically from their white counterparts, except perhaps for the amount of soul in the singing. Modern viewers may be surprised to see that Wilson (who also wrote the script) has a stage act in blackface. That's right, black actors played in exaggerated blackface, too. One bit of dialogue was news to me: apparently peanuts bring bad luck if brought back stage to a theater.   (5/10)

Source: Mill Creek DVD, part of the 50 Classic Musicals box set.

lrgpic29.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I watched HIGH SIERRA tonight, one of Humphrey Bogart's movies in 1941 that helped to send him on the way to stardom (the other being THE MALTESE FALCON) at long last.

Bogey plays Roy Earle, a recently pardoned convict, and it doesn't take long for him to get back into a life of crime once he's back on the outside. However, he does come across and befriend an folksy family on the way and even falls for the disabled granddaughter (Joan Leslie).

Ida Lupino, however, is his female partner-in-crime Marie, and the only one who actually truly understands him.

Okay (SPOILERS coming)....I suppose I could argue that maybe Roy saw a last chance to really try to go straight when he tries to woo Joan (after pulling the big heist of course), but has pretty much resigned himself to his criminal ways when he sees how the operation that he arranged for her to have to correct her physical ailment, has drastically changed her. 

Of course, there can be no happy ending for Roy and Marie (they were criminals after all, and no criminals were allowed any happy endings in the era of the Production Code). 

Cute dog, though, even if he really DID seem to bring bad luck to everyone he came in contact with (including the two people who grew very fond of him).

Another winner from Raoul Walsh, who also demonstrated his versatility with THE STRAWBERRY BLONDE that came out the same year, a sweet-natured, sentimental comedy that was as different from HIGH SIERRA as night is to day.

Walsh has been credited for bringing out the best in Cagney, with THE ROARING TWENTIES, WHITE HEAT and of course THE STRAWBERRY BLONDE. I agree with that, but one could also make the argument that he also helped bring out the dynamics in Bogart that would make him a star in his own right.

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Never Say Die (1939) 

Typical stuff from Hope and Raye, although I have to say Raye keeps her shouting to a minimum. Devine is amusing, and I always enjoy Sondergaard. I had never heard of this one before, and while I wouldn't say it was bad, I can see why it's been largely forgotten.  (6/10)

Source: Universal DVD, part of the Bob Hope: Classic Comedy Collection.

This is honestly one of the first older movies I remember watching during my re-immersion into old movies. I could not tell you what this movie was about without reading your synopsis; you are correct, it certainly is forgettable. I didn't hate it, but we can't all be The Thin Man or Bringing up Baby. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 minutes ago, Bethluvsfilms said:

I watched HIGH SIERRA tonight, one of Humphrey Bogart's movies

If you haven't seen it, you should also check out I Died a Thousand Times (1955), a remake of High Sierra starring Jack Palance, Shelley Winters, Lee Marvin, Lon Chaney Jr., and Dennis Hopper. I won't say that it's better (it's not!), but it's not bad, and makes for an interesting comparison.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
55 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

If you haven't seen it, you should also check out I Died a Thousand Times (1955), a remake of High Sierra starring Jack Palance, Shelley Winters, Lee Marvin, Lon Chaney Jr., and Dennis Hopper. I won't say that it's better (it's not!), but it's not bad, and makes for an interesting comparison.

And let's not forget Colorado Territory, Raoul Walsh's western take on High Sierra. Joel McCrea and Virginia Mayo are featured and the ending is a variation of High Sierra's but some could argue that it's even better. Certainly it's a very effective climax.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Raffles (1939) - Light entertainment cat-and-mouse caper from United Artists, producer Samuel Goldwyn, and director Sam Wood (with uncredited help from William Wyler). David Niven stars as Raffles, a gentleman cricket champion and part-time cat burglar known to the police only as the Amateur Cracksman. His brazen string of high-profile robberies has earned him the ire of dogged Scotland Yard inspector MacKenzie (Dudley Digges) who won;t stop until his man is caught. Also starring Olivia de Havilland as Raffles's unaware love interest, Dame May Whitty, Douglas Walton, E.E. Clive, Lionel Pape, Peter Godfrey, and Gilbert Emery.

This is a direct remake of the 1930 film of the same name, that one starring Ronald Colman, Kay Francis and David Torrence. I liked that one just a bit more, but this one is well worth seeing, too. Niven is smooth, charming and playful, making crime look like fun, while longtime character actor Digges has one of his best roles as the sharp policeman. Olivia de Havilland doesn't have a lot to do, but she looks terrific, and she has a few nice reaction scenes. The biggest flaw in this version is the very end, a truncated mess that was ordered by the Production Code. Niven left to join the British Army immediately after filming this, and didn't return to U.S. films until 7 years later.  (7/10)

Source: TCM.

MOV_8a67084b_b.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Typical stuff from Hope and Raye, although I have to say Raye keeps her shouting to a minimum. Devine is amusing, and I always enjoy Sondergaard. I had never heard of this one before, and while I wouldn't say it was bad, I can see why it's been largely forgotten.


I recently watched this on Youtube (beautiful print..too bad the bottom is cut off..) and I think I liked it a little more than you.  Hope as a hypochondriac is perfectly cast to make use of his familiar'coward' character, and even the co-stars, Sondergaard, Devine, Mowbray, Monty Wooley--were great fits. I did think the clever dialogue at the start got a little sluggish toward the middle, but improved with the ending..The whole 'cross on the handle of the pistol with the bullet' routine was obviously the 'inspiration' for Danny Kaye's 'vessel with the pestle' bit.  I also thought the chemistry between  (yes, more 'sedated') Martha Raye and Hope was pretty good, they just seem comfortable with one another..much better outing for the two than Give Me A Sailor the year before.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

The Old Maid (1939) - Period-piece melodrama based on the acclaimed play by Zoe Akins, from Warner Brothers and director Edmund Goulding. Delia Lovell (Miriam Hopkins) is set to be married, but on the day of the ceremony, she learns that old beau Clem (George Brent) is returning to town. Delia's cousin Charlotte (Bette Davis) is sent to intercept him and break the bad news. Charlotte and Clem "console" one another, with unintended consequences for both Charlotte and Delia for years to come. Also featuring Donald Crisp, Jane Bryan, Louise Fazenda, James Stephenson, Jerome Cowan, William Lundigan, Cecilia Loftus, William Hopper, Rand Brooks, Janet Shaw, and Doris Lloyd.

This is a soap opera-esque showcase for Davis and Hopkins, who notoriously disliked each other, which only helps their performances here. They try to outdo each other, but in my opinion Davis comes out on top, seeming to give her all for her role, deglamorized and often unlikable, but only as the script calls for it, whereas Hopkins seems more reluctant to "go ugly" in either appearance or demeanor. Everyone else in the cast isn't much more than an onlooker, although I liked Donald Crisp is an unusually warm turn as a kindly family doctor.  (7/10)

Source: TCM.

old-maid-trio.jpg

 

I enjoyed the "melodrama" aspect of this, just the right touch to appear "operatic." I was sufficiently interested in the story not to have noticed that anyone was trying to out do anyone else  ;). Bette was better but she doesn't win anything. (Compare Old Acquaintance, where Davis is splendidly level headed versus Hopkins ultra ridiculous over=the-top histrionics. Bette wins that one hands down. ha.) The look on Bette's face when learning of betrayal was extremely good (sitting on the couch). A precursor of the method it seemed to mean to me, so to speak. (Note: aficionados can react to this: in both films the early scenes seemed arbitrarily reeled up to go faster in order to generate exhilaration not only for the characters but perhaps for the audience as well. I'm surely wrong about this but geez those people were moving fast.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Bethluvsfilms said:

Cute dog [High Sierra], though, even if he really DID seem to bring bad luck to everyone he came in contact with (including the two people who grew very fond of him).

Noir's first canine fatale?

:P

  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/10/2018 at 2:10 PM, LawrenceA said:

Idiot's Delight (1939) - Wartime anxiety and drama with some light comedy, based on the Pulitzer Prize-winning play by Robert E. Sherwood, from MGM and director Clarence Brown. At an Alpine resort in a European border town, a motley assortment of characters are stuck after news of possible war causes the borders to close. Among them are American showman Harry (Clark Gable) and his "7 Blondes", a bevy of song-and-dance beauties; wealthy businessman Weber (Edward Arnold) and his companion, the haughty Irene (Norma Shearer); German physician Dr. Waldersee (Charles Coburn); high-strung Quillery (Burgess Meredith); and local military officer Captain Kirvline (Jospeh Schildkraut). Harry is certain that Irene is someone he knew years earlier, something she denies, but with war getting closer and bombers in the air, it may not matter. Also featuring Laura Hope Crews, "Skeets" Gallagher, Peter Willes, Pat Patterson, William Edmunds, Hobart Cavanaugh, Frank Faylen, Virginia Grey, Virginia Dale, and Fritz Feld.

This was a mixed-bag for me. I liked Gable, and seeing him in his one and only song and dance performance was fun. I liked seeing Burgess Meredith and Charles Coburn. And the setting is interesting. But Shearer is just awful, doing a terribly exaggerated accent complete with florid arm gestures and "comical" mock-theatrical over-emoting. Shearer is said to have been parodying Greta Garbo, but it only comes across as irritating. The version shown featured both alternate endings to the movie.   (6/10)

Source: TCM. My recording of it is old enough to have a Robert Osborne intro, which was nice to see.

1939posteridiotsdelight.jpg

I liked her as the Contessa. Maybe it's because I'm under the impression that she's putting on an act for ClarkG who she remembers well enough. She looked like she was enjoying the role and I liked the way she hammed it up. Even that big oft phony sounding belly laugh.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/10/2018 at 4:43 PM, LawrenceA said:

In Name Only (1939) - Soapy melodrama from RKO and director John Cromwell. Widow Julie Eden (Carole Lombard) meets nice guy Alec Walker (Cary Grant) and the two fall in love. The only problem is that Alec is currently married to Maida (Kay Francis) who is determined to stay married to Alec despite their being no love between them, as she enjoys his family's money and prestige. Also featuring Charles Coburn, Helen Vinson, Katharine Alexander, Jonathan Hale, Nella Walker, Alan Baxter, Maurice Moscovitch, Grady Sutton, and Peggy Ann Garner.

Lombard plays it straight in this effective romantic tearjerker, and she's good, as is Grant, who gets a few nice one-liners. Kay Francis and Helen Vinson seem to be in a contest for most detestable actress of 1939, and I'm a bit disappointed that Carole didn't sock either of them in the jaw.  (7/10)

Source: TCM.

30072-in-name-only-0-230-0-345-crop.jpg?

Most memorable to me is that lovely opener at the lake. Very breezy scene and ... natural. Wonderful to watch Carole here. She goes fishing but meets a guy with a sandwich. I like Kay Francis but was she miscast? She was bizarre in an attempt at acid coldness.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, laffite said:

Most memorable to me is that lovely opener at the lake. Very breezy scene and ... natural. Wonderful to watch Carole here. She goes fishing but meets a guy with a sandwich. I like Kay Francis but was she miscast? She was bizarre in an attempt at acid coldness.

Kay Francis does seem like an odd choice.  However, after having recently watched several of her earliest performances from '29 through '31 or so, where she often played vamps and villainesses, I knew that she had that capability. I thought she was good and believable as the heartless wife in this movie. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, Bethluvsfilms said:

Cute dog, though, even if he really DID seem to bring bad luck to everyone he came in contact with (including the two people who grew very fond of him).

FYI:  The dog was Bogie's own dog Zero.    That is the only reason Mad Dog Earle didn't shoot it! :lol:

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

Kay Francis does seem like an odd choice.  However, after having recently watched several of her earliest performances from '29 through '31 or so, where she often played vamps and villainesses, I knew that she had that capability. I thought she was good and believable as the heartless wife in this movie. 

Francis was cast at the behest of Lombard who was helping her out after her career tanked at Warners.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
36 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

Kay Francis does seem like an odd choice.  However, after having recently watched several of her earliest performances from '29 through '31 or so, where she often played vamps and villainesses, I knew that she had that capability. I thought she was good and believable as the heartless wife in this movie. 

I agree. Grant and Lombard are two favourites of mine, while Kay Francis, fashion plate or not, generally leaves me cold.

Having said that, I think she steals In Name Only as the manipulative, conniving wife and is the most interesting thing about that soap opera.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, TomJH said:

I agree. Grant and Lombard are two favourites of mine, while Kay Francis, fashion plate or not, generally leaves me cold.

Having said that, I think she steals In Name Only as the manipulative, conniving wife and is the most interesting thing about that soap opera.

I have to say that Kay Francis really has something for me. I love her combination of sophistication (the short, slicked-back hair somehow looks feminine on her) combined with a special vulnerability. Her eyes seem to convey a plea to be gentle, and her little lisp is so charming when it slips out. I don't know if I've ever seen In Name Only, but I loved Kay Francis in Trouble in Paradise.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
53 minutes ago, RosieSayer said:

I have to say that Kay Francis really has something for me. I love her combination of sophistication (the short, slicked-back hair somehow looks feminine on her) combined with a special vulnerability. Her eyes seem to convey a plea to be gentle, and her little lisp is so charming when it slips out. I don't know if I've ever seen In Name Only, but I loved Kay Francis in Trouble in Paradise.

While Francis could be rather 'flat' I found her to be very enjoyable and rather sexy in films like Trouble in Paradise,  Jewel Robbery,  and One Way Passage.   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, BagelOnAPlateOfOnionRolls said:

LawrenceA, I noticed that the last view movies you've posted about in this thread were from 1939.

Is that just a coincidence?

No. I'm currently watching movies that I've recorded/bought from the year 1939. When that's done, I'll move to 1940, then 1941, etc. etc. I'll break the pattern for newer titles or something very rare that I may miss out on if I don't watch it immediately (via streaming or on TV), but I stick to my watching schedule for the most part.

It's stupid and a little OCD, but that's how I roll.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Rains Came (1939) - Soapy romantic melodrama that turns into a disaster movie that turns back into a soapy romantic melodrama, from 20th Century-Fox and director Clarence Brown. In colonial East India, dissolute painter Tom Ransome (George Brent) is slowly going to seed, but his life gets complicated when the daughter (Brenda Joyce) of local missionaries falls for him. His friend, local Hindu doctor Rama Safti (Tyrone Power), has drawn the attention of bored rich wife Lady Edwina (Myrna Loy). Their love lives fall to the wayside, though, when a terrible earthquake strikes the region, followed by floods, fires, and disease. Also featuring Nigel Bruce, Maria Ouspenskaya, Marjorie Rambeau, Jane Darwell, Henry Travers, H.B. Warner, Joseph Schildkraut, Mary Nash, Laura Hope Crews, C. Montague Shaw, and Abner Biberman.

I though George Brent did a good job here, doing a better acting job than Tyrone Power (who, along with Loy, was the reason I watched this). Power is miscast and looks silly. Loy is very good, playing a slightly bad girl for the first time in a while, closer to the roles she had in her earlier career. The extensive supporting cast of familiar faces is enjoyable, even if a few are wasted. The highlight of the film is the elaborate earthquake sequence. I appreciated that the ending wasn't a cop-out, too. But all that being said, I still couldn't get into this one very much. It was up for several Oscars, including for Best Cinematography (Arthur Miller), Best Sound, Best Editing (Barbara McLean), Best Art Direction (William S. Darling, George Dudley), and Best Score (Alfred Newman), while it won for Best Special Effects.  (6/10)

Source: FXM.

the-rains-came-movie-poster-1939-1010746

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

New Members:

Register Here

Learn more about the new message boards:

FAQ

Having problems?

Contact Us