speedracer5

I Just Watched...

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Just now, LawrenceA said:

Lloyd Nolan would be 115 if he wasn't dead.

I've never heard of Lloyd Nolan.  I'll take your word for it. I was just trying to be a wiseacre.  Lol.

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Just now, speedracer5 said:

I've never heard of Lloyd Nolan.  I'll take your word for it. I was just trying to be a wiseacre.  Lol.

Also in many films "Back to Bataan"  "A Tree Grows in Brooklyn" "Peyton Place" & more

& ironically as I touched on in the Natalie wood topic, Nolan also chose the 3 & 1/2 acre "Westwood, park"

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Just now, speedracer5 said:

I've never heard of Lloyd Nolan.  I'll take your word for it. I was just trying to be a wiseacre.  Lol.

Your words are like a George Raft punch to Lloyd's sensitive jaw.

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Charlie Chan's Murder Cruise (1940) - More whodunit theatrics from 20th Century-Fox and director Eugene Forde. Chan (Sidney Toler) is back in his homebase of Hawaii when he gets a visit from an old friend who is promptly murdered. The old friend had been trailing a murderer who had been on an around-the-world cruise, so Chan sets out to find the culprit among the passengers. Featuring Lionel Atwill, Leo G. Carroll, Kay Linaker, Robert Lowery, Victor Sen Yung, Marjorie Weaver, Don Beddoe, Harlan Briggs, Cora Witherspoon, Charles Middleton, Claire Du Brey, Leonard Mudie, James Burke, Richard Keene, C. Montague Shaw, and Layne Tom Jr.

I liked this one a little more than the last, mainly due to the interesting cast. Much of the action is fairly static, though, and the movie lacks any real stylistic touches.  (7/10)

Source: Fox DVD.

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10 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

I've never heard of Lloyd Nolan.  I'll take your word for it. I was just trying to be a wiseacre.  Lol.

You will also be privileged to see Lloyd Nolan if you watch one of Holden's scheduled upcoming films, Toward the Unknown. (Holden's worst imo)

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5 minutes ago, Thenryb said:

You will also be privileged to see Lloyd Nolan if you watch one of Holden's scheduled upcoming films, Toward the Unknown. (Holden's worst imo)

Lol. Ok. I looked at Nolan's filmography and I have seen a bunch of films of his (A Tree Grows in Brooklyn, Lady in the Lake, Bataan, Portrait in Black, Two Smart People, Easy Living...) but I wouldn't be able to pick him out of a lineup. 

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7 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

Lol. Ok. I looked at Nolan's filmography and I have seen a bunch of films of his (A Tree Grows in Brooklyn, Lady in the Lake, Bataan, Portrait in Black, Two Smart People, Easy Living...) but I wouldn't be able to pick him out of a lineup. 

Lloyd Nolan was the co-star of the groundbreaking TV show Julia,  starring Diahann Carroll.

My favorite role for him on classic TV was as Bugs Moran on The Untouchables.

 And I really enjoyed one of his last roles, which would have been the father to Hannah's Sisters with Mia Farrow's real life mom, Maureen O'Sullivan, playing his wife.

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1 hour ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Force of Evil is my favorite Garfield film.    

I like this one too.  Very well acted.

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42 minutes ago, Princess of Tap said:

Lloyd Nolan was the co-star of the groundbreaking TV show Julia,  starring Diahann Carroll.

My favorite role for him on classic TV was as Bugs Moran on The Untouchables.

 And I really enjoyed one of his last roles, which would have been the father to Hannah's Sisters with Mia Farrow's real life mom, Maureen O'Sullivan, playing his wife.

I like Lloyd especially in Somewhere in the Night with John Hodiak and Nancy Guild  and  in The Lemon Drop Kid.

He played a diverse quality of roles, which made every film more intriguing.  I do remember him  on the TV Show, Julia,  with  Dihann Carroll and Lurene Tuttle. 

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Charlie Chan at the Wax Museum (1940) - Here we go again, from 20th Century-Fox and director Lynn Shores. Chan (Sidney Toler) is in New York along with son Jimmy (Victor Sen Yung) in order to testify in the trial of notorious gangster and killer Sam McBirney (Marc Lawrence). However, McBirney escapes from the courthouse and hides out at Dr. Cream's Crime Museum, a series of displays featuring wax figure reenactments of true crimes. Dr. Cream himself (C. Henry Gordon) is also secretly a plastic surgeon specializing in altering criminals' faces to avoid capture. While McBirney recovers from his surgery, he hatches an elaborate plane to lure Chan to the museum to exact revenge. Also featuring Joan Valerie, Marguerite Chapman, Ted Osborne, Michael Visaroff, Hilda Vaughn, Charles Wagenheim, Archie Twitchell, Joe King and Eddie Marr.

As you can guess from the plot description, this is sillier and more cartoonish than usual. The unusual setting and the oddball characters make this an enjoyable watch, even if things frequently stretch the limits of credulity. (7/10)

Source: Fox DVD.

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The "Tesla's Death Ray: A Murder Declassified" (2018)

Still don't know who killed Nikola Tesla and those guys sure did went through a lot of trouble for a Tesla coil on steroids.  Biggest one shot down a drone at 100 feet.  Gives reason why we don't see any Death rays from the Russians.:wacko:

 

This?  Nah!

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4 minutes ago, hamradio said:

The "Tesla's Death Ray: A Murder Declassified" (2018)

Still don't know who killed Nikola Tesla and those guys sure did went through a lot of trouble for a Tesla coil on steroids.  Biggest one shot down a drone at 100 feet.  Gives reason why we don't see any Death rays from the Russians.

I saw part of this earlier tonight, as well. It was padded too much with pointless reality-TV style garbage to keep me from tuning out, though. It could have been told in a 30-minute show, or even less.

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9 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

I saw part of this earlier tonight, as well. It was padded too much with pointless reality-TV style garbage to keep me from tuning out, though. It could have been told in a 30-minute show, or even less.

Keep an eye on the news, he might attempt to build one in the back yard.

 In lieu of flowers send to...

 

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In a Better World (2010)---An intense drama touching upon two families, each with a young son who is being severely bullied at school. The idea of bullying is the point of departure for a look at related issues, especially the idea of revenge. The original Danish title was actually that single word---revenge. It was changed (the new title is somewhat of a stub IMO) for the International release, probably for the better, at least for the USA IMO since the original title would probably conjure the notion of an actioner with a minimum of delicacy instead of what it is, a rather heavy-hitting soap opera that deals with the inevitable emotional upheaval with a modicum of nuance here and there. The movie asks how does one handle this sort of humiliating experience. This theme is enlarged by the fact that one of the fathers is a doctor who treats patients at a Sudanese refugee camp and has to deal with roving warlords. Back home this father makes what what comes across as a wise decision in turning the other cheek when he himself is bullied and lightly pushed around by a neighbor mainly because the offense was relatively light weight but could have escalated into something of a serious and perhaps far-reaching consequence. So what do you do when such discretion is lost on your 10-year-old son who thinks you're a coward and calls you a wimp? The teleplay makes clear (tacitly) that domestic corporeal punishment or no dessert for a week is not the answer, it wants to mean business and point to a more non-visceral response. This episode is thematically important and hits home with its direct simplicity and urgency but is subservient in scope to what these two young boys are up to.  There is backstory where a mother has died of cancer in one family, and a separation is in progress in the other, both that take a toll on the two young boys, who both (actors) have apparently received a great deal of credit and deservedly so, since they both are new to the screen. But its the work of a Danish actress named Trine Dyrholm that quite bowled me over. She pulls off an incredibly charged scene where she stumbles upon the neighboring boy in the hall of a hospital towards whom she has an uncontrollable and justifiable anger coarsing through her veins, which during the present and devastating acting out suddenly realizes that she is talking to a child, a child the same age as her own.  The struggle in betraying a sudden compassion in such a circumstance is extraordinary. Wisely, the teleplay imposes an interruption to the scene, otherwise the whole thing might have been ruined by either over sentimentality or rank incredulity. As is, it is terrific and I still have not been able to quite get it out of my mind.

 

Danish, (in  mostly English, and Danish), this movie won both the Academy Award for Best Foreign Film and the Golden Globe Award for Best Foreign Film in 2011.

 

 

***1/2  

 

 

Netflix

 

(4max)

 

 

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Lawrence, help me out here...

I SWEAR I read about a Charlie Chan film (set in Hawaii?) that featured BELA LUGOSI in a role, not as Chan but as the villain.

I seem to foggily recall seeing it on youtube and it not being good...

i went to Lugosi's imdb page and it was not among his credits.

(neither is PLAN 9!)

Am I hallucinating this film?

 

edit: nevermind it was THE BLACK CAMEL.

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16 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Castle on the Hudson (1940) - Old-fashioned prison drama from Warner Brothers and director Anatole Litvak. Cocky criminal Tommy Gordon (John Garfield) gets busted for his latest armed robbery job, and despite his lawyer's best efforts, Tommy gets sent up the river to Sing-Sing, the "castle on the Hudson", for 5-to-30 years. He immediately butts heads with warden Long (Pat O'Brien), but the warden sees something good in Tommy, as does Tommy's loyal girlfriend Kay (Ann Sheridan). Also featuring Burgess Meredith, Guinn "Big Boy" Williams, Jerome Cowan, Henry O'Neill, Margot Stevenson, Eddie Acuff, Paul Hurst, William Hopper, and John Litel.

I'd seen the original 20,000 Years in Sing-Sing with Spencer Tracy that this was a remake of, and I liked that one a bit better. Maybe I just excused the script's naivete due to the earlier era. Either way, this version isn't completely awful, just frequently corny and unbelievable, especially the third act scene when O'Brien lets Garfield travel unattended and unsupervised back to NYC to visit his ailing girlfriend, with the promise to return the next day. Yes, O'Brien should lose his job. Sheridan is lovely as usual, but doesn't have a lot to do. I was impressed with Burgess Meredith's role as an intelligent fellow con determined to escape.   (6/10)

Source: TCM.

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I recently viewed the original version with Tracy and Bette Davis (20, 000 YEARS IN SING SING) and I also commented on the unlikelihood of the prison authorities allowing a convicted felon to leave prison for a short time and relying on only on HIS word that he would come back. I agree that in the real word, the warden would have lost his job, even if said convict DID come back.

I haven't seen this version though, although I did quite like the original. If it plays out like 20,000 YEARS did, I don't think I'll go out of my way to catch it. Already saw Garfield in THE POSTMAN ALWAYS RINGS TWICE (SPOILER ALERT BTW) go to the death chamber in that one, have no need to see him meet a similar fate in this one. Alright, we don't exactly see him go to the gas chamber, but we know that's what happens to him.

 

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16 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Charlie Chan in Panama (1940) -

 

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Anyone ever notice the speed with which non medical professionals are ready to declare somebody dead in old movies?

I just watched a bit from Charlie Chan in Panama when a man, while talking to Chan, suddenly gags and keels over.

Chan immediately says to an assistant, "Call doctor."

He then takes the guy's pulse (for all of three seconds) and says, "Wait. Too late for doctor. Call police."

I feel like saying, "Hey Charlie, what's your hurry? Call the doctor! Your three second pulse count could be wrong, ya know!"

This is not a knock on this particular film as it is on so many films produced by the studios during the '30s and '40s (the mysteries, in particular, I suppose), film characters that seem to be eager to declare that a doctor is not necessary when someone drops to the floor, just get the coroner or police. 

I don't know about you but if I ever find my face suddenly slamming onto hardwood I hope that somebody near me is the cautious type and thinks that a doctor or ambulance might be a good idea.

If I'm lying on the floor, barely conscious, the last words (literally) that I want to hear are, "This guy's done. Someone get a shovel."

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A Dispatch from Reuter's (1940) - Hollywood history lesson and biopic from Warner Brothers and director William Dieterle. Edward G. Robinson stars as Paul Julius Reuter, a mid-19th century German/British/Belgian (?) with an interest in speeding up the process by which news travels. He starts a messenger pigeon service to compete with the current method of horse-drawn carriage and train delivery of the mail and news. Later, he struggles to compete with the telegraph wire, and with the vagaries of transatlantic news delivery. Also featuring Edna Best, Eddie Albert, Albert Bassermann, Otto Kruger, Gene Lockhart, Montagu Love, Nigel Bruce, James Stephenson, Lumsden Hare, Robert Warwick, and Dickie Moore.

This is a handsome production, with nice sets and costumes.The mixture of accents is a bit odd, though. I was never sure who was supposed to be from where, or even where most of the story was supposed to be taking place. I thought it was Belgium, then perhaps Great Britain, but I'm still not sure. The story is decent, and a part of history not often discussed, so the change of pace was nice.  (7/10)

Source: TCM.

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This Woman is Dangerous. I recorded this 1952 Joan Crawford movie because A) I like Joan Crawford's Warner Brothers era and 2) I liked the title. After seeing this film, I think that they overstated how dangerous Crawford's character was.  She is not dangerous at all. It's as if "Mildred Pierce" decided to join a crime syndicate to help recoup lost profits after the failure of her restaurant chain.  Crawford plays the same type of strong woman facing hard times that she often plays.  In this film, Crawford plays Beth Austin, the head of the gang of criminals who pull off heists in high class locales. Crawford's character was specifically recruited for her class as she could get the gang into nicer locations and provide a believable front. The gang pulls off a casino heist by impersonating police officers and make off with $90,000.  Crawford is also dating one of the gangsters, a man named Matt who will kill without giving it a second thought.  The conflict in this film is that Crawford is losing her eyesight and must undergo surgery to try and reverse her declining eyesight before she is blind entirely.  Her doctor refers her to Dr. Ben Halleck, portrayed by Dennis Morgan.  Morgan is reluctant to perform the surgery, as it is experimental, but Crawford pressures him to do so, figuring that she doesn't have much to lose.

At this point in the film, the movie kind of switches gears from a noir to more of a melodrama.  As Crawford works to recover from the operation, she and Morgan begin to fall in love.  Crawford accompanies Morgan on a few "house calls" where she sees the empathy and kindness that he displays toward his patients and their families.  She also has dinner at Morgan's home one night where she meets his adorable daughter and seems to instantly bond with her.  The tension throughout this segment of the film is whether or not Morgan will find out about Crawford's past.  The FBI is on her trail as is the private detective that her boyfriend hires to keep tabs on Crawford to see if there is more going on between her and Morgan, aside from her convalescence. The climax of the film involves Crawford's boyfriend visiting Morgan's hospital hoping to kill Morgan and Crawford following her boyfriend to the hospital to keep him from killing Morgan. 

This film was okay, Crawford was fine in her part and Morgan turned in the same type of dependable performance that he usually does.  However, this film couldn't decide whether or not it wanted to be a noir or a melodrama, and it wasn't captivating enough to be a melodramatic noir like Mildred Pierce.  While I didn't hate it, I don't think I'll need to watch this film over and over.  Crawford called this her worst film.  I think she has worse films out there, Ice Follies of 1939 comes to mind, but this definitely isn't among her best. 

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Down Argentine Way (1940) - Technicolor musical from 20th Century-Fox and director Irving Cummings. The wafer-thin plot concerns wealthy Buenos Aires horse rancher Ricardo Quintana (Don Ameche) traveling to America to sell some horses, where he meets wealthy American horse enthusiast Glenda Crawford (Betty Grable). The two instantly fall in love, but there's a problem: Ricardo's father Don Diego (Henry Stephenson) hates the Crawford family due to some disagreement decades earlier. Glenda eventually travels to Argentina with her aunt Binnie (Charlotte Greenwood) to try and win over the old man. Also featuring J. Carrol Naish, Leonid Kinskey, Chris-Pin Martin, Kay Aldridge, and Carmen Miranda.

This was a major hit when released, and made Betty Grable a star. The movie was intended as a vehicle for Alice Faye, but when she bowed out, Grable was assigned the lead, becoming one of the biggest stars of the decade in the process. She's pleasant, pretty without being overly made-up, as she sometimes appeared later. I don't think I've seen Charlotte Greenwood in anything, and I liked her here, giving an interesting spin on the older-matron-companion role. Naish hams it up big time as a peasant stable hand. Kinskey has the biggest role I can remember seeing him in as a paid escort and guide to Greenwood, playing the type usually assayed by Mischa Auer. This movie was also the general American public's introduction to Carmen Miranda. She was signed to a strict contract at a NYC nightclub at the time, and so her scenes were all filmed there, and consequently her part is rather small, singing a few songs. I enjoyed the dance sequence where the Nicholas Brothers perform and basically steal the show from everyone else. The movie earned three Oscar nominations, for Best Cinematography (Leon Shamroy & Ray Rennahan), Best Art Direction (Richard Day & Joseph C. Wright), and Best Song ("Down Argentine Way").   (7/10)

Source:Fox DVD. There's a short featurette on the life of Betty Grable and a bunch of trailers for her movies. There is also an envelope of lobby cards inside the DVD case.

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5 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

 

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I've always enjoyed this movie, for many reasons, from Henry Stephenson's brief singing with a Spanish accent; to Charlotte Greenwood's amazing high kicks. And of course Ms. Miranda.

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32 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

Down Argentine Way (1940) -  I enjoyed the dance sequence where the Nicholas Brothers perform and basically steal the show from everyone else.

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The Nicholas Brothers were great and charismatic dancers but every time they do their leaps in the air, ending with a double leg split with their crotches hitting the floor I SCREAM OUT LOUD (!!!).

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Earlier tonight, I rewatched a portion of California Suite, although I was busy doing some other things as well, so I don't know how much I really saw. Anyway, having seen it a few years ago, it must be stated that it is a lumpy film overall, but portions of it wirk quite well. The Pryor/Cosby sequences fizzle, but the others are all interesting to various degrees. I think I liked the Fonda/Alda segment a bit more this time, the Matthau/May one was rather amusing and I loved her final line, but really this film belongs to Maggie Smith and Michael Caine who steal it from everyone. 

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3 hours ago, TomJH said:

The Nicholas Brothers were great and charismatic dancers but every time they do their leaps in the air, ending with a double leg split with their crotches hitting the floor I SCREAM OUT LOUD (!!!).

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I love the Nicholas Brothers.  It's a always a treat when they pop up in a film I'm watching. Those splits are amazing and something I'd never attempt.  I can't even do splits standing still on the ground! 

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