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Love is All You Need (2012) Dan., subtitles, some English) - Ida Hjort (Trine Dyrholm) home from the doctor after a cancer check up finds her husband boinking a young thing from work on the sofa. We want her to be decisive and throw him out but instead she looks dismayed and seems to accept, albeit reluctantly (thank god for that anyway), his excuse that he is under a lot of stress due to her illness. Her son and daughter (as well as a co-worker) already know that he treats her badly even without being aware of this most recent boinking. Ida's daughter is getting married in Italy and she rams her car into another on her way to the airport that is driven by none other than the father of her fiance (Pierce Brosnan), who she didn't know before. The teleplay manages some saccharine music amid the fracas which is a giveaway although we already know something is up from the title of the movie. Much of the movie takes place in Italy and it becomes a sort of Enchanted April but with balls. The two principles are seen on their villa balconies stretching and yawning while playing peek-a-boo flirtation games. There are some gritty subplots with jarring twists involving other members of the wedding party. A recurring theme among them seems to be is getting fed up and moving on. Lots of people get balled out. Netflix calls this a comedy but that would certainly be scanned. I don't buy it. The aforementioned music is recurring throughout that seems to palliate the tone of the story when it gets too tough but that doesn't make it funny. I am becoming a fan of Trine Dyrholm, an immensely appealing presence. She has a face (a pretty one as you might guess) that is unusually expressive, even when registering the most common every day reactions. My full appreciation of her was hampered due to rapid-fire dialogue that kept my eyes on the subtitles at the expense of an otherwise would-be happy and constant gaze upon her person. This is an enjoyable romantic not-exactly-comedy drama with some oddball elements. I almost rejected the movie early for fear of being subjected to a hard-core weepie but it wasn't quite like that. The sometimes gooey soundtrack made me a little nervous, though. This is the second collaboration of filmmaker Susanne Beier and Miss Dyrholm that I've seen recently (the other being In a Better World) and I may go back for more if there is any.

 

 

***

 

Netflix

 

R=4max

 

 

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On 2/23/2018 at 12:43 AM, darkblue said:

I don't get why she used the word "wicked".

Not having sex when you're not married is wicked? Makes no sense at all.

Bette Davis meant the upbringing was wicked (evil), that it was wicked for parents or society to tell girls that they had to wait until marriage to have sex with someone they loved. 

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Lady with Red Hair (1940) - Overwrought highly fictionalized biopic from Warner Brothers and director Curtis Bernhardt. The film charts the unlikely theatrical success of turn-of-the-century stage star Mrs. Leslie Carter (Miriam Hopkins). Already in her 30's when she endured a scandalous divorce in Chicago, she decides to become a theater actress, although having no experience. A rich family friend agrees to back her in a play on Broadway to be written by an incredulous and uncooperative David Belasco (Claude Rains), then one of the stage's leading producers. With Belasco's tutelage, Carter ends up becoming a much admired actress, but not without her ups and downs. Also featuring Laura Hope Crews, Richard Ainley, Helen Westley, John Litel, Mona Barrie, Victor Jory, Fritz Leiber, Selmer Jackson, John Hamilton, Cecil Kellaway, and Cornel Wilde.

The real Mrs. Leslie Carter had one of her final roles before her death in 1935's Becky Sharp, which may have played a part in Hopkins wishing to do this misguided biopic. From what I can gather, much of the material in the movie is fictitious, designed to make Carter look like more of victimized saint, when naturally the truth is much murkier. One wouldn't also gather why Carter was considered a sensation, as all of the play reenactments in the film are hammy and phony. Hopkins never manages to be likable, and I say this as someone who has liked Hopkins in a number of other things (I know she has some critics here). Rains also gets shout, scowl, yell, thrash around, and then shout some more. Speaking of bad wigs from The Howards of Virginia, Claude sports one here. The only worthwhile scene in the whole movie, really, was a catty dinner scene at a boarding house for theatrical people.   (5/10)

Source: TCM.

lady-with-red-hair-movie-poster-md.jpg

 

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1 hour ago, LawrenceA said:

Lady with Red Hair (1940) -  Also featuring Laura Hope Crews, Richard Ainley, Helen Westley, John Litel, Mona Barrie, Victor Jory, Fritz Leiber, Selmer Jackson, John Hamilton, Cecil Kellaway, and Cornel Wilde.

 Hopkins never manages to be likable, and I say this as someone who has liked Hopkins in a number of other things (I know she has some critics here).

1. I adore HELEN WESTLEY. Whenever her name shows up in ANYTHING, it's worth sitting down for. She is a delight in ANNE OF GREEN GABLES especially.

2. I love 1930's Miriam Hopkins- scheming, wicked, immoral Mimsey- BUT SOMETHING HAPPENED IN THE LATE 30's and she stopped being fun onscreen and started being stiff and disingenuous...also something happened with her face- i think she was an early victim of experimental plastic surgery, because she has a very stiff, unexpressive mask from thereon in her career.

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15 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

1. I adore HELEN WESTLEY. Whenever her name shows up in ANYTHING, it's worth sitting down for. She is a delight in ANNE OF GREEN GABLES especially.

In a complete coincidence, I'm now watching another theatrical biopic, also featuring Helen Westley.

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4 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

In a complete coincidence, I'm now watching another theatrical biopic, also featuring Helen Westley.

Hells got around; I think she was big on the stage before film came along.

Can't remember when she died, but I want to say it was the early forties...?

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Lillian Russell (1940) - Another hokey, ham-fisted theatrical biopic, this time with music, from 20th Century Fox and director irving Cummings. Helen Leonard (Alice Faye) hopes for a career in the opera, but is told her voice isn't good enough. However, since she's so stunningly beautiful, she should still get musical training for the traditional theater, because that's how that works. Theatrical producer Tony Pastor (Leo Carrillo) discovers her and, changing her name to Lillian Russell, he makes her a stage star. Her talent wins her fans the world over, as well as the admiration of many powerful men, such as Diamond Jim Brady (Edward Arnold) and songwriter Edward Solomon (Don Ameche), but her heart truly belongs to hometown reporter Alexander (Henry Fonda). Also featuring Warren William, Helen Westley, Dorothy Peterson, Ernest Truex, Nigel Bruce, Lynn Bari, Claud Allister, Una O'Connor, Eddie Foy Jr., and Weber & Fields.

People spend a lot of time in this movie telling Alice Faye how beautiful she is. A lot of time, repeatedly warning her that her beauty is so magnificent that her life will be difficult because of it. Faye is told how gorgeous she is so many times that it starts to seem like a self-esteem exercise rather than a narrative. And I don't find Faye that pretty, to be honest, so it makes the repetition that much more noticeable. Ameche plays a grouch, and Fonda has to do his wide-eyed sincerity good-guy shtick, while Arnold hams it up repeating a role he had played in an earlier film, and Warren William is completely wasted. Fonda was said to have regretted this movie the most of any he did under contract to Fox. The musical aspects are also lackluster, with no major musical numbers, just pieces of songs here and there, and a couple of minor full performances. Like many of these biopics, it's also an excuse for some nostalgia wallowing, this time with Eddie Foy Jr. playing his father doing an old stage bit, and vaudeville comedy duo dinosaurs Weber & Fields doing some hoary bits. The movie earned one Oscar nomination, for Best Art Direction (Richard Day, Joseph C. Wright).   (5/10)

Source: Fox DVD, with a feaurette on the real Lillian Russell.

MV5BNmY4NTQ4YjAtZWIxOC00Y2E0LThhOTYtZWZj

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4 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

The real Mrs. Leslie Carter had one of her final roles before her death in 1935's Becky Sharp,

And then there were her roles after her death....  :P

 

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2 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

In a complete coincidence, I'm now watching another theatrical biopic, also featuring Helen Westley.

I love Helen Westley too!  Her performances are superb!  She was great in All This and Heaven Too, which is my favorite film.  She was also in Anne of Green Gables, '34, etc.  My dad used to point her out in 30's films too, along with Walter Brennan and Harry Davenport, etc.   Not sure when she died, but a great loss to the Golden Age of films.  Going to look her up.

2 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

Hells got around; I think she was big on the stage before film came along.

Can't remember when she died, but I want to say it was the early forties...?

2 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

Hells got around; I think she was big on the stage before film came along.

Can't remember when she died, but I want to say it was the early forties...?

2 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

Hells got around; I think she was big on the stage before film came along.

Can't remember when she died, but I want to say it was the early forties...?

 

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18 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

Lillian Russell (1940) - Another hokey, ham-fisted theatrical biopic, this time with music, from 20th Century Fox and director irving Cummings. Helen Leonard (Alice Faye) hopes for a career in the opera, but is told her voice isn't good enough. However, since she's so stunningly beautiful, she should still get musical training for the traditional theater, because that's how that works. Theatrical producer Tony Pastor (Leo Carrillo) discovers her and, changing her name to Lillian Russell, he makes her a stage star. Her talent wins her fans the world over, as well as the admiration of many powerful men, such as Diamond Jim Brady (Edward Arnold) and songwriter Edward Solomon (Don Ameche), but her heart truly belongs to hometown reporter Alexander (Henry Fonda). Also featuring Warren William, Helen Westley, Dorothy Peterson, Ernest Truex, Nigel Bruce, Lynn Bari, Claud Allister, Una O'Connor, Eddie Foy Jr., and Weber & Fields.

People spend a lot of time in this movie telling Alice Faye how beautiful she is. A lot of time, repeatedly warning her that her beauty is so magnificent that her life will be difficult because of it. Faye is told how gorgeous she is so many times that it starts to seem like a self-esteem exercise rather than a narrative. And I don't find Faye that pretty, to be honest, so it makes the repetition that much more noticeable. Ameche plays a grouch, and Fonda has to do his wide-eyed sincerity good-guy shtick, while Arnold hams it up repeating a role he had played in an earlier film, and Warren William is completely wasted. Fonda was said to have regretted this movie the most of any he did under contract to Fox. The musical aspects are also lackluster, with no major musical numbers, just pieces of songs here and there, and a couple of minor full performances. Like many of these biopics, it's also an excuse for some nostalgia wallowing, this time with Eddie Foy Jr. playing his father doing an old stage bit, and vaudeville comedy duo dinosaurs Weber & Fields doing some hoary bits. The movie earned one Oscar nomination, for Best Art Direction (Richard Day, Joseph C. Wright).   (5/10)

Source: Fox DVD, with a feaurette on the real Lillian Russell.

MV5BNmY4NTQ4YjAtZWIxOC00Y2E0LThhOTYtZWZj

 

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10 minutes ago, MCannady1 said:

I love Helen Westley too!  Her performances are superb!  She was great in All This and Heaven Too, which is my favorite film.  She was also in Anne of Green Gables, '34, etc.  My dad used to point her out in 30's films too, along with Walter Brennan and Harry Davenport, etc.   Not sure when she died, but a great loss to the Golden Age of films.  Going to look her up.

 

According to IMDb, Helen Westley died in 1942, But she had a really impressive career in sound films before she did. (Maybe 20+ titles.)

 

ps- I also LOVE ALL THIS AND HEAVEN TOO. I can ALWAYS watch that movie.

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Yes. the film was not as interesting as I had anticipated and Alice's appearance was complimented a great deal in it.  It was a great cast, but you are right that Warren William's great talent was wasted there in his role.

I do think that Alice was quite lovely in some earlier films.  My favorite in which she sang beautifully as well, was Poor Little Rich Girl ('35) with Shirley Temple.  Her songs were lovely and timeless.  Shirley chimed in later, but Alice's songs were quite marvelous.  Though Shirley was quite talented too, it is Alice's character that is riveting.  Anyone who has not caught this one, it is my favorite Shirley Temple film and was not even included in a boxed set of her films a few years ago.  Luckily, I was able to tape a lovely copy.

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34 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

According to IMDb, Helen Westley died in 1942, But she had a really impressive career in sound films before she did. (Maybe 20+ titles.)

 

ps- I also LOVE ALL THIS AND HEAVEN TOO. I can ALWAYS watch that movie.

Me too!    It was Mom's favorite film and later mine too.  I first saw it as a teen on the Early Show and later came to appreciate everyone in the film.  Bette Davis and Charles Boyer are 2 of my very favorites, plus Barbara O'Neil was quite impressive as the jealous wife of the Duke.   Great to see June Lockhart as the oldest daughter.

Sadly, I just looked up Helen Westley, and she died 2 years later, in '42 at the age of 67.  So she played older parts at times.  Whatever the part, she was superb.

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On 2/23/2018 at 1:20 AM, laffite said:

The Damned Don't Cry (1950) = The movie suffers from the frailty of the narrative and the lack of a cohesively conceived and believable main character. Both are decisively unrealistic. The movie survives because the embodiment of the main character is Joan Crawford, which subordinates plot and irreality and elevates suspension of disbelief so that her performance can be viewed undismissed and enjoyed. It's fine but not as compelling as some others she did in this period, say, between 1945-53, from Mildred Pierce to Sudden Fear. Staunch fans are not likely to be disappointed however ; and yet she isn't the whole show. The mild-mannered bookkeeper Kent Smith (not Clark Kent, haha), the towering robot-like stepper crime boss David Brian, as well as the California-based enfant terrible of the organization, Steve Cochran, are all good.

**

Netflix

(Rating 4max)

I agree that the story lacks a cohesive structure for the main character.  Because Joan Crawford was known for many superb roles, I think the movie was initially able to stay afloat. People enjoyed it largely due to Joan's efforts in her role.  The remaining key roles also enhanced the film; her meek bookkeeper friend, Kent Smith, (not Clark Kent, -smile,  but quite kind and appealing), and the terribly frightening crime boss, David Brian.  He has an intriguing personality which jumps from kindness to unwarranted suspicion in an instant.  There is an interesting scene in which Joan's character meets his subdued wife, but she had seemed younger in a painting she had just viewed.  Somehow, it never gets clarified.  .....Also, the powerful Steve Cochran, handsome but even more dangerous in the organization than David's character.  The two men's attraction to Joan and their enmity toward each other leads to a possible tragic denouement.  

When we put these suspenseful ingredients together,  it makes an impressive film.  All are very good and ultimately believable in their roles.

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6 hours ago, Fedya said:

And then there were her roles after her death....  :P

 

Instead of just a "Haha" emoticon there should also be a "Ha" emoticon. It could be :lol: that quickly morphs into :mellow:.

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Terror Out of the Sky (1978) - Pedestrian nature-gone-wild TV movie from CBS and director Lee H. Katzin. This follow-up to 1976's The Savage Bees concerns the return of a strain of killer bees thought wiped out in the last movie. Instead, some new queens have popped up at a bee research laboratory and have been inadvertently shipped across the country to unsuspecting apiarists. Chief bee-ologist David Martin (Efrem Zimbalist Jr.), his young protege Jeannie (Tovah Feldshuh), and her burly pilot boyfriend Nick (Dan Haggerty) set out to stop the bees before it's too late. Also featuring Steven Franken, Richard Herd, Lonny Chapman, Charles Hallahan, Ike Eisenmann, Joe E. Tata, and Philip Baker Hall.

Chintzy, overlong even at 90 edited minutes, and without a single scare or original moment in the script, this is terrible, but fairly typical for a TV movie of the era. Feldshuh was a recast of the first movie's Gretchen Corbett.  (3/10)

Source: Svengoolie by way of MeTV.

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Sherlock Holmes (1932).

Stylish, entertaining early talkie Holmes adventure featuring Clive Brook in the title role.

Directed with considerable flair by William K. Howard, the film gets off to a fine start with the sounds of Big Ben tolling as the audience see the silhouettes of three men slowly walking. The first and third are those of bobbies, with a prisoner between them. We are then transported to a courtroom where Professor Moriarty is about to be condemned to death for murder.

Prior to his sentencing, however, Moriarty is allowed to speak, congratulating all involved in his prosecution but informing them, "Gentlemen, I regret to say that the rope that will hang me has not yet been made." He then says that all those involved in bringing him to court will meet their doom before him, including Sherlock Holmes.

Soon afterward Moriarty makes partial good on his word by making a daring escape from prison, then launching into a plot to disgrace Holmes and, once he is out of the way, perform a daring bank robbery.

Supposedly based on a Holmes play by William Gillette, there are, apparently, few signs of that play in the final screen product. The film is set in modern times, rather than Victorian, with Holmes working on an invention to konk out the engines on criminals' cars as the police pursue them. A lot of law enforcement today would be grateful for such a device, I'm sure. Holmes is engaged to be married in his earliest scenes, his fiancee (played by Miriam Jordan) eagerly wanting to see him retired from sleuthing. Holmes, in the film's earliest scenes, not yet aware of Moriarty's prison escape, professes that he will miss him.

Reginald Owen appears as Dr. Watson with relatively little to do in the film, while Alan Mowbray is a reserved Scotland Yard inspector with a competitive relationship with Holmes.

As Holmes Clive Brook is quite acceptable. He certainly looks the part, has, as always, a superior attitude and perfect diction. Some might think him a little too stiff in the role, though. He doesn't show the same enthusiasm for the part that Basil Rathbone later would, at least in that actor's earliest forays into the role. This was actually Brooks' second film appearance as the Baker Street sleuth, having played him three years earlier in The Return of Sherlock Holmes, a film I haven't seen.

The film does have an amusing sequence in which Holmes disguises himself as an old woman (shades of Lon Chaney in The Unholy Three?), adopting a high falsetto, clearly dubbed for Brook. It's fun to watch though when Holmes as the old lady is able to fool a master mind like Moriarty with his disguise it clearly strains credulity.

The most fun contribution to the film has to be Ernest Torrence as a gentlemanly Moriarty. A towering figure, he delivers his dialogue with relish. In a scene towards the end Moriarty enters a dark cellar room where he has Holmes' fiancee bound and gagged, as well as Billy, a young boy who has been an enthusiastic Holmes disciple.

Torrence removes his hat before addressing them, apologizing for having "inconvenienced" them, while patting the boy on his head and telling him, "Oh, you're a bright lad, Billy, and why not? Isn't Mr. Holmes a bright man?"

"But not quite bright enough," he adds, with a mock sadness in his voice, as he exits the room.

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An atmospheric, at times humorous, take on Conan Doyles' most famous literary creation, 1932's Sherlock Holmes is definitely worth a look. Torrence as Moriarty may even make the film worthy of a second viewing, as well.

This film can be found on You Tube.

Sherlock+Holmes+1932.jpg

3 out of 4

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13 hours ago, MCannady1 said:

I agree that [THE DAMNED DON'T CRY] lacks a cohesive structure for the main character.  Because Joan Crawford was known for many superb roles, I think the movie was initially able to stay afloat.   There is an interesting scene in which Joan's character meets [David Brian's mob boss character's] subdued wife, but she had seemed younger in a painting she had just viewed.  Somehow, it never gets clarified.  .....

That scene bothers me so much.

It kinda seems like it has a reason for being there, but then again it doesn't- except to make the film all the more salacious. Can't help but wonder if it was added to pad the run time, or give the (very good) actress in the role an assignment and a day's pay- it never comes up again except to establish how thoroughly immoral Joan's character is.

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A few promotional images for Clive Brooks' first Sherlock Holmes film

MV5BOTkyZmE0ZjgtOGVmYi00OTdmLTgwM2ItNzVh

MV5BNjZhMmQ2YzItOTdhOS00YjYwLTk5ZTEtMzAy

MV5BYmZmYmI1YmEtMjdhMC00MzY0LTlhMmItZjI2

MV5BOGRhOWVkODItNDg4YS00ZjVlLTk3NjAtODBi

MV5BMDA2OGVlNmQtZTRkZi00MmY4LWI0NGItY2U0

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Lucky Partners (1940) - Silly romantic comedy from RKO and director Lewis Milestone. After a passing comment wishing her good luck seems to quickly pay off, bride-to-be Jean (Ginger Rogers) tracks down the commenter, painter David (Ronald Colman) with a proposition that they go in as partners on an Irish sweepstakes ticket. David agrees on the absurd condition that if they should win, Jean will go on a platonic honeymoon trip with him before her actual nuptials to insurance salesman Freddie (Jack Carson). Also featuring Spring Byington, Harry Davenport, Cecilia Loftus, Hugh O'Connell, Leon Belasco, Grady Sutton, and Billy Gilbert.

Rogers, sporting black hair, has some chemistry with cool Colman, and there are some funny bits here and there, and a generally amiable atmosphere to the whole thing. But the premise is unbelievable to the extreme, and I would have expected something a little more substantial from director Milestone. The movie ended up being big hit.  (6/10)

Source: TCM.

watch-lucky-partners-1940-movie-online.j

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Poor Clive looks extremely pallid in those posters.  :)

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9 minutes ago, Fedya said:

Poor Clive looks extremely pallid in those posters.  :)

With all that London fog, do you have any doubt why?

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Q: Did you hear about the man who went for a walk in the London fog and was never seen again?

A: He disappeared into thick air.

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Millie (1931).

Helen Twelvetrees stars in this thoroughly unmodern movie as a woman who flits from one lover to the next, leaving each time when she finds the guy is cheating on her.  She got married to the first lover and had a daughter by him before divorcing him and letting his rich family bring up the girl.

Time passes, and the daughter (Anita Louise) is now 16 years old.  One of the former lovers (not the girl's Dad) decides he's going to start going to church so he can perv on Millie's daughter!  When Millie finds out, she shoots the guy!  I'd say shades of Madame X, except that the daughter knows it's Mom who shot him.  Mom doesn't want to reveal what really happened at the trial, however.

Twelvetrees does her best with the idiotic material.  Frank McHugh and Joan Blondell have early supporting roles.  5/10.

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30 minutes ago, Fedya said:

Millie (1931).

Helen Twelvetrees stars in this thoroughly unmodern movie as a woman who flits from one lover to the next, leaving each time when she finds the guy is cheating on her.  She got married to the first lover and had a daughter by him before divorcing him and letting his rich family bring up the girl.

Time passes, and the daughter (Anita Louise) is now 16 years old.  One of the former lovers (not the girl's Dad) decides he's going to start going to church so he can perv on Millie's daughter!  When Millie finds out, she shoots the guy!  I'd say shades of Madame X, except that the daughter knows it's Mom who shot him.  Mom doesn't want to reveal what really happened at the trial, however.

Twelvetrees does her best with the idiotic material.  Frank McHugh and Joan Blondell have early supporting roles.  5/10.

I like Millie, which was the first Helen Twelvetrees film I had seen in the 80s.  My mother liked her films too, and mentioned The Young Bride as her favorite.  I saw this later and had to agree. 

With Millie, Helen's character was trying to save her innocent daughter from John Halliday's character.  He had boasted to friends about his affair with the mother when he was drunk in a nightclub.  Later, she found this former lover preying upon her daughter and acted to save her.  The film builds to a climax as her trial progresses in court. 

Yes, it was nice to see Frank McHugh and Joan Blondell in their early supporting roles.  I usually don't give a number, but would give Millie a 6 out of 10.

 

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