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I Just Watched...

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Wonder Wheel (2017) - Domestic melodrama from Amazon Studios and writer-director Woody Allen. In 1950's Coney Island, former wouldbe actress and current waitress Ginny (Kate Winslet) is unhappily married to occasionally violent carousel operator Humpty (Jim Belushi). Ginny's son (Jack Gore) from her first marriage is a budding pyromaniac, and she's also having an affair with aspiring writer and current lifeguard Mickey (Justin Timberlake). Their routine is upended when Humpty's daughter Carolina (Juno Temple) shows up on their doorstep, looking for a place to hide out from her gangster husband who wants her dead for talking to the cops. Carolina catches the eye of Mickey, and Ginny starts to spiral out of control. Also featuring Max Casella, Bobby Slayton, Debi Mazar, Steve Schirripa, David Krumholtz, and Tony Sirico.

Allen does a pastiche of Eugene O'Neill and Tennessee Williams, with sad, desperate characters looking for meaning in their lives. But at least Allen isn't shy about admitting his inspirations, as a character in the film gives the collected works of O'Neill as a gift. Winslet is good, although I had to grow into her performance, which is big and broad. This is one of the first times that I've seen her playing a woman worried about her age (she's turning 40 in the film; Winslet was 41 or 42 when they filmed it). Belushi is another name for the list of performers I never expected to see in a Woody Allen movie, but he fits his role perfectly. Pop singer Timberlake also acquits himself well. If it all doesn't add up to a lot in the end, it's still enough of an interesting character study to be worth a view, as is the colorful, evocative cinematography by Vittorio Storaro.   (7/10)

Source: Universal DVD.

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Lady Bird (2017) - Offbeat coming-of-age comedy from A24 and writer-director Greta Gerwig. It's 2002, and "Lady Bird" McPherson (Saoirse Ronan) is a senior at a private Catholic high school. Her unusual, pretentious manner has made her a bit of an outcast, and longs for nothing more than to got to college far away from her home in Sacramento. The film tracks her relationships with her disapproving mother (Laurie Metcalf), her awkward best friend (Beanie Feldstein), and her first romances with Danny (Lucas Hedges) and Kyle (Timothee Chalamet). Also featuring Tracy Letts, Lois Smith, Stephen Henderson, Odeya Rush, Kathryn Newton, and Jordan Rodrigues. 

Gerwig's semi-autobiographical tale is hilariously painful and touchingly honest. Despite the gender and time period differences, I found much to relate to in the high school drama club scenes, as well as the desire to leave your provincial surroundings in search of something greater. The performances are all very good. Ronan and Metcalf both earned Oscar nominations, but I was equally impressed by Tracy Letts as Lady Bird's quietly warm and supportive father, and Beanie Feldstein (the sister of actor Jonah Hill) as Lady Bird's friend. Recommended.  (8/10)

Source: Lionsgate Blu-ray.

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Is There Own Desire the one where Shearer and Montgomery get stuck on an island in Lake Michigan with everybody looking for them?

There's an early talkie like that, but I can't remember which one it is.

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Tentacles (1977).

Something's killing people off the coast of California.  Journalist John Huston thinks Henry Fonda's company has something to do with it.  Oceanographer Bo Hopkins investigates.  It turns out that something is a giant octopus.  Shelley Winters plays Huston's wife; Cesare Danova is Fonda's flunkie, and Claude Akins is the sheriff.

This is the sort of movie you watch with a bunch of friends and a big bowl of popcorn, laughing at the ludicrousness of it all.  Poor Fonda is underused; Huston isn't directing so he doesn't get to be self-indulgent; and Winters is in typical later career mode.  Winters is also the subject of the film's best lines.  At one point her young son (too young for her; Winters was 56 at the time she made the movie and the kid was 10) and his friend are signing up for the junior regatta, and Winters says she wishes she could be on the boat with them.  The friend replies, "Then we'd need a tornado to move the boat!"  :lol:

5/10.  Not as bad as most reviews would have you believe, but something you watch because it's so dumb.

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Thor: Ragnarok (2017) - Science fiction/fantasy superhero comedy from Disney, Marvel Studios and director Taika Waititi. Thor (Chris Hemsworth) returns to his home realm of Asgard just in time for Hela (Cate Blanchett) the goddess of death, to be unleashed upon the unsuspecting populace. She's determined to rule over Asgard and eventually the rest of the universe, and she sends both Thor and his treacherous half-brother Loki (Tom Hiddleston) across the galaxy to get them out of the way. They land on an alien planet ruled by the Grandmaster (Jeff Goldblum), who forces Thor to fight in a gladiator arena against the planet's champion: the Hulk! Also featuring Tessa Thompson, Mark Ruffalo, Karl Urban, Idris Elba, Benedict Cumberbatch, Rachel House, Tadanobu Asano, Ray Stevenson, Zachary Levi, and Anthony Hopkins.

The Marvel movies have always had comedy, and it was pushed even more to the forefront in the Guardians of the Galaxy movies. With this third entry in the Thor series, they decided to go full comedy, crafting what amounts to a parody of the previous films, with more emphasis on being silly than anything else. That really shouldn't have come as a surprise with the choice of directors, as New Zealander Waititi has helmed several good comedies. The action scenes are still fairly well done, although as usual they begin to resemble nothing more than colorful CGI cartoons in a weightless environment. The newcomers to the Marvel universe include Thompson, playing longtime Marvel heroine Valkyrie, Goldblum as the ancient alien Grandmaster, and Karl Urban as the villainous Skurge the Executioner. Comics purists will bristle at these depictions, as none resemble their print counterparts except in the most superficial ways. Cate Blanchett is also new as Hela, and she seems to have fun as the chief baddie. I enjoyed this movie for the most part, and laughed out loud at a few things, but I also found it a bit disappointing. The retro-80's electro score by Devo's Mark Mothersbaugh was a plus.   (7/10)

Source: Disney Blu-ray.

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2 hours ago, Fedya said:

Is There Own Desire the one where Shearer and Montgomery get stuck on an island in Lake Michigan with everybody looking for them?

There's an early talkie like that, but I can't remember which one it is.

Yes, that's the one.

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20 hours ago, calvinnme said:

Enough said. The mere presence of Joan Collins in a film makes me scurry away. Can't act, can't sing, can't dance, and she ruins "Seven Thieves" by trying to do all of them, overpowering the great Eddie G. with her awfulness. She was great in Dynasty exactly because she was such a bad actress that her interpretation of the role of Alexis in Dynasty was pure camp. Exactly what that 80s soap opera needed as it seemed to be circling the drain after season one. But I digress.

she looks like a hammerhead shark in drag.

love her tho.

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The Great American Broadcast (1941) - Bland musical comedy from 20th Century-Fox and director Archie Mayo. It's 1919, and WW1 veterans Rix Martin (John Payne) and Chuck Hadley (Jack Oakie) run into one another and quickly become friends. Chuck has been dabbling in the nascent world of radio broadcasting as a hobby, but Rix sees some business potential in producing original entertainment programming for radio broadcast. They enlist neighbor and singer Vicki Adams (Alice Faye) to provide some songs, and soon all three are at the forefront of a new world of entertainment, as well as becoming a love triangle. Also featuring Cesar Romero, Mary Beth Hughes, Lucien Littlefield, the Nicholas Brothers, and the Four Ink Spots. 

This is unremarkable, and Faye and Payne bore me. Oakie tries to liven things up, but the material is weak. I liked seeing the Nicholas Brothers and the Four Ink Spots perform, and some vintage footage of Jack Dempsey fighting is interesting. At one point Fritz Lang was set to direct this. I can only imagine what he would have done with this story.  (6/10)

Source: Fox DVD. There's a featurette on the film's making included as a bonus.

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36 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

The Great American Broadcast (1941) - . At one point Fritz Lang was set to direct this. I can only imagine what he would have done with this story.  (6/10)

 

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"You want me to appear in what, Fritz? What do I know about American radio broadcasts? I only know how to kill people who bother me. What do you mean 'Why so uptight?' and 'What's with your eyes?' You're really starting to annoy me!"

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Honk(y) Tonk* (1941) - Western romance from MGM and director Jack Conway. Clark Gable stars as Candy Johnson, a con man who, along with his partner The Sniper (Chill Wills), has just been chased out of another town after a scam was exposed. Candy decides to set up shop in Yellow Creek, a rowdy frontier town currently under the thumb of crooked sheriff Brazos (Albert Dekker). Candy soon finds himself involved with good girl Elizabeth (Lana Turner) and bad girl "Gold Dust" Nelson (Claire Trevor). Also featuring Frank Morgan, Marjorie Main, Henry O'Neill, Veda Ann Borg, Douglas Wood, Betty Blythe, Cy Kendall, and Francis X. Bushman Jr.

This teaming of MGM's biggest male star and their newest female sensation proved to be a massive hit, the second biggest of the year. It has some good points, but it's kind of a mess, and never really gels. Turner looks very beautiful although her acting is a bit stiff. Gable, Trevor, Main, and Wills are all good, though. (6/10)

There are a few choice lines of dialogue. In one scene, Gable is telling Turner all of the "weaknesses" he sees in her, and tells her,"You've got brains, and that ain't womanly."

Later, Turner and Trevor are arguing over who knows Gable the best, and there's this exchange:

Turner: I bet you didn't know that as a kid his nickname was "Fatty".

Trevor: No, it wasn't. It was "Little Stinky".

Turner: It was Fatty!

Trevor: It was Little Stinky!

Gable: You're both wrong. It was Big Stinky!

 

Source: TCM.

*Otto Censor blocks the title.

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On 3/5/2018 at 5:06 PM, EricJ said:

As you can see from the Warner Archive cover, most of Warner's marketable "cult" attention to this title seems to be paid to a young Joan Collins as the requisite Delilah/Bathsheba "Foreign bad-girl" who wants to scheme her way to the Pharoah's treasure that he wants to take with him.

Think a lot of the reputation seems to be that the very name, and the IMDb association with Campy Pop-Culture attracts the, um, er....certain faction of bad-movie fans that go into great self-indulgently superior glees of considering a movie as "Greatest cheeseball turkey ever!", for personal reasons of their own, and those reasons possibly having more to do with the actresses than the actors.  

...I'll leave that for a few of the other posters here to test that theory, though.  ;)

she looks like a hammerhead shark in drag.

(checks off "Experiment: Success" on clipboard)

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I Wake Up Screaming (1941) - Proto-noir mystery from 20th Century-Fox and director H. Bruce Humberstone. Rising actress Vicky Lynn (Carole Landis) is found murdered, and the suspect pool is large. Could it be her manager Frankie (Victor Mature), fading screen star Robin (Alan Mowbray), or reporter Larry (Allyn Joslyn)? Vicky's sister Jill (Betty Grable) tries to help Frankie prove his innocence, but obsessive police detective Cornell (Laird Cregar) won't rest until the culprit is found. Also featuring William Gargan, Elisha Cook Jr., Chick Chandler, Cyril Ring, Charles Lane, and Morris Ankrum.

I saw the 1953 remake Vicki many years ago, so the story didn't really hold any surprises for me. I still enjoyed the noir-ish cinematography, with lots of moody shadows and smoke, and the performance from Laird Cregar was good. The repeated use of "Over the Rainbow" and Alfred Newman's Street Scene score was a little distracting.  (7/10)

Source: Starz Encore Suspense.

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Occasionally when dealing with scores of brand new films (from 2017), as I have been doing for the past nine days, it is sometimes nice to step aside for just a second and rewatch something that made an impact on you. I am mainly a classic film fan, but I have been known to love films from all eras, and, as such,  there is a movie from just a few years ago (2013) that melted my heart on first sight in 2016, and I have always had a special place for ever since. That film was About Time, a lovely, bittersweet  British comedy-drama with romantic and  fantasy elements.

I had  heard about it when it was released 5 years ago, even read a review of it in the newspaper and thought it sounded good. But it vanished at the box office and I forgot all about it by the time it came to DVD. But in early 2016, I found out about it again via a poll of the 100 best films of 2013 held on the old IMDb boards by a friend. And, deciding to give it a whirl, I sent away for it through Netflix DVD. When I watched it, something happened. It hooked me from even the first 30 seconds of its runtime, and kept me there for the rest of it. When it was over, I had laughed, cried, and had been tremendously touched. I quickly sent off for a copy to own, and watched it again in full a few months later, and turned into portions of it whenever it was on TV, savoring it every time.

Which leads me to today. I remembered that the film had just been added to Cinemax and I had some things to do around the house, so I decided to watch a film I loved while doing what I needed to do. As always, after an absence, and having seen many more films since then, I noticed a line or two or a scene that could have easily been cut, but ultimately, it doesn't really matter because the film was just as enchanting and luminous as I remembered.

Richard Curtis, the writer/director had already done fine work on the comedies Four Weddings and a Funeral, Notting Hill, and Love Actually, but he outdid himself here. The script is tender and wise, with charm to spare. The actors and actresses chosen for the roles (Domhnall Gleeson, Rachel McAdams, Bill Nighy, Lydia Wilson, Lindsay Duncan, Margot Robbie) play it note-perfect. And the film trencends the traditional romantic comedy pattern, and becomes a moving story that celebrates not just romantic love, but the love of families as well. This is one special film.

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1 hour ago, LawrenceA said:

I Wake Up Screaming (1941) - Proto-noir mystery from 20th Century-Fox

Source: Starz Encore Suspense.

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I checked this out via the Netflix dvd service a loooong time ago.... the dvd is nice because it had quite a few bonus features (maybe a featurette about the movie too?)

I WAKE UP SCREAMING has a lot of fans here, but I remember disliking it, although I was MOST INTRIGUED by the repeated use of SOMEWHERE OVER THE RAINBOW, I Remember thinking the overall tone was a bit glib.

Definitely what I would try to give it another go though, I read the Steve Fisher novel and liked it

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Keep 'Em Flying (1941) - Military comedy from Universal Pictures and director Arthur Lubin. Carnival workers Blacky Benson (Bud Abbott) and Heathcliff (Lou Costello) get fired and follow their pal Jinx Roberts (Dick Foran), a stunt pilot, in joining the Army Air Corps. While **** and Heathcliff get into all sorts of trouble during flight training, Jinx butts heads with instructor Morrison (William Gargan) since they both pine after the same girl, singer Linda (Carol Bruce). Also featuring Martha Raye as the love interest of Bud and Lou, Charles Lang, William B. Davidson, Truman Bradley, and William Forrest.

Abbott & Costello follow up their huge hits Buck Privates and In the Navy with this slapstick farce/recruitment film for the air corps. The gags of the comedy duo are the usual word play bits, with some of Lou's shouting and some goofy physical gags. The reliance on a standard leading romantic duo (Foran and Bruce) show that Universal still wasn't comfortable letting the boys have full reign in their movies yet. There are also a handful of musical performances to pass the time. This movie ended up being Universal's biggest hit of the year.  (6/10)

Source: Universal DVD.

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34 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

Keep 'Em Flying (1941)

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I loved Bud and Lou when I was a kid, and it seems to me that Keep 'Em Flying came on TV more often than most. I guess I recall it for Martha Raye as twin sisters, one brash, the other reserved, more than anything else.

In retrospect, having seen all their films again within the past decade or so they now leave me fairly cold. With two exceptions: A & C Meet Frankenstein is still a marvel, and deserves to be ranked as a classic. Their other good one is less well remembered but still a charmer: The Time of their Lives, with Lou and Marjorie Reynolds as a pair of ghosts from the Revolutionary War haunting a 1946 house, which has Bud as a modern descendant of a louse who had abused Lou 150 years before. This film has one of Costello's most affecting performances, as it successfully mixes sentiment with its slapstick.

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6 minutes ago, TomJH said:

In retrospect, having seen all their films again within the past decade or so they now leave me fairly cold. With two exceptions: A & C Meet Frankenstein is still a marvel, and deserves to be ranked as a classic. Their other good one is less well remembered but still a charmer: The Time of their Lives, with Lou and Marjorie Reynolds as a pair of ghosts from the Revolutionary War haunting a 1946 house, which has Bud as a modern descendant of a louse who had abused Lou 150 years before. This film has one of Costello's most affecting performances, as it successfully mixes sentiment with its slapstick.

Yeah, I've seen those two more than once. I've seen most of A & C's movies, but I'm trying to catch the ones I missed years ago. They can be very hit-and-miss. I laugh sometimes, but when Costello starts howling it gets old fast. I think I have 6 or 7 more A & C movies in my pile of stuff to watch.

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Let's Go Collegiate (1941) - Youth-appeal musical comedy from Monogram Pictures and director Jean Yarbrough. Frankie (Frankie Darro) and Tad (Jackie Moran) are college friends and members of the rowing team. They've got a big party planned for the arrival of a new member of the team, but when they learn that he's been drafted by the Army, the boys decide to pass off a lunk-headed crook named Herk (Frank Sully) as the new member. They don't want to disappoint their sorority member girlfriends, but their ruse means they have to try and pass off Herk as a college student and a capable member of the rowing team. Also featuring Gale Storm, Marcia Mae Jones, Mantan Moreland, Frank Faylen, Billy Griffith, Barton Yarborough, Tristram Coffin, and Keye Luke.

This is minor, instantly forgettable fluff, although it's interesting to see the differences in "college life" between then and now. Gale Storm sings a couple of songs, Mantan Moreland has a couple of good lines, and the whole thing runs about an hour.  (5/10)

Source: Mill Creek DVD.

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Let's Go Collegiate:  Frankie Darro was an excellent kid actor back in the 1930s.  I'm not familiar with this movie but I love the multi racial poster.

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8 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Yeah, I've seen those two more than once. I've seen most of A & C's movies, but I'm trying to catch the ones I missed years ago. They can be very hit-and-miss. I laugh sometimes, but when Costello starts howling it gets old fast. I think I have 6 or 7 more A & C movies in my pile of stuff to watch.

When those A & C collections were released by Universal on DVD I got them all (there were four). But one film that didn't get released (for copyright reasons) was It Ain't Hay, a racetrack comedy. Universal later did release it and when I finally saw it it lumped right in with all their other comedies in quality. It only ran about 75 minutes or so, but it seemed like a long 75 minutes to me.

Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein remains their crowning jewel. There was no film I liked more as a kid and it remains a great favourite of mine today. Much of that, of course, is due to the three horror stars in it, but I think that Bud and Lou were also at their peak here as a team. It was also the last time in his career that Bela Lugosi was allowed to shine. His second outing as Dracula is one of his great performances.

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10 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I checked this out via the Netflix dvd service a loooong time ago.... the dvd is nice because it had quite a few bonus features (maybe a featurette about the movie too?)

I WAKE UP SCREAMING has a lot of fans here, but I remember disliking it, although I was MOST INTRIGUED by the repeated use of SOMEWHERE OVER THE RAINBOW, I Remember thinking the overall tone was a bit glib.

Definitely what I would try to give it another go though, I read the Steve Fisher novel and liked it

Remember the next time you watch it that it was released just after The Maltese Falcon on Halloween, October, 31st, 1941. Its one of those films that don't fit the paradigm touted over and over that it was the German Expressionist directors combined with the hardboiled stories of the thirties that gave us "Film Noir" as we know it. A lot of the "look" was as also influenced by the sensational tabloid photo journalist images think WeeGee, and by the very real econmic necessities imposed by the electrical blackout regulations imposed by WWII. Most of the lighting went towards the big budget "A" pictures.

"The biggest problem of some critics and chroniclers of Noir with the film I Wake Up Screaming is that they don't know how to categorize it. It doesn't fit the carefully crafted "German Expressionism" influence scenario that they have worked out as the origin of Noir. It's Director H. Bruce Humberstone, never made another Noir, it's brilliant cinematographer, Edward Cronjager, never filmed another Noir so conceptually and visually it's a one off, one of a kind.

I'm calling it a seminal "Gateway Noir" because the film serves the same purpose as a gateway drug, it functions as a sort of gateway to Noir for those unfamiliar, at that point in time, with what eventually came to be known stylistically, and hard boiled narratively, as Films Noir.

Look at the film in chronological context, only Stranger On The Third Floor (1940) approaches it in Noir visual stylistics, while The Maltese Falcon (1941) released only twenty eight days ahead of it on October 3, has the hard boiled story by Dashiell Hammett, but barely any of the signature visual stylistics. I Wake up Screaming not only was based on the hard boiled novel by Steve Fisher and also has the brilliant Noir stylistics in abundance but it has much much more. You can say that the film has dissociative identity, multiple genres if you will. It's also a bit of a Screwball Comedy, a Romantic Drama, and almost a Musical. This seamless genre bending provides the "gateway" for Comedy, Romance, and Musical audiences at that time into the films that eventually will be pigeonholed into the future Noir cycle." 

(source Noirsville)

 

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8 hours ago, TomJH said:

I loved Bud and Lou when I was a kid, and it seems to me that Keep 'Em Flying came on TV more often than most. I guess I recall it for Martha Raye as twin sisters, one brash, the other reserved, more than anything else.

In retrospect, having seen all their films again within the past decade or so they now leave me fairly cold. With two exceptions: A & C Meet Frankenstein is still a marvel, and deserves to be ranked as a classic. Their other good one is less well remembered but still a charmer: The Time of their Lives, with Lou and Marjorie Reynolds as a pair of ghosts from the Revolutionary War haunting a 1946 house, which has Bud as a modern descendant of a louse who had abused Lou 150 years before. This film has one of Costello's most affecting performances, as it successfully mixes sentiment with its slapstick.

I loved them too, A & C Meet Frankenstein, and The Time of their Lives I agree with you on, I'll add Hold That Ghost, A & C Meet the Mummy (with Marie Windsor BTW) to my list.

But my fondest memories of the team though are from their 1952 to 1954, half-hour TV series, The Abbott and Costello Show. It really gave you a feel for more of their vaudeville backgrounds, with all their various routines, and the routines of their vaudeville background costars, Sidney Fields (Mr. Fields, and his various relatives), Joe Besser (Stinky Davis), Joe Kirk (Mr. Bacciagalupe).

TV in the 1950s ealy 60s was filled with Abbott & Costello. B)

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42 minutes ago, cigarjoe said:

I loved them too, A & C Meet Frankenstein, and The Time of their Lives I agree with you on, I'll add Hold That Ghost, A & C Meet the Mummy (with Marie Windsor BTW) to my list.

But my fondest memories of the team though are from their 1952 to 1954, half-hour TV series, The Abbott and Costello Show. It really gave you a feel for more of their vaudeville backgrounds, with all their various routines, and the routines of their vaudeville background costars, Sidney Fields (Mr. Fields, and his various relatives), Joe Besser (Stinky Davis), Joe Kirk (Mr. Bacciagalupe).

TV in the 1950s ealy 60s was filled with Abbott & Costello. B)

And don't forget, too, the contribution of classy Hillary Brooke in the A & C TV series. Brooke would later state that Bud and Lou played a lot of practical jokes on the sets of the series, but they never did it with her. She said she would have loved it if they had done it. I wonder if Bud and, particularly, Lou thought her too much a lady, to be the butt of their joking around. Brooke adored working with the boys.

I agree that the series and many of the vaudeville routines seen in their films still provide a glimpse and feel for modern audiences of what vaudeville must have been like regarding the comics. But there's an irony here. Lou didn't like the script for A & C Meet Frankenstein (originally called The Brain of Frankenstein) and a key reason for that, I believe, was that it didn't allow them the same opportunity for so many of their stage shtick routines.

So you'd include A & C Meet the Mummy as a favourite, would you, cigarjoe? I suspect, after all your film noir watching, you're just Marie Windsor crazy (which is a pretty easy way to get, I must admit).

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1 hour ago, cigarjoe said:

Remember the next time you watch [I WAKE UP SCREAMING, 1941] that it was released just after The Maltese Falcon on Halloween, October, 31st, 1941. Its one of those films that don't fit the paradigm touted over and over that it was the German Expressionist directors combined with the hardboiled stories of the thirties that gave us "Film Noir" as we know it. A lot of the "look" was as also influenced by the sensational tabloid photo journalist images think WeeGee, and by the very real econmic necessities imposed by the electrical blackout regulations imposed by WWII. Most of the lighting went towards the big budget "A" pictures.

Now, I like STRANGER ON THE THIRD FLOOR quite a bit- in spite of the ending.

I did not care for I WAKE UP SCREAMING - AGAIN: as I recall, and it's been a while since my initial viewing of the film on dvd, although I think TCM ran it some time in the last 3-5 years (as a Bob's Pick?) and I watched part of it then and had some of the same issues with it that i had the first time.

which were:

 it's an unfortunate result of doing something new and innovative that it is so emulated over the passing of time that when someone discovers it decades later, they've seen everything its influenced  a hundred times over and thus (cruelly) something that was actually quite new at the time it came out is now rendered the oldest of oldest.

Coming to I WAKE UP SCREAMING after seeing LAURA and FALLEN ANGEL and lots of other films noir and melos and films on HOLLYWOOD that it perhaps suggested (ALL ABOUT EVE  a touch?) it seemed like it had been done before. Unfairly I'm sure

but what really bothered me was the tone of the movie- the way i recall, a lot of the dialogue is handled as though this were a comedy, i kept half expecting the characters to kidnap Kay Kyser and "put on a show!"; and there was a persistent callousness with regard to the murder victim that- while maybe intended- was so prevelent and almost clumsily inserted with such an insistance  that it bothered me and came off as a bit demeaning, also also factoring in what i know about the tragic end of Carole Landis.

it seems as if I WAKE UP SCREAMING doesn't want to take itself seriously, and even for a film about HOLLYWOOD, it lacks a general sense of being genuine.

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eta: I cannot remember if I WAKE UP SCREAMING is one of the films in which VICTOR MATURE sucks or is good in, I'm tempted to say he probably was still unsteady as an actor as this was around the same time he did THE SHANGHAI GESTURE.

(He got a lot better though!)

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