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I Just Watched...

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3 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

 

But my fondest memories of the team though are from their 1952 to 1954, half-hour TV series, The Abbott and Costello Show. It really gave you a feel for more of their vaudeville backgrounds, with all their various routines, and the routines of their vaudeville background costars, Sidney Fields (Mr. Fields, and his various relatives), Joe Besser (Stinky Davis), Joe Kirk (Mr. Bacciagalupe).

 

Let's not forget Bobby Barber, bit player extraordinaire, who always seem to turn up on their films, as well as the television episodes.

During the first day of shooting Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein, Barber hid in the rafters and dropped an egg on the head of director Charles Barton. He was also prone to ruining a take by running through a scene, wearing shorts, and yelling “Fellows, be quiet. I can’t sleep!”

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2 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

it's an unfortunate result of doing something new and innovative that it is so emulated over the passing of time that when someone discovers it decades later, they've seen everything its influenced  a hundred times over and thus (cruelly) something that was actually quite new at the time it came out is now rendered the oldest of oldest.

That's the main reason why I watch movies in year order for the most part. It's easier to appreciate when a story or stylistic touch is original or distinctive for the time it was released. 

I didn't view the movie as too comedic. There were a lot of wisecracks, but it fit with the movie, I thought. Mature wasn't bad, but his character wasn't very likable, either, which was a nice change of pace from all of the squeaky-clean protagonists of most movies of the period. 

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I'm not a big Abbott and Costello fan myself, but I have to admit I do get a kick out of A&C MEET FRANKENSTEIN.

Though I have to wonder if maybe Dracula himself didn't need a brain transplant if he believed not-so-bright Lou would be the 'perfect' choice for the Monster's new brain.:D

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1 hour ago, scsu1975 said:

Let's not forget Bobby Barber, bit player extraordinaire, who always seem to turn up on their films, as well as the television episodes.

During the first day of shooting Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein, Barber hid in the rafters and dropped an egg on the head of director Charles Barton. He was also prone to ruining a take by running through a scene, wearing shorts, and yelling “Fellows, be quiet. I can’t sleep!”

 

Rich, I don't know if you have Universal's single disk DVD release of A & C Meet Frankenstein. It has a Bonus Feature section with a documentary on the making of the film. The documentary is on You Tube.

Bobby Barber's role as court jester for Bud and Lou is brought up. It includes an outtake from Meet Frankenstein with Lugosi coming down the stairs at the castle, with Bud and Lou and a number of other cast members at the bottom of the stairs. But little Bobby Barber can be seen walking down the stairs following Lugosi. He has a hat pulled down over his head and a black cloak around him, not unlike the way Lon Chaney appeared in Phantom of the Opera.

Anyway Bud and Lou and others at the bottom of the stairs are breaking up and you see Lugosi, obviously surprised, turning around and start to address Barber. The outtake ends there and you don't know what Lugosi said, of course, but he doesn't look happy. He was a one take professional who did not appreciate joking around when he had to deliver his dialogue or do a scene. At the same time he apparently did enjoy the antics on the set as long as it didn't involve any of his scenes.

I found this shot which shows that Lugosi could join in on the fun when Barber was the victim:

836a0d89b96f0a4ab161aae41c339bf5.jpg

Barber also appears in the final film very briefly in a scene with Lon Chaney (Barber's the short one on the right).

characterpic024.jpg

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1 hour ago, Bethluvsfilms said:

I'm not a big Abbott and Costello fan myself, but I have to admit I do get a kick out of A&C MEET FRANKENSTEIN.

Though I have to wonder if maybe Dracula himself didn't need a brain transplant if he believed not-so-bright Lou would be the 'perfect' choice for the Monster's new brain.:D

Yeah, that one is decent to watch on Halloween but I'm not a big fan of most of their films.

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5 hours ago, TomJH said:

I agree that the series and many of the vaudeville routines seen in their films still provide a glimpse and feel for modern audiences of what vaudeville must have been like regarding the comics. But there's an irony here.

Not vaudeville, but burlesque--There's a difference.  ;)

Vaudeville might be a duo routine, like their playing "Who's On First?" to a vaudie audience in Naughty Nineties.  But the kind of burlesque played at Minsky's was a more improvised "comic jazz", where there were a certain number of set comic sketches, that proceeded to be destroyed by walk-ons, ad-libs and whatever random gags struck the comics' fancies to pad it out--The style generally took the form of the two characters (A as the city-slicker sharpie and C as the lovable motormouthed/obnoxious child-like nebbish who gets all the good one-liners off the sharpie) trying to do some simple task on the street corner, while bit players, like Barber, barge in, do one crazy gag, and run off again, leaving the comic to react.

Burlesque was dying by the forties after LaGuardia outlawed the theaters, which were moving to movies anyway, so A&C deliberately looked for excuses to preserve their Minsky's classics by writing them into their movies--If you know the two styles, that's the appeal of A&C movies.  THE classic burlesque routine every banana had to know was the "Nuthouse" sketch that Costello does in Ride 'Em Cowboy, but you can get a clearer taste of classic walk-on-traffic burley-Q when A&C used In Society to enshrine the Susquehanna Hat Company routine for posterity:

Quote

Lou didn't like the script for A & C Meet Frankenstein (originally called The Brain of Frankenstein) and a key reason for that, I believe, was that it didn't allow them the same opportunity for so many of their stage shtick routines.

The original script was studio-written, and reportedly had an ending where A&C defeat Dracula and the monsters with a mad-scientist's shrink ray.  Lou makes money showing the monsters in a flea circus, but the only antidote to the ray is pickle juice, and Lou was keeping the monsters in his lunchbox...

Lou reportedly took one look at the script and said "My kid could write a better one!", and A&C took over the writing, since they were thinking of doing a stage show with the Monsters already.  (The bit where Frankenstein is scared by his first look at Lou was a frequent stage gag.)

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Just checked out I WAKE UP SCREAMING. I liked it better, it’s got its pluses. 

Victore Mature was really good, the lighting also and photography too- And whatever other faults the director may have had, at least he wasn’t scared to move the camera and keep the shots brisk. I always enjoy what little (ironically) we have of Laird Cregar left to enjoy. 

God I have STREET SCENE stuck in my head now....

 

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Ps- ironically THE HOT SPOT -Which was the original (?)  title – would’ve been more appropriate than I WAKE UP SCREAMING 

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Love Crazy (1941) - Romantic comedy from MGM and director Jack Conway. Steve (William Powell) and Susan Ireland (Myrna Loy) are set to celebrate their fourth wedding anniversary when everything that could go wrong does, and a series of misunderstandings leads to Susan wanting a divorce. Steve will stop at nothing to get her back, even if it means pretending to be crazy to stall the divorce proceedings. Also featuring Jack Carson, Florence Bates, Gail Patrick, Sidney Blackmer, Sig Ruman, Vladimir Sokoloff, Elisha Cook Jr., Donald MacBride, Sara Haden, George Meeker, Clarence Muse, Ian Wolfe, and Edward Van Sloan.

This is a real showcase for Powell, who gets to run the gamut of suave to silly, even going so far as to shave off his signature mustache to appear in drag. He and Loy have their usual excellent chemistry, and while her role is less showy than his, she's still memorable. Jack Carson and Florence Bates are both good at being unlikable, and they exploit that here. Even if some of the situations stretch credulity, the movie is still funny.  (7/10)

Source: Warner DVD.

love-crazy-william-powell-myrna-loy-1941

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20 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

Love Crazy (1941) -

 

love-crazy-william-powell-myrna-loy-1941

A comedy that no fan of Powell and Loy should miss.

tumblr_nnr5q3p3X41tujnioo1_250.gif

tumblr_np2tawvrye1s2f16eo1_400.gif

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3 hours ago, TomJH said:

Rich, I don't know if you have Universal's single disk DVD release of A & C Meet Frankenstein. It has a Bonus Feature section with a documentary on the making of the film. The documentary is on You Tube.

Bobby Barber's role as court jester for Bud and Lou is brought up. It includes an outtake from Meet Frankenstein with Lugosi coming down the stairs at the castle, with Bud and Lou and a number of other cast members at the bottom of the stairs. But little Bobby Barber can be seen walking down the stairs following Lugosi. He has a hat pulled down over his head and a black cloak around him, not unlike the way Lon Chaney appeared in Phantom of the Opera.

Anyway Bud and Lou and others at the bottom of the stairs are breaking up and you see Lugosi, obviously surprised, turning around and start to address Barber. The outtake ends there and you don't know what Lugosi said, of course, but he doesn't look happy. He was a one take professional who did not appreciate joking around when he had to deliver his dialogue or do a scene. At the same time he apparently did enjoy the antics on the set as long as it didn't involve any of his scenes.

I found this shot which shows that Lugosi could join in on the fun when Barber was the victim:

836a0d89b96f0a4ab161aae41c339bf5.jpg

Barber also appears in the final film very briefly in a scene with Lon Chaney (Barber's the short one on the right).

characterpic024.jpg

I don't have the dvd; in fact, I own very few. But I have seen that clip, probably in a blooper reel.

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6 hours ago, EricJ said:

Not vaudeville, but burlesque--There's a difference.  ;)

Vaudeville might be a duo routine, like their playing "Who's On First?" to a vaudie audience in Naughty Nineties.  But the kind of burlesque played at Minsky's was a more improvised "comic jazz", where there were a certain number of set comic sketches, that proceeded to be destroyed by walk-ons, ad-libs and whatever random gags struck the comics' fancies to pad it out--The style generally took the form of the two characters (A as the city-slicker sharpie and C as the lovable motormouthed/obnoxious child-like nebbish who gets all the good one-liners off the sharpie) trying to do some simple task on the street corner, while bit players, like Barber, barge in, do one crazy gag, and run off again, leaving the comic to react.

Burlesque was dying by the forties after LaGuardia outlawed the theaters, which were moving to movies anyway, so A&C deliberately looked for excuses to preserve their Minsky's classics by writing them into their movies--If you know the two styles, that's the appeal of A&C movies.  THE classic burlesque routine every banana had to know was the "Nuthouse" sketch that Costello does in Ride 'Em Cowboy, but you can get a clearer taste of classic walk-on-traffic burley-Q when A&C used In Society to enshrine the Susquehanna Hat Company routine for posterity:

The original script was studio-written, and reportedly had an ending where A&C defeat Dracula and the monsters with a mad-scientist's shrink ray.  Lou makes money showing the monsters in a flea circus, but the only antidote to the ray is pickle juice, and Lou was keeping the monsters in his lunchbox...

Lou reportedly took one look at the script and said "My kid could write a better one!", and A&C took over the writing, since they were thinking of doing a stage show with the Monsters already.  (The bit where Frankenstein is scared by his first look at Lou was a frequent stage gag.)

Thanks for the correction, and the clip. Reminds me of the Niagara Falls routine.

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Just got done watching ANNE OF THE THOUSAND DAYS, starring Richard Burton as Henry VIII and Genevieve Bujold as Anne Boleyn.

I've heard many people call it a 'borefeast' but I actually found it quite an interesting film. Burton is great as always as England's most notorious king and Bujold more than holds her own with him, especially at the ending where just before she is led to the scaffold, she tells him off.

I would have thought this might have been the film that would have finally won Burton the Oscar, but he lost to John Wayne for TRUE GRIT. As much as I like the Duke, I have to say that Burton outedged him in this. 

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7 hours ago, EricJ said:

Not vaudeville, but burlesque--There's a difference.  ;)

 

 

Yeh, I guess you're right. Thanks for the information.

That reminds me that back in the '70s I went to a Toronto strip joint (Starvin' Marvin's) which had a comic, Rummy Bishop, on the stage introducing various strippers. I have to seriously wonder how many standup comics could still get gigs of that nature at that time. He had to be one of the last of a breed, though he still appeared in some films and television.

Maybe ten years ago or so I encountered Bishop walking along the street and told him how much I had enjoyed his act. We talked for a minute or so and he seemed to appreciate still being recognized.

rummy-bishop-87.6.jpg

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Moon Over Miami (1941) - Technicolor musical romantic comedy from 20th Century-Fox and director Walter Lang. Kay (Betty Grable) and Barbara (Carole Landis) are sisters working in a Texas burger joint. They decide to head to Miami with their aunt Susan (Charlotte Greenwood) to hunt for a rich husband. Kay pretends to be a wealthy heiress, while Barbara pretends to be a her personal secretary and Susan is the housekeeper. They check into a posh hotel, and Kay soon lands two admirers: Phil (Don Ameche) and Jeffrey (Bob Cummings). Also featuring Jack Haley, Cobina Wright, Lynne Roberts, Robert Conway, George Lessey, and Robert Greig.

This is upbeat, colorful fluff that's entertaining in a very undemanding way. Grable and Landis are both lovely. Betty shows off her gift for comedy, while Carole plays the meeker, more demure role. Greenwood is a hoot, especially in her scenes with Jack Haley. There are sequences that were shot in Ocala, Florida, not far from where I live now.   (6/10)

Source: Fox DVD.

moon-over-miami_u-L-F4SAAX0.jpg?src=gp&w

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1 hour ago, Bethluvsfilms said:

Just got done watching ANNE OF THE THOUSAND DAYS, starring Richard Burton as Henry VIII and Genevieve Bujold as Anne Boleyn.

I've heard many people call it a 'borefeast' but I actually found it quite an interesting film. Burton is great as always as England's most notorious king and Bujold more than holds her own with him, especially at the ending where just before she is led to the scaffold, she tells him off.

I would have thought this might have been the film that would have finally won Burton the Oscar, but he lost to John Wayne for TRUE GRIT. As much as I like the Duke, I have to say that Burton outedged him in this. 

I think she shoulda kept her head and given in.

:lol:

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June Night (1940) - Swedish melodrama from director Per Lindberg. Kertsen Norback (Ingrid Bergman) is shot in the chest by her emotionally unstable boyfriend Nils (Gunnar Sjoberg). The bullet grazes her heart, but she survives, only to become the subject of a nationwide public scandal when Nils is put on trial and their unmarried status is brought up. After the trial, Kersten moves to Stockholm under an assumed name and tries to start a new life, but the demons of her past are always at her heels. Also featuring Marianne Lofgren, Lill-Tollie Zellman, Marianne Aminoff, Olof Wdgren, Gabriel Alw, and Carl Strom. 

This is more soap opera hysterics than a serious examination of guilt and living under the specter of notoriety. Bergman is beautiful, and her performance is decent, but she is still rough around the edges. I liked Lofgren as Asa the nurse who lends a helping hand and suffers for it. In fact, the way she's treated, and the film's resolution, bothered me a bit, and it casts a dubious morality over the whole affair. I was amused by Strom as the gifted surgeon who saves Bergman's life with a delicate heart operation at the film's start. Every other scene with Strom, it appears he's suffering from terrible hand tremors, so his casting as a surgeon elicited some chuckles.  (6/10)

Source: FilmStruck.

juninatten-687134649-large.jpg

Film_E46_JuneNight_original.jpg

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2 hours ago, NipkowDisc said:

I think she shoulda kept her head and given in.

:lol:

Her head was but frail because she couldn't give forth ... a male heir.

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1 hour ago, LawrenceA said:

June Night (1940) - Swedish melodrama from director Per Lindberg. ...

I am yearning for this one. NetF is a no go. It's on the tube for money. Hmmm ...

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On 2/28/2018 at 7:38 PM, Thenryb said:

I am kind of with your kids on this. I have not been a movie collector over the years and really do not want to start collecting actual physical discs now. This desire not to own movie discs can be frustrating since I frequently run across a movie I want to see which is not available anywhere online (e.g. Resurrection with Ellen Burstyn which I finally found uploaded to youtube in a very fuzzy version).

For me

 

1 hour ago, laffite said:

I am yearning for this one. NetF is a no go. It's on the tube for money. Hmmm ...

Was going to say I had not heard of this one.  I would love to see it too!  If ever I find it will certainly get back with you!

1 hour ago, laffite said:

I am yearning for this one. NetF is a no go. It's on the tube for money. Hmmm ...

 

1 hour ago, laffite said:

I am yearning for this one. NetF is a no go. It's on the tube for money. Hmmm ...

it is fun to select a favorite like an Bette Davis,

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Broadway Bad  I wondered how so many Warner's stars ended up in this 1933 pre-code Fox drama..but it doesn't matter..I looked for a good copy of this to stream for a while, finally found it using a Kodi search.  It begins with a scene that looks like the rail car number in 42nd Street--chorus girls in their lingerie hanging around and from the berths.  Joan Blondell stars as a naive girl who believed Ricardo Cortez was minding her meager inheritance when his real interests were, well, elsewhere.  The other chorus girls tease her for her lack of 'street smarts', and Adrienne Ames is jealous of the interest Cortez shows her.  Her only friend is Ginger Rogers, who gets shamefully little screen time to develop her wise-cracking character.  Blondell meets with an old sweetheart, entitled preppy Allen Vincent, and (this part is a little muddled) they secretly marry.  Vincent discovers Blondell with Cortez, and won't believe how innocent the whole situation is, so he coldly divorces her.  Because Cortez wouldn't back her up, Blondell switches from broken hearted sweet to cold hearted savvy, and uses her new noteriety to further her career and her finances.  But there is another man in her life..her son (this is a little vague too--he's 4 when we finally see the little boy) and she leads a double life as hardened performer during the week, and weekend mama.  When her rather despicable ex owes big money for gambling debts that his rich family won't pay, he has the nerve to ask her for help.  She turns him down, but worries that he'll find out about the child.  She has made her peace with Cortez at this point, and he advises to go abroad, but Vincent  takes the boy, and his rich daddy wants to keep 'his grandson' away from that scandalous show girl, Blondell.  The film is an interesting mix of back stage drama/comedy and the familiar 'taking a child from it's mother' tear jerker plotline.  Above all, it truly is a great performance from Blondell, who doesn't over-play innocent or brassy, but merges the two seamlessly in her character.                                                                                                    Related image

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On ‎3‎/‎1‎/‎2018 at 10:58 AM, LornaHansonForbes said:

I bet you can't get CALIGULA at the library.

The Northwest is progressive, but it's not that progressive!

Out of curiosity, I did a search on terrarium for this..got over 3 dozen links..I don't get why so many people are scared to use technology..I haven't turned on my blue ray player in a couple of years...everything I have I can push a button and watch.  At the very least, a simple application like teatv runs well on windows, and although it can't find what android apks can, it does okay for newer content.  Most of that stuff you got from Netflix dvd's is on servers somewhere, and it's not that hard to find...and it's all free, folks.

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5 hours ago, shutoo said:

[in re: locating a complete print of CALIGULA (1979)] Out of curiosity, I did a search on terrarium for this..got over 3 dozen links..I don't get why so many people are scared to use technology..I haven't turned on my blue ray player in a couple of years...everything I have I can push a button and watch.  At the very least, a simple application like teatv runs well on windows, and although it can't find what android apks can, it does okay for newer content.  Most of that stuff you got from Netflix dvd's is on servers somewhere, and it's not that hard to find...and it's all free, folks.

 

 

The only cost, of course,

IS YOUR IMMORTAL SOUL, MWAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA (coughcough, sorry, pollen season) HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA....

FloweryWelcomeAfricanfisheagle-size_rest

(If you have any shreds of soul left after sitting through CALIGULA, check out ILSA: SHE WOLF OF THE SS, that should kill the remaining bits and pieces.)

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56 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

The only cost, of course,

IS YOUR IMMORTAL SOUL

Well, I could've pointed out there are over 60 links to stream The Greatest Story Ever Told, but that's not what they were looking for...

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Through A Glass Darkly (1961)

New York's Film Forum is having a Ingmar Bergman retrospective this month. I saw this one On Demand the other day. I thought it was quite good, though not one of my favorite Bergman films (Fanny And Alexander and The Seventh Seal). Sometimes his films grow on me, so maybe I will revisit this one again.

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