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speedracer5

I Just Watched...

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I've rarely written in this marvelous topic/.forum/thread,etc  But just felt the need to try it & write of a couple brand new docu's I saw within the last couple of weeks. Both though were on HBO, the first that aired was almost as incredible as it's person it was about "ANDRE THE GIANT"  Not only a must see of course for fans of professional wrestling-(which I was as a teen), but for anyone in general! They always fib about a wrestler's actual size, listing Hulk Hogan as always being 6'8, when he even recently said he was now barely 6'4 & 1/2-(pt of it is due to his spinal damage)  But, as for ANDRE, the didn;'t have to hype his massive size up one bit! He truly was 7'4 inches & went in the lbs from 480lbs to approx. 600lbs when he suddenly passed away of a massive heart attack on his farm in N. Carolina in 1993 age 46. He knew for many yrs he was dying-(GIANT'S DISAEASE") so literally first tried to drink himself to death & never stopped! I first got to see this bohemeth very close around 1975-(about age 10) in a dumpy place in Philly called "The Arena" & first thing that struck me was the sheer size of his head. Back then the good & bad guys would come out of separate entrances. He was the good guy back then. Very 1st Wrestler I saw as me & my pal entered the arena was "Rowdy" Roddy Piper-(also already gone) Then we-(my friends & mother were with me) really got to see/view him very, very close in Asbury Park, NJ & it was actually in a high school auditorium. ANDRE was in a tag team match & he was for virtually entire match in our corner, about 1`0ft from our frt row chairs. Also saw him & dig this VS. Hogan back around 1981 in "Shea Stadium"-(lousy place for sports, planes flying over & they then had all leave for the train through same entrance!?) & despite as Vince McMahon says, everything that occurs in the past in the game, never did, to build the hype for the next big thing. Hogan body slammed him  back then & in their final match, where ANDRE was now the villain & Hulk the good guy of course-(1980's & McMahon reinvented it all) & as far as anyone knew or knows unlike almost all of these athletes, he never even worked-out,etc & in order to pass the torch, ANDRE lost deliberately in this 1987 final match. Of course it's fixed & mostly fake, but often they don't know entire outcome & as this docu shows, they even have scripts. The show shows all of this & a lot more of course. Hulk kept worrying & nagging him about the ending & ANDRE would just play cards in the dressing rm & say "Don't worry About It" Born in France & strangely none of his family had same disease though. & as most know-(also a great pt of this docu) his most famous film role was in R. Reiner's fun (***) 1987 "The Princess Bride" ($31m.) also a cameo in '84';s "Micki & Maude" & played "Bigfoot" on TV's "Six Million Dollar Man"-(something Hollywood wanted to make for decades now?) It sadly goes on about his flying/tours & such & his ever increasing pain!   CHECK IT OUT  (Overall a strong ***1/2-out of 4 stars)

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22 minutes ago, Bethluvsfilms said:

You know what? I may have to change what I said about Kim not being one of my favs, because I DID love her work in L.A. CONFIDENTIAL as well as in NADINE and THE DOOR IN THE FLOOR.

FOOL FOR LOVE, I felt she did good work in that too, even if the movie itself was kind of blah for me.

I even liked her in Tim Burton's 1989 BATMAN. 

Guess I like Kim more than I thought.

OOPS, how could I 4-get her in 1989 wonderful "Batman" ($251m.) In our current pathetic moviegoing era, with sequels, rehashes, comic books,etc I still think Tim Burton's first from '89 was great & entertaining fun & of course w/*JACK AS "THE JOKER!" I still rate his over *Oscar winning-(posthumously) *Heath Ledger's very strong & more evil turn though.  However, of all lady screamers in THE M.O.V.I.E.S. *Kim may take the cake in it as Vicky Vale

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   I had listed (2) new & special tv documentaries/movies to cover here, but may wait for the other?

 

THANK YOU

By the way-(hope I spell it a ok?) ANDRE'S real name was Andre Russimoff) & privately had his ashes scattered on his beloved farm

 

(ALSO: Does anyone know of any other pictures he appeared-in?)

 

 

Many celebs besides pro=-wrestlers are interviewed:  Billy Crystal, Rob Reiner, Robin Wright-Penn-(at least I think it may still be Penn? I know she's not hitched to *Sean anymore though), Cary Elwes, family members, including his only daughter of whom it says he left everything to) 

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42 minutes ago, spence said:

OOPS, how could I 4-get her in 1989 wonderful "Batman" ($251m.) In our current pathetic moviegoing era, with sequels, rehashes, comic books,etc I still think Tim Burton's first from '89 was great & entertaining fun & of course w/*JACK AS "THE JOKER!" I still rate his over *Oscar winning-(posthumously) *Heath Ledger's very strong & more evil turn though.  However, of all lady screamers in THE M.O.V.I.E.S. *Kim may take the cake in it as Vicky Vale

Good as Heath was, my favorite Joker will always be Jack. And yes, for queen of screams in the original BATMAN franchise of the 80's and 90's, nobody beats Kim.

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Northern Pursuit (1943) - Wartime suspense adventure from Warner Brothers and director Raoul Walsh. In the frigid Canadian north, German-descent RCMP officer Steve Wagner (Errol Flynn) pretends to turn traitor in order to infiltrate a gang of Nazi saboteurs led by Col. Hugo von Keller (Helmut Dantine). Also featuring Julie Bishop, Gene Lockhart, John Ridgely, Tom Tully, Bernard Nedell, Warren Douglas, Monte Blue, Alec Craig, Robert Hutton, Jay Silverheels, Tom Drake, and John Forsythe in his debut.

Flynn was fresh from his courtroom scandal when this was released, and the added publicity helped make this a big hit. It's an entertaining adventure film, with some nice location photography, even if none of it was actually shot in Canada. Flynn doesn't have to stretch much to play his hero role, but he's still good in it. I also liked Dantine, who often played more complex Nazi characters than the usual mustache-twirling villains.   (7/10)

Source: TCM.

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Old Acquaintance (1943) - Melodrama from Warner Brothers and director Vincent Sherman. Kit Marlowe (Bette Davis) and Millie Drake (Miriam Hopkins) have been friends since childhood. They reconnect after many years, as Kit has become a successful author, while Millie is getting married to Preston Drake (John Loder). The two women's friendship shows some strain, though, as the years have changed them both a bit, a situation that is only exacerbated as the years go on. Also featuring Gig Young, Dolores Moran, Phillip Reed, Roscoe Karns, Anne Revere, Esther Dale, Ann Doran, and Philip Van Zandt.

I wasn't quite sure how to take this movie. Was it a serious drama, or a hysterical camp fest? Can it be both? Davis isn't bad, although she displays a lot of the mannered speaking and body language that would make her a favorite of celebrity impressionists. Hopkins is a completely over-the-top ham, and I'm not sure how much was intended by the script/director/producer. Her character is supposed to be an overwrought, neurotic mess, but Hopkins takes it to cartoon levels, and when Davis finally shakes some sense into her, it's a comical scene, to me anyway. Dolores Moran, playing the grown daughter of Hopkins, isn't a very good actress, although she's cute in a generic 1940's blonde way. The guys are the usual dull doorstops found in most Davis movies. I've always assumed that was intentional, to keep Davis in the forefront at all times. All that being said, I still found the movie entertaining, although I was never certain it was for the reasons it was meant to be.    (7/10)

Source: Warner DVD. There are a couple of shorts as bonus features, including "Stars On Horseback".

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**addendum addendum re SNOW WHITE AND THE...(1937)

you just know that immediately after Snow is like "oh, a wishing apple!" The Queen thinks "man she bought right into it. I wasted all that Mummy Dust on my disguise, Hell, I could've worn a pair of Groucho Glasses and this Idiot wouldn't know me."

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Caught the brand-new family film Paddington 2 (2017/2018) last night. The first one a few years back had been a delightful surprise, a family film with acres of visual inventiveness and considerable wit and charm, kind of like a Wes Anderson film meant for children. This sequel delivers on the promise on the first one and delivers again with the same amount of glee that the first one offered and maybe even more so. The whole cast is clearly having a whale of a time here, especially Brendan Gleeson as a prison cook with a carefully hidden softer side and Hugh Grant,  sending up his own matinee idol image as the film's villain. That in addition to returnees from the original Hugh Bonneville, Sally Hawkins, and Julie Walters, all as good as ever, plus cameo appearances from Jim Broadbent, Noah Taylor, Peter Capaldi, Tom Conti, Eileen Atkins, and Joanna Lumley. In short, its one of the best family offerings in a long time, one that will please audiences of all ages.

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1 hour ago, LawrenceA said:

Old Acquaintance (1943) - Melodrama from Warner Brothers and director Vincent Sherman. Kit Marlowe (Bette Davis) and Millie Drake (Miriam Hopkins) have been friends since childhood. They reconnect after many years, as Kit has become a successful author, while Millie is getting married to Preston Drake (John Loder). The two women's friendship shows some strain, though, as the years have changed them both a bit, a situation that is only exacerbated as the years go on. Also featuring Gig Young, Dolores Moran, Phillip Reed, Roscoe Karns, Anne Revere, Esther Dale, Ann Doran, and Philip Van Zandt.

I wasn't quite sure how to take this movie. Was it a serious drama, or a hysterical camp fest? Can it be both? Davis isn't bad, although she displays a lot of the mannered speaking and body language that would make her a favorite of celebrity impressionists. Hopkins is a completely over-the-top ham, and I'm not sure how much was intended by the script/director/producer. Her character is supposed to be an overwrought, neurotic mess, but Hopkins takes it to cartoon levels, and when Davis finally shakes some sense into her, it's a comical scene, to me anyway. Dolores Moran, playing the grown daughter of Hopkins, isn't a very good actress, although she's cute in a generic 1940's blonde way. The guys are the usual dull doorstops found in most Davis movies. I've always assumed that was intentional, to keep Davis in the forefront at all times. All that being said, I still found the movie entertaining, although I was never certain it was for the reasons it was meant to be.    (7/10)

Source: Warner DVD. There are a couple of shorts as bonus features, including "Stars On Horseback".

Davis+and+Hopkins.jpg

That friendships can be enduring in spite of the bumpy ride? Superficially so perhaps. I would think that if a celebrity impressionist were to do Bette this might be the least considered. Bette is so breathtakingly level-headed she's almost boring (for an impressionist perhaps, they might look for a campier Bette which is in ample supply). But she is anything but boring for me, I thought she was terrific. If Hopkins could only have take a bit off the edges, and given us instead a reasonable portrait of such a woman instead of, as you point out, a caricature, the film would have been considerably better. Her hypermania almost ruins the movie.

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4 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

**addendum addendum re SNOW WHITE AND THE...(1937)

you just know that immediately after Snow is like "oh, a wishing apple!" The Queen thinks "man she bought right into it. I wasted all that Mummy Dust on my disguise, Hell, I could've worn a pair of Groucho Glasses and this Idiot wouldn't know me."

Lol.  I agree with you about the artistry of 'Snow White.'  Those early days of Disney animation had some of the most gorgeous animation.  (This gives me an idea for a new thread).  I especially love the backgrounds of Sleeping Beauty--that is a gorgeous film.  I've seen 'Snow White' multiple times.  It's not like I hate the movie, but given the choice between watching that or another film, I'd probably pick something else.  I have most of the Disney movies on DVD/Blu Ray now, I'd probably purchase 'Snow White' just so I'd have all of them.

But going back to your previous post about this film... Yes! Snow White is such an idiot.  Add in her annoying squeaky dippy voice and she just grates on my nerves.  She's definitely a 180 from my girl Belle in Beauty and the Beast.  Even Cinderella seemed to have a little more spunk than Snow White.  And I agree with you 100% about the Evil Queen.  I loved her.  She was the best character in the film.  I wish they'd killed off Snow White in the beginning and just had an entire film about the Evil Queen--she was so glamorous too! She and Maleficent were fierce!    

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Hell Is Sold Out (1951), directed by Michael Anderson (his third film), with Herbert Lom, Mai Zetterling, Richard Attenborough, Hermione Baddeley, and Kathleen Byron. A novelist (Lom) thought dead returns to Paris after World War II to find his name on a novel he didn't write. He arrives home to find a wife (Zetterling) waiting for him. He's never met her before. His friend Pierre (Attenborough, who is endearing and excellent in the role) falls in love with the "wife." There is much identity and emotional confusion, and a fair amount of talk about the importance of propriety if you want to sell books and do a book tour of America. 

This is actually an enjoyable film. Not a great one, but the performances are fine, the film looks good, and the story is engaging. The English actors playing the French with RP English accents seem odd, but I guess if you think of our own Irma la Douce, maybe not so odd, except that there is the occasional Frenchman who actually sounds French; and there are four dotty American ladies who definitely sound American. Herbert Lom looks very much like Charles Boyer.

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"The Scarlet Letter" (1926)

Movie plot progress too fast, either something is missing such as the adultery or that was one impatient stork.:blink:

Poor child she gave birth to, as if it's her FAULT! Bunch of high and mighty Puritan (pure my Aunt Fanny) stuck ups.:angry:

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The 1934 version is on Youtube. It has the wrong year listed. 

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Just converted and download the 1934 version of "The Scarlet Letter".  Don't have time to watch it now, will copy to DVD later. 

Stars Colleen Moore and Alan Hale.

1200px-Scarlet_Letter_lobby_card.jpg

 

 

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The Phantom (1943) - 15-chapter jungle adventure serial based on the popular comic strip, from Columbia Pictures and director B. Reeves Eason. Tom Tyler stars as Godfrey Prescott, who discovers at the film's start that he has inherited the mantle of the Phantom, "The Ghost Who Walks", a reputedly immortal jungle protector dwelling in a forbidden, skull-shaped cave in Africa. The natives ascribe all sorts of mystical powers to the Phantom, but he's in fact just a mortal man, well trained in the fighting arts, who cultivates an air of mystery so as to terrify potential adversaries. His immortal reputation comes from the Phantom costume and title being passed from lookalike father to son for hundreds of years, leading the natives to believe that it has been the same being for centuries. Soon after becoming the Phantom, Godfrey has to battle a sinister group of criminals led by Dr. Bremmer (Kenneth MacDonald) who are after the location of a legendary hidden city that is said to hold unimaginable treasure. Also featuring Jeanne Bates, Frank Shannon, Ernie Adams, Robert Barron, Anthony Caruso, George Chesebro, I. Stanford Jolley, Kermit Maynard, Anthony Warde, Jay Silverheels, Iron Eyes Cody, Ray Corrigan as Brutus the Gorilla, and Ace the Wonder Dog as Devil.

The Phantom is an important figure in the history of the superhero. He was the first one to wear the stereotypical tights costume one associates with the genre. He's basically a combination of the Shadow and Tarzan, but he's proven very popular around the world, with the comic strip still being run in newspapers over 80 years after its debut. So it's no surprise that he'd be the inspiration for a serial during this period. Tom Tyler, who had starred in The Adventures of Captain Marvel in 1941, gets to star again as the hero, and while his dialogue delivery is clunky, he throws great punches, made more amusing since his skull-shaped signet ring leaves skull impressions in his enemies' faces. Most of this plays like the standard jungle adventure movie, with stock jungle footage, and lots of animal battles.The Phantom fights a lion, a tiger, an alligator, and a guy in a gorilla costume. There are also a lot of superstitious natives, although they are a point of confusion. I wasn't sure for awhile where this was supposed to be set. I know it's a fictional land, but it's supposed to be in Africa. However, all of the natives look white or Native American, and they dress in a silly mix of Polynesian and African tribal looks. It just adds to the B movie charm, and this is one of the more enjoyable serials.    (7/10)

Source: VCI DVD, on two discs. Chapter 11 had degraded so much that the sound was completely lost. The DVD producers opted to dub the dialogue, adding some unintended humor.

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Paris Model (1953)

A quartet of light hearted stories (each about 20 minutes) linked by the same Parisian gown that makes the rounds for four different ladies hoping this low cut, upper body enhancement will help them hook a man. The film is done on the cheap with, at times, threadbare sets, and is most noteworthy for its primarily veteran cast in need of work.

Eva Gabor comes off reasonably well in the opening episode, trying her best to catch turban wearing Maharajah Tom Conway (!?!), the latter looking even more bored than usual. Gabor charges the dress to one of her (unsuspecting) admirers, but gets short changed herself when Conway sets his eyes on a ravishing Laurette Luez in a casino.

Next on the hit list is Paulette Goddard as the secretary of a lawyer (Leif Erickson), hoping to lure him away from his shrewish wife by getting him to take her to dinner while she wears that dress. A decidedly lightweight episode, Goddard is game but looking past her feisty, vivacious prime, though still able to show off a pair of attractive legs as bait for the lawyer.

The third episode involves Marilyn Maxwell as the wife of a salesman hoping to use the attraction of that dress on her husband's retiring boss (Cecil Kellaway), so that he will appoint hubby as his replacement. Maxwell, by the way, receives top billing in this film, a sad comment on the decline of Goddard's career, since she was once a far bigger Hollywood star than Maxwell could ever possibly be. A frail looking Florence Bates appears as Kellaway's wife in what turned out to be her last film role.

The final story features, as opposed to the veterans, up-and-coming Barbara Lawrence as a young woman seeking to use that dress to get her non committing boyfriend (Robert Hutton) to finally pop the big question to her. This episode is primarily set in Romanoff's Restaurant in LA, with curtains and paper mache "walls" serving as a set, as well as a grim reminder of just how cheap the budget of this film must have been. Of note, though, Prince Michael Romanoff makes an appearance himself here, playing the role of matchmaker. El Brendel briefly turns up, too, as Lawrence's father.

A minor time waster, it's always a little sad to see film veterans forced to collect their paychecks with such meager material. Paris Model (the title referring to the dress, not a person) gets the occasional broadcast on TCM.

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2 out of 4

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59 minutes ago, TomJH said:

Paris Model (1953)

 

The final story features, as opposed to the veterans, up-and-coming Barbara Lawrence as a young woman seeking to use that dress to get her non committing boyfriend (Robert Hutton) to finally pop the big question to her. This episode is primarily set in Romanoff's Restaurant in LA, with curtains and paper mache "walls" serving as a set, as well as a grim reminder of just how cheap the budget of this film must have been. Of note, though, Prince Michael Romanoff makes an appearance himself here, playing the role of matchmaker. El Brendel briefly turns up, too, as Lawrence's father.

Ever since I saw Barbara Lawrence in Kronos, I've had the hots for her. On the other hand, every time I see Robert Hutton, I wonder how he ever had a career.

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3 hours ago, scsu1975 said:

Ever since I saw Barbara Lawrence in Kronos, I've had the hots for her. On the other hand, every time I see Robert Hutton, I wonder how he ever had a career.

The transformation of Robert Hutton's screen image is what surprises me. If you see him in his earliest films, such as Hollywood Canteen, as the soldier who gets to date Joan Leslie, or in Destination Toyko, he's "the kid," a gosh shucks modest Middle America type who reminds me of a young Jimmy Stewart. Any woman past 40 will want to mother and protect him.

A few shorts years later, though, he was anything but, playing brash, aggressive types (often sporting a moustache giving him a used car salesman sleaziness) and anything but likeable. He's that way in Paris Model, to a degree, but even more so in Man on the Eiffel Tower, made just five years after Hollywood Canteen.

I watched him in a couple of episodes of TV's The Saint recently in which he was cast as opportunists (still had that moustache). But his acting career lasted until the mid '70s so he must have had something that film and TV producers wanted.

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Hutton in Hollywood Canteen: Middle America wholesomeness personified

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Later Hutton, with moustache. Anyone wanna buy a used car off this man?

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Pilot #5 (1943) - War drama from MGM and director George Sidney. On an Allied air base in Java, airman George Collins (Franchot Tone) is chosen to pilot their one remaining fighter plane to bomb a Japanese aircraft carrier off the coast. As he's flying to his target, the new base commanding officer Major Eichel (Steven Geray) questions the other four remaining pilots about George's past, which is shown in flashback. Also starring Marsha Hunt, Gene Kelly, Van Johnson, Alan Baxter, Dick Simmons, Howard Freeman, Frank Puglia, William Tannen, Eddie Acuff, Monte Blue, Hobart Cavanaugh, Jim Davis, Kay Medford, Marie Windsor, and Peter Lawford.

I expected another standard military recruitment/propaganda flag-waver, but instead this is largely a melodrama about guilt and redemption through service and sacrifice. Tone plays the main character, but he's never really made clear, due to most of the film being told through other's eyes. Gene Kelly, appearing in his first drama role, is decent as Tone's proudly Italian law practice partner.    (6/10)

Source: TCM.

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1 hour ago, scsu1975 said:

Ever since I saw Barbara Lawrence in Kronos, I've had the hots for her. On the other hand, every time I see Robert Hutton, I wonder how he ever had a career.

FYI, KRONOS is in full on u yay ube tay. It's pretty funny. 

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1 hour ago, TomJH said:

The transformation of Robert Hutton's screen image is what surprises me. If you see him in his earliest films, such as Hollywood Canteen, as the soldier who gets to date Joan Leslie, or in Destination Toyko, he's "the kid," a gosh shucks modest Middle America type who reminds me of a young Jimmy Stewart. Any woman past 40 will want to mother and protect him.

A few shorts years later, though, he was anything but, playing brash, aggressive types (often sporting a moustache giving him a used car salesman sleaziness) and anything but likeable. He's that way in Model Wife, to a degree, but even more so in Man on the Eiffel Tower, made just five years after Hollywood Canteen.

The only Model Wife film I could find was released in 1941,  which would be 3 years before Hollywood Canteen, and featured the married couple Powell and Blondell.    (in fact under Blondell if one clicks 'model wife' they get some web based series).

Note that in The Racket he plays a Jimmy Stewart character with Liz Scott being the women who finally decides to mother and protect him.  (and while Scott was two years younger than Hutton,  her character looked older since,  unlike Hutton's press reporter,   she had been around the block).

 

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13 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

The only Model Wife film I could find was released in 1941,  which would be 3 years before Hollywood Canteen, and featured the married couple Powell and Blondell.   

Tom mistyped, I think. He meant Paris Model, the film featuring Hutton that he reviewed about 6 posts before yours.

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Reveille with Beverly (1943) - Flag-waving musical review from Columbia Pictures and director Charles Barton. The flimsy plot concerns Beverly Ross (Ann Miller), a young woman who DJ's an early morning radio show featuring contemporary tunes. She becomes a favorite of the men at the nearby army base, and two of them (William Wright and Dick Purcell) pursue her. Also featuring Larry Parks, Tim Ryan, Barbara Brown, Douglas Levitt, Adele Mara, Walter Sande, Wally Vernon, Andrew Tombes, Doodles Weaver, and Irene Ryan. With musical performances by Frank Sinatra, Duke Ellington and His Orchestra, the Count Basie Orchestra, Bob Crosby and His Orchestra, Freddie Slack and His Orchestra, Ella Mae Morse, and the Mills Brothers.

Based on the "story" and the dialogue, this movie would be a near complete waste. However, the musical performances are top notch, a nice selection of some of the better acts of the day doing some great songs. Sinatra sings "Night and Day", and the Duke Ellington Orchestra does "Take the A Train". A comedy trio named the Radio Rogues does a celebrity impression bit, but I only recognized a little over half of who they were trying, and even those were a bit dodgy. Ann Miller does a terrific tap dancing number to close out the film.   (7/10)

Source: TCM.

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Sherlock Holmes in Washington (1943) - Spy thriller from Universal Pictures and director Roy William Neill. Holmes (Basil Rathbone) and Watson (Nigel Bruce) travel to the US capitol in search of missing microfilm, which makes them a target for a Nazi spy ring. Also featuring Marjorie Lord, John Archer, George Zucco, Henry Daniell, Gavin Muir, Edmund MacDonald, Don Terry, Bradley Page, Holmes Herbert, Gerald Hamer, Clarence Muse, Ian Wolfe, and Thurston Hall.

The first half of this short Holmes entry was a bit of a bore, but the exciting final act, taking place in the villains' antique shop hideout, makes this one worthwhile. I enjoyed seeing Zucco and Daniell together, both of whom played Moriarty in other Rathbone/Holmes outings.   (7/10)

Source: MPI DVD.

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I love 1930s and 1940s films, music, and stars. I'm almost always spending my time off watching a film from that era, or even watching YouTube clips or music from that era on YouTube.

I will tell you something I find sort of annoying and I'm wondering if anyone else here agrees with this. Sometimes, there are YouTube clips showing pictures or film scenes from the 1930s with for some reason, modern music on the soundtrack. I recently watched one with Gloria Stewart clips with some modern techno song playing, and I just watched a scene of Ginger Rogers photos with some modern rap song playing. I'm thinking what the he'll were the people who put the YouTube clip together thinking!? Those modern songs do not match with and ruin the feel of the 1930s world being shown, and takes away the classic old fashioned feel that those scenes usually provide. Why are they playing modern techno and rap to old classic vintage clips of the lovely Ginger Rogers, Thelma Todd, and Gloria Stewart? There are

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