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I Just Watched...

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14 minutes ago, Allenex said:

I love 1930s and 1940s films, music, and stars. I'm almost always spending my time off watching a film from that era, or even watching YouTube clips or music from that era on YouTube.

I will tell you something I find sort of annoying and I'm wondering if anyone else here agrees with this. Sometimes, there are YouTube clips showing pictures or film scenes from the 1930s with for some reason, modern music on the soundtrack. I recently watched one with Gloria Stewart clips with some modern techno song playing, and I just watched a scene of Ginger Rogers photos with some modern rap song playing. I'm thinking what the he'll were the people who put the YouTube clip together thinking!? Those modern songs do not match with and ruin the feel of the 1930s world being shown, and takes away the classic old fashioned feel that those scenes usually provide. Why are they playing modern techno and rap to old classic vintage clips of the lovely Ginger Rogers, Thelma Todd, and Gloria Stewart? There are

Where these clips 'promoting' those actors (and their films),  or the music?

Note that there could also be legal issues involved.    E.g. something that prohibits one from showing the clip era appropriate music.

Of course it could just be that this is what those that created it like.   

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10 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Where these clips 'promoting' those actors (and their films),  or the music?

Note that there could also be legal issues involved.    E.g. something that prohibits one from showing the clip era appropriate music.

Of course it could just be that this is what those that created it like.   

I didn't think there were legal issues because there are plenty of 1930s YouTube clips which have 1930s music that's played along with them.  I understand how I'm sure there are people who like both 1930s films and modern music, which might be why they're choosing to mix the two together with those particular clips. I just didn't think that many people would find they match together, cause I sure don't find that they do. Well, different strokes for different folks.

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Sherlock Holmes Faces Death (1943) - Murder mystery from Universal Pictures and director Roy William Neill. Holmes (Basil Rathbone) and Watson (Nigel Bruce) investigate a series of murders at a large, foreboding manor estate that's being used as a rest home for shell shocked soldiers. Also featuring Dennis Hoey, Arthur Margetson, Hillary Brooke, Halliwell Hobbes, Minna Phillips, Milburn Stone, Gavin Muir, Gerald Hamer, Vernon Downing, Olaf Hytten, Frederick Worlock, and Peter Lawford.

Based on one of Arthur Conan Doyle's stories, this entry in the series feels more like a traditional mystery than the other modern-era Holmes movies. Rathbone looks more severe, a bit older and thinner, than in the previous film, and Bruce is a bit more bumbling. The cast of characters is populated by a lot of nondescript performers who make it difficult to follow along at times, as I couldn't recall who was who. Still, this is entertaining, and there's some atmospheric cinematography in the old dark house tradition.   (7/10)

Source: MPI DVD.

shfd98.jpg

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On April 10, 2018 at 7:48 PM, Bethluvsfilms said:

Scumbag that he may be, as far as his acting abilities go, I wouldn't sell Spacey short. He is(was) capable of turning in many fine performances and I think he probably could have done the role justice as well, but we will never know. 

I saw Kevin Spacey in David Mamet's play Speed the Plow at the Old Vic with Jeff Goldblum a few years back.  I was pleasantly surprised by how riveting he is on the stage.  Much more so than any film.  And the play wasn't even that good.

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The Spider Woman (1943) - Another murder mystery from Universal Pictures and director Roy William Neill. Holmes (Basil Rathbone) and Watson (Nigel Bruce) look into a series of mysterious deaths labeled the "pyjama suicides", which may be connected to a mysterious woman named Adrea Spedding (Gale Sondergaard). Also featuring Dennis Hoey, Vernon Downing, Alec Craig, Arthur Hohl, Mary Gordon, Gene Roth, and Angeloa Rossitto.

This entry in the series combines elements from several of the Doyle stories, with a lot of original material as well. Rathbone gets to play a disguised scene again, which he seems to enjoy. Sondergaard is one of the best screen villainesses of all time, so she's always a welcome sight. Despite the diminished critical regard for this series in recent years, I'm finding that I've enjoyed the majority of them. Perhaps not regarding the original Doyle stories as sacred is part of it.   (7/10)

Source: MPI DVD.

the-spider-woman-poster.jpg

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17 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Sherlock Holmes Faces Death (1943)

 

shfd98.jpg

Hillary Brooke played your standard lady in distress in this entry. Her next appearance in the Holmes series (The Woman in Green) would be a far different kind of role, and a far more memorable appearance.

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1 hour ago, LawrenceA said:

The Spider Woman (1943)

Did she kiss anybody?

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Stormy Weather (1943) - Entertaining musical from 20th Century Fox and director Andrew Stone. Former soldier Bill (Bill Robinson) has just returned home after WW1 and has his sights set on becoming a dancer. He falls for aspiring singer Selina (Lena Horne), and the path the two take keeps intersecting. Also featuring Cab Calloway, Fats Waller, Ada Brown, Dooley Wilson, and the Nicholas Brothers.

This is another threadbare plot that simply serves to set up some tremendous song and dance numbers by many of the best black artists of the day. The embarrassment of musical riches is too many to list, but I didn't think there was a snoozer in the bunch. The lengthy closing musical section is terrific, with the Nicholas Brothers' acrobatic dance moves a highlight.    (7/10)

Source: TCM.

stormy-weather-1943-poster-1-fx10d25g10w

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Johnny Allegro (1949)

Of the countless tough guy melodramas that featured George Raft in the late '40s and early '50s, this slick Columbia production ranks a notch or two above most. Raft plays a gangster escaped from prison who is recruited by the Treasury Department to help them land a gang of counterfeiters.

It's not so much the plot that demands attention here as it is Columbia's effort to superficially remind its audience of one of its biggest hits of a few years before, Gilda. This is to the extent of casting George Macready as the cultured head of the counterfeiters. (You know he's cultured because he listens to classical music). He also prefers the use of a bow and arrow (a man's weapon) over that of a gun. Ballin in Gilda is now called Vallin.

His wife, whom Allegro desires, of course, is played by a sophisticated Nina Foch. Her character's name? Glenda. Not quite Gilda, but close enough. And then, of course, there are the leading men in the two films, both named Johnny.

With that bow and arrow fetish of Macready the audiences knows, too, that it probably won't be long before another variation of The Most Dangerous Game gets played out. Macready is fun to watch, even if there is a feeling of having seen much of this same act before. Raft is Raft. Did ever a block of wood dress better? And Nina Foch, well, she'll never replace the memory of Hayworth's declasse vamp.

A serviceable time waster.

image42.jpg

2.5 out of 4

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Tender Comrade (1943) - Homefront war drama from RKO and director Edward Dmytryk. A group of four women, Jo (Ginger Rogers), Barbara (Ruth Hussey), Helen (Patricia Collinge), and Doris (Kim Hunter), share a house to save money while their husbands are all off fighting the war. They deal with the various ups and downs of being a homefront wife, while flashbacks show the romance between Jo and her husband Chris (Robert Ryan). Also featuring Mady Christians, Jane Darwell, Richard Martin, Mary Forbes, and Richard Gaines.

After my initial disappointment passed (I had assumed by the title that this was about Russian cannibals), I enjoyed this somewhat, although the sentimentality got to be too much now and then. Rogers' performance is uneven. She's moving in some scenes, clumsy and amateurish in others. It's odd seeing Hunter, who I know from much later stuff, as the bubbly young girl. Ryan gets to play a rare romantic lead, and he's only somewhat successful. This was written by Dalton Trumbo, and this movie was later trotted out by HUAC as an example of his subversive communist content.    (6/10)

Source: TCM.

 d9a5bc014a87021d3141bd40634efd84.jpg

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On ‎4‎/‎29‎/‎2018 at 11:46 AM, Bethluvsfilms said:

Good as Heath was, my favorite Joker will always be Jack. And yes, for queen of screams in the original BATMAN franchise of the 80's and 90's, nobody beats Kim.

For once somebody else agrees with me on *Nicholson as "The Joker"

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1 hour ago, LawrenceA said:

Tender Comrade (1943) - Homefront war drama from RKO and director Edward Dmytryk. A group of four women, Jo (Ginger Rogers), Barbara (Ruth Hussey), Helen (Patricia Collinge), and Doris (Kim Hunter), share a house to save money while their husbands are all off fighting the war. They deal with the various ups and downs of being a homefront wife, while flashbacks show the romance between Jo and her husband Chris (Robert Ryan). Also featuring Mady Christians, Jane Darwell, Richard Martin, Mary Forbes, and Richard Gaines.

After my initial disappointment passed (I had assumed by the title that this was about Russian cannibals), I enjoyed this somewhat, although the sentimentality got to be too much now and then. Rogers' performance is uneven. She's moving in some scenes, clumsy and amateurish in others. It's odd seeing Hunter, who I know from much later stuff, as the bubbly young girl. Ryan gets to play a rare romantic lead, and he's only somewhat successful. This was written by Dalton Trumbo, and this movie was later trotted out by HUAC as an example of his subversive communist content.    (6/10)

Source: TCM.

 d9a5bc014a87021d3141bd40634efd84.jpg

A nice movie (***) but was called a commie film due to to HUAC witch hunt  Necause the ladies' all shared an apt together?

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On ‎4‎/‎30‎/‎2018 at 6:49 PM, jamesjazzguitar said:

Where these clips 'promoting' those actors (and their films),  or the music?

Note that there could also be legal issues involved.    E.g. something that prohibits one from showing the clip era appropriate music.

Of course it could just be that this is what those that created it like.   

Didn't see the clips yet though

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2 hours ago, TomJH said:

Johnny Allegro (1949)

Of the countless tough guy melodramas that featured George Raft in the late '40s and early '50s, this slick Columbia production ranks a notch or two above most. Raft plays a gangster escaped from prison who is recruited by the Treasury Department to help them land a gang of counterfeiters.

It's not so much the plot that demands attention here as it is Columbia's effort to superficially remind its audience of one of its biggest hits of a few years before, Gilda. This is to the extent of casting George Macready as the cultured head of the counterfeiters. (You know he's cultured because he listens to classical music). He also prefers the use of a bow and arrow (a man's weapon) over that of a gun. Ballin in Gilda is now called Vallin.

His wife, whom Allegro desires, of course, is played by a sophisticated Nina Foch. Her character's name? Glenda. Not quite Gilda, but close enough. And then, of course, there are the leading men in the two films, both named Johnny.

With that bow and arrow fetish of Macready the audiences knows, too, that it probably won't be long before another variation of The Most Dangerous Game gets played out. Macready is fun to watch, even if there is a feeling of having seen much of this same act before. Raft is Raft. Did ever a block of wood dress better? And Nina Foch, well, she'll never replace the memory of Hayworth's declasse vamp.

A serviceable time waster.

image42.jpg

2.5 out of 4

Although George Raft (l895-l980) was a one note actor, he still should at least be a TCM "STOTM" one time.  Like Ronald Reagan-(1911-2004) he made about 50 flix too.

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I wrote about this yrs ago on here, but still nothing ever happened as far as programming  Maybe because of Reagan later become the president & Raft & his crime buddy Benjamin "Bugsy" Siegel (l906-l947) he was the sole person at his funeral at "Hollywood Forever, park"

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7 hours ago, spence said:

Although George Raft (l895-l980) was a one note actor, he still should at least be a TCM "STOTM" one time.  Like Ronald Reagan-(1911-2004) he made about 50 flix too.

I agree. Raft had screen presence, was one of the most dapper of film stars and we know from his personal life that the tough guy screen image was not just a film facade (ironically the actor fought against playing gangsters, per se).

In Johnny Allegro he plays a hood on the lam trying to start a new life as - ready for this - a florist.

But Raft also has more than his fair share of critics on these boards.

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10 hours ago, TomJH said:

Johnny Allegro (1949)

Of the countless tough guy melodramas that featured George Raft in the late '40s and early '50s, this slick Columbia production ranks a notch or two above most. Raft plays a gangster escaped from prison who is recruited by the Treasury Department to help them land a gang of counterfeiters.

It's not so much the plot that demands attention here as it is Columbia's effort to superficially remind its audience of one of its biggest hits of a few years before, Gilda. This is to the extent of casting George Macready as the cultured head of the counterfeiters. (You know he's cultured because he listens to classical music). He also prefers the use of a bow and arrow (a man's weapon) over that of a gun. Ballin in Gilda is now called Vallin.

His wife, whom Allegro desires, of course, is played by a sophisticated Nina Foch. Her character's name? Glenda. Not quite Gilda, but close enough. And then, of course, there are the leading men in the two films, both named Johnny.

With that bow and arrow fetish of Macready the audiences knows, too, that it probably won't be long before another variation of The Most Dangerous Game gets played out. Macready is fun to watch, even if there is a feeling of having seen much of this same act before. Raft is Raft. Did ever a block of wood dress better? And Nina Foch, well, she'll never replace the memory of Hayworth's declasse vamp.

A serviceable time waster.

image42.jpg

2.5 out of 4

I've never been impressed with anything I've seen Nina Foch in she just doesn't stay in my mind as memorable, Raft is OK but not really that great, I like him best in ScarfaceThey Drive by NightRed Light, and Some Like It Hot, with the two in the middle my favorites. Of course I haven't seen all his films, and there may be a few others I'd warm to.

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1 hour ago, cigarjoe said:

I've never been impressed with anything I've seen Nina Foch in she just doesn't stay in my mind as memorable, Raft is OK but not really that great, I like him best in ScarfaceThey Drive by NightRed Light, and Some Like It Hot, with the two in the middle my favorites. Of course I haven't seen all his films, and there may be a few others I'd warm to.

I don't know if I've seen Red Light but I agree that Raft is strong in the other three films (actually, he's wonderful casting in the Billy Wilder film; it's a shame they couldn't get Eddie Robinson to agree to oppose him as Little Napoleon. Having said that Nehemiah Persoff is still pretty good).

Raft's last line in Some Like It Hot, after he gets tommy gunned by the guy popping out of the birthday cake: "Some joke." Since the actor who killed him was played by Edward G. Robinson Jr. (seen earlier in the film flipping a coin like Raft) and everyone within the Hollywood community knew that Raft and Robinson Sr. didn't get along, I sometimes view his final line as a bit of an inside joke due to the casting.

I agree with you about Nina Foch. She's a bit of a nothing as far as lasting screen impressions are concerned with me. It almost seems unfair to compare her to Rita Hayworth, as I did in my review. Foch is sexless, no matter how well attired, while Hayworth was in a class of her own when it came to screen sensuality.

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This Land Is Mine (1943) - More wartime occupation drama, from RKO and director Jean Renoir. In an unnamed European town (it's a symbolic stand-in for France, but the characters are all British), the German army moves in and sets up occupation. Local school teacher Albert (Charles Laughton) is more concerned with his romantic feelings for co-worker Louise (Maureen O'Hara) and escaping from the clutches of his over-protective mother (Una O'Connor). However, when a resistance movement begins against the Nazis, Albert may find himself drawn into it. Also featuring George Sanders, Walter Slezak, Kent Smith, Philip Merivale, Thurston Hall, George Coulouris, Nancy Gates, John Banner, and John Donat.

Director Renoir manages to inject some originality into well-trod territory. Laughton is very good as the weak-willed Albert, and he's ably matched by the string and beautiful O'Hara. George Sanders seems a bit wasted in his role as a collaborator, but he gets one really good scene. The biggest surprise was Kent Smith, an actor who I usually regard as a waste of space. Here, playing a daring resistance fighter operating right under the Germans' noses, he's charismatic and exciting. The movie won an Oscar for Best Sound.   (7/10)

One last bit of comparative trivia: This Land Is Mine was a big hit, with a record-breaking opening weekend. This was because it opened on a then-unheard-of 72 screens. Compare that with this past weekend's Avengers: Infinity War, which opened on 4,474 screens in the U.S. alone. 

Source: TCM.

1000549345-size-exact-300x0.jpg

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5 hours ago, TomJH said:

I agree. Raft had screen presence, was one of the most dapper of film stars and we know from his personal life that the tough guy screen image was not just a film facade (ironically the actor fought against playing gangsters, per se).

In Johnny Allegro he plays a hood on the lam trying to start a new life as - ready for this - a florist.

But Raft also has more than his fair share of critics on these boards.

Yep, even as fellow true life tough guy & also from Hell's Kitchen *Cagney wrote in his autobio that Raft was the actual toughest of them all

 

He even flattened Edward G, during 1941's good "Manpower" (***-out of 4 stars)

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1 minute ago, spence said:

Yep, even as fellow true life tough guy & also from Hell's Kitchen *Cagney wrote in his autobio that Raft was the actual toughest of them all

 

He even flattened Edward G, during 1941's good "Manpower" (***-out of 4 stars)

So Raft was made out of mahogany instead of pine.    

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& like many during Hollywoods Golden age/studio System Era-(1925-1960) Raft also heighted & wore lifts, along w/Edward G, 5'5, *Bogart, 5'8,  B. Donlevy, *Yul Brynner, Tyrone Power & of course the tragic Alan Ladd of whom was said to be 5'6 on his best day!

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1 hour ago, LawrenceA said:

This Land Is Mine (1943) - More wartime occupation drama, from RKO and director Jean Renoir. In an unnamed European town (it's a symbolic stand-in for France, but the characters are all British), the German army moves in and sets up occupation. Local school teacher Albert (Charles Laughton) is more concerned with his romantic feelings for co-worker Louise (Maureen O'Hara) and escaping from the clutches of his over-protective mother (Una O'Connor). However, when a resistance movement begins against the Nazis, Albert may find himself drawn into it. Also featuring George Sanders, Walter Slezak, Kent Smith, Philip Merivale, Thurston Hall, George Coulouris, Nancy Gates, John Banner, and John Donat.

Director Renoir manages to inject some originality into well-trod territory. Laughton is very good as the weak-willed Albert, and he's ably matched by the string and beautiful O'Hara. George Sanders seems a bit wasted in his role as a collaborator, but he gets one really good scene. The biggest surprise was Kent Smith, an actor who I usually regard as a waste of space. Here, playing a daring resistance fighter operating right under the Germans' noses, he's charismatic and exciting. The movie won an Oscar for Best Sound.   (7/10)

One last bit of comparative trivia: This Land Is Mine was a big hit, with a record-breaking opening weekend. This was because it opened on a then-unheard-of 72 screens. Compare that with this past weekend's Avengers: Infinity War, which opened on 4,474 screens in the U.S. alone. 

Source: TCM.

1000549345-size-exact-300x0.jpg

It won the Best sound *0scar, but not a fan of this (**1/2) for 2 reasons, *Laughton-(superb actor, but I never cared for him my self) & it's a bit dated nowadays

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4 hours ago, TomJH said:

I don't know if I've seen Red Light but I agree that Raft is strong in the other three films (actually, he's wonderful casting in the Billy Wilder film; it's a shame they couldn't get Eddie Robinson to agree to oppose him as Little Napoleon. Having said that Nehemiah Persoff is still pretty good).

Raft's last line in Some Like It Hot, after he gets tommy gunned by the guy popping out of the birthday cake: "Some joke." Since the actor who killed him was played by Edward G. Robinson Jr. (seen earlier in the film flipping a coin like Raft) and everyone within the Hollywood community knew that Raft and Robinson Sr. didn't get along, I sometimes view his final line as a bit of an inside joke due to the casting.

I agree with you about Nina Foch. She's a bit of a nothing as far as lasting screen impressions are concerned with me. It almost seems unfair to compare her to Rita Hayworth, as I did in my review. Foch is sexless, no matter how well attired, while Hayworth was in a class of her own when it came to screen sensuality.

& Eddie G., Jr. died young of something & is also interred at that "Hollywood, Forever, park"-(the 1 that borders Paramount & the old RKO Radio)

& was ok in the famed classic from Hawks & Hughes 1932's "Scarface: Shame of a Nation" (UA)-(SEE MY BELOW POST ABOUT RAFT & EDWARD G., SR. THE TWO DETESTED EACH OTHER!)

 

Never yet saw "red Light" though

 

& as you & others probably recall his supporting turn in 1960's "Ocean's Eleven" (***-out of four)

Plus, 1961's often hilarious Jerry Lewis comedy "The Ladies' Man" (***1/2)

 

But, when it came to acting he was no Eddie G!

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13 hours ago, spence said:

Although George Raft (l895-l980) was a one note actor, he still should at least be a TCM "STOTM" one time.  Like Ronald Reagan-(1911-2004) he made about 50 flix too.

I think Foch was up for a supporting *Oscar for 1954's "Executive Suite"

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