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I Just Watched...

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Youth Runs Wild (1944) - Weak juvenile delinquency drama from RKO and director Mark Robson. Married couple Mary (Jean Brooks) and Danny Coates (Kent Smith) try to mentor troubled youth on the WW2 homefront. Young couple Frankie (Glen Vernon) and Sarah (Vanessa Brown) are running with disreputable types like Toddy (Bonita Granville) and Larry (Lawrence Tierney), which can only lead to trouble. Also featuring Ben Bard, Mary Servoss, Dickie Moore, Fritz Leiber, and Arthur Shields.

What could have been a stirring social drama or an amusing kitschy romp is instead a dull slog hampered by a bad script and uninspired direction. Even reliable players like Granville and Tierney fail to bring any energy to this self-serious waste of time.    (4/10)

Source: TCM. This was one of the worst prints that I've seen from TCM, with fluctuating brightness levels and poor sound quality.

youth-runs-wild-movie-poster-1944-101027

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The Thin Man Goes Home (1944) - Fifth in the series of comedic mysteries from MGM, this time directed by Richard Thorpe. Nick (William Powell) and Nora Charles (Myrna Loy) travel to Nick's small home town to visit his parents and to enjoy some quiet relaxation. When a dead body shows up on their literal doorstep, they have to figure out who the killer is before they become the next victim. Also featuring Harry Davenport, Edward Brophy, Gloria DeHaven, Morris Ankrum, Leon Ames, Lucile Watson, Anne Revere, Helen Vinson, Lloyd Corrigan, Anita Bolster, Donald MacBride, Minor Watson, Joseph Crehan, Edward Gargan, Mike Mazurki, and Donald Meek.

Coming after a several year break due to Loy getting married and devoting her time to charitable work during the war, this is a welcome return to the old series. The pace may be a little slower, and the changing times have had some effect on the storylines (wartime rationing meant little to no imbibing of liquor), but the chemistry between Powell and Loy is intact, and both still have their easy wit and charm. The large supporting cast is also fun, especially Brophy, Davenport, Meek, and Anne Revere as town weirdo Crazy Mary.   (7/10)

Source: TCM. The release date for this one is a contested issue, it seems, Many sources list 1944, others 1945. IMDb has switched it back and forth at least three times in the past year. 

225px-Thinmangoeshomeposter.jpg

 

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10 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Source: TCM. The release date for this one is a contested issue, it seems, Many sources list 1944, others 1945. IMDb has switched it back and forth at least three times in the past year. 

225px-Thinmangoeshomeposter.jpg

 

I wonder if there is an agreed-upon definition of "release date" in the industry. The Thin Man Goes Home played in several states (Maryland, Pennsylvania, and North Carolina) in late December 1944. It debuted in NY in the town of Olean, as a 12:00 A.M. showing on December 31, 1944. Maybe those places weren't considered important enough.

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The_Voice_of_the_Turtle_FilmPoster.jpeg

I just watched oddly titled THE VOICE OF THE TURTLE '47 recorded from TCM last month. It starred the always gorgeous, understated Eleanor Parker who was great despite her sporting Barbara Stanwyck's ugly helmet like wig from DOUBLE INDEMNITY.
Co starring is the wonderful Eve Arden who pretty much played her best charactor-the jaded, smart, saucy retort glamor gal we all love. For once she had lots of screen time for us to enjoy. The "man" was el blando Ronald Reagan, but his calm demeanor & good looks fit the part well.

The movie was a typical love triangle soaper, set in war time of best friends on extreme ends of the spectrum-Parker is a pushover while Arden is street wise considering their relationships with men. What was shocking to me -shocking I say- was the open way pre marital sex was discussed by the two gals. They discussed the problems of "allowing a man to make love to you" which often means wooing foreplay, but as they talked further you realized they were discussing intercourse.
It was pretty progressive for Arden to dismiss her various partners & activity as just "playing around" in a movie of the 40's. It truly showed women's sexual liberation which started with the flappers had progressed to more traditional young girls during war time. (and we all know what happened in the 70's with the pill)

I really liked this movie, although I'm still very puzzled about the title. Maybe I dozed off when it was explained.

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38 minutes ago, TikiSoo said:

The_Voice_of_the_Turtle_FilmPoster.jpeg

 

I really liked this movie, although I'm still very puzzled about the title. Maybe I dozed off when it was explained.

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"All I know is I can beat that dumb rabbit every time."

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"That's not what this movie's about, ya little shrimp!"

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It (1927) - Silent romance from Paramount Pictures and director Clarence Badger. Cyrus (Antonio Moreno) is the heir to a large, successful department store. He falls for counter girl Betty (Clara Bow), a young woman who definitely has "IT", that indefinable quality that makes certain people the center of attention. Cyrus' goofball friend Monty (William Austin) tries to facilitate the "opposite sides of the track" romance between his buddy and Betty, with more than a few hiccups along the way. Also featuring Priscilla Bonner, Jacqueline Gadsdon, Julia Swayne Gordon, and Gary Cooper.

This was based on a story by Elinor Glyn, and if you don't know the name, you sure will by the end of the movie. Her name is featured prominently in the opening credits, then in a title card explaining what "IT" is, then in a copy of the story being read by a character in the movie, and then when Glyn shows up for a cameo, playing herself! Anyway, most people have heard of this movie and the "It Girl" moniker that it gave Clara Bow for the rest of her life, but I'm only now getting around to actually watching the movie. It's not bad, a decent rom-com of the period, with many little period details that make modern viewing interesting. The changes in fashions, manner and speech are amusing. I don't think I'd ever seen the exclamation "Hot Socks!" before. Bow is cute, and pushes the boundary for what a woman could do, say and look like on screen (near the end of the film as she climbs soaking wet out of the water with her clothing clinging to her, leaving little to the imagination, comes to mind). In that way It prefigures the coming Pre-Code early sound era.   (7/10)

Source: TCM.

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Poor Bow, she died fairly young at just 60 in 1905 or so, Turned into a huge drunk too!

 

Silents did her in like sooo many others

 

Always kicked myself on first vacation to "H" & GLENDALE'S, "FOREST LAWN" I was in exact alley, but was more focused on snapping shots  of both Alan Ladd & *Burns & Allen & neglected to see hers, just below Ladd's

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2 hours ago, TomJH said:

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"All I know is I can beat that dumb rabbit every time."

Bugs-Bunny-and-Cecil-Turtle.jpg

"That's not what this movie's about, ya little shrimp!"

MY A NO. 1 ALL-TIME FAVOIRITE CARTOON CHARACTER   I even have WB's/Looney Tunes" checks

 

As most know he was based on GROUCHO the most

 

MY ALL-TIMER WB'S LOONEY TUNES CARTOON IS C"A NIGHT IN HOLLYWOPOD"  However, Bugs only won 1 single *Oscar for 1957's "KNIGHTY KNIGHT BUGS?"   "WHATS OPERA DOC?" IS BETTER

 

(P.S. I got a tremendous shot of Mel Blancs grave "Hollywood forever, cem" it looks like a postcard!

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8 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

It (1927) - This was based on a story by Elinor Glyn, and if you don't know the name, you sure will by the end of the movie. Her name is featured prominently in the opening credits, then in a title card explaining what "IT" is, then in a copy of the story being read by a character in the movie, and then when Glyn shows up for a cameo, playing herself!

Bow's an absolute darling in the movie, and in the scene where she cuts down her shop dress to go out for the evening, it now and forever confirms the theory that she inspired the look of Betty Boop.

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"It" in the '20's was the radical theory that what attracted men was some undefinable chemistry of, not just sexuality, but self-confidence, and Clara is very much the "It Girl" in this movie--It's hard to believe just how much contemporary appeal she has onscreen, despite the 20's bob-caps.

7 hours ago, spence said:

As most know he was based on GROUCHO the most

Except for the animators, who thought they based him on the scene where Clark Gable munches a carrot in "It Happened One Night".

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Please stop trying so hard.  PLEASE.  :(

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Earlier today, I saw a film I never thought i would have the guts to see. And that film was the legendary 1973 horror film The Exorcist. I don't think I could go through it again as it was very hard to view, but at the same time it is a very strong film, very well made, definitely makes an emotional impact, and Ellen Burstyn, Lee J. Cobb, and especially Jason Miller are excellent in the film.

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Lilac Time (1928) - Silent WW1 aviation romance from First National and director George Fitzmaurice. French farmgirl Jeannine (Colleen Moore) lives next to the airfield where the British pilots are stationed. She goofs around with the pilots during their off hours, and she falls in love with newly-arrived Captain Philip Blythe (Gary Cooper). The dangers of wartime aviation insure a sad ending for the couple. Also featuring Eugenie Besserer, Burr McIntosh, Kathryn McGuire, Cleve Moore, and Arthur Lake.

Coming out on the heels of 1927's Wings, which featured Cooper in a noteworthy minor role, this inferior take on a lot of the same material pales in comparison. Moore is often more irritating than endearing, and much of the make-up used on her isn't flattering, to say the least. Cooper, too, looks silly in many scenes. His performance is also nothing to write home about, particularly his cringeworthy emoting during the sappy finale. There are some genuine cute moments, and some nice aerial action, that keep this from being a complete waste of time.   (6/10)

Source: Rarefilmm. This is also available on YouTube.

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58 minutes ago, CinemaInternational said:

Earlier today, I saw a film I never thought i would have the guts to see. And that film was the legendary 1973 horror film The Exorcist. I don't think I could go through it again as it was very hard to view, but at the same time it is a very strong film, very well made, definitely makes an emotional impact, and Ellen Burstyn, Lee J. Cobb, and especially Jason Miller are excellent in the film.

I saw it on Halloween last year. It was well acted but not that scary, just shocking in how vulgar it was at times.

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2 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Bow is cute, and pushes the boundary for what a woman could do, say and look like on screen (near the end of the film as she climbs soaking wet out of the water with her clothing clinging to her, leaving little to the imagination, comes to mind).

Clara was definitely the 'It' girl, but I thought the backside shot of her co-star looked more skin-tight and shapely to me. :)

Interestingly enough, Clara makes several appearances in the Ozu movie Walk Cheerfully. Her poster from Rough House Rosie hangs on the main character's wall in his apartment, and features quite prominently in the mise-en-scene of some scenes.

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The Viking (1928) - Two-strip Technicolor historical adventure flick from MGM and director Roy William Neill. Hero and explorer Leif Ericsson (Donald Crisp) hopes to set sail to the west of Greenland for lands unknown. Among his crew are warrior woman Helga (Pauline Starke), her devious fiancee Egil (Harry Woods) and recently captured English slave Alwin (LeRoy Mason). Leif is impressed with Alwin's courage and strength, but so is Helga, which drives Egil to plotting. Also featuring Anders Randolf, Albert MacQuarrie, Roy Stewart, Torben Meyer, Claire McDowell, Julia Swayne Gordon, Angelo Rossitto, and Iron Eyes Cody.

This was made primarily as a showcase for the new Technicolor process, and was in fact made independently by that company before selling it to MGM for distribution. The color is primitive, but it adds an unusual appeal to the proceedings. Crisp is excellent as the broad-shouldered hero, and LeRoy Mason, who would go on to play a number of bad guys in the years to follow, is pretty good as the English slave. The costumes and settings are eye-catching, even if historically inaccurate, and the Thor statue is a sight to see.    (7/10)

Source: TCM.

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Bewitched (1945) - Psychological thriller from MGM and director Arch Oboler. Joan Alris Ellis (Phyllis Thaxter) is a seemingly normal young woman who suddenly begins hearing a voice in her head that commands her to do evil things. How far will the voice push her, and will her new love interest Eric (Stephen McNally) be able to do anything to help her? Also featuring Edmund Gwenn, Henry H. Daniels Jr., Addison Richards, Kathleen Lockhart, Francis Pierlot, Gladys Blake, Will Wright, Minor Watson, and the voice of Audrey Totter.

Psychological stories would become popular subject matter in the post-war years, as more Americans began to examine their inner selves and psychoanalysis became more common place and accepted. This early split-personality tale is clumsy in a low-budget way, and seems a bit corny now, but for the time it's an effective thriller. Stephen McNally, here credited as "Horace McNally", is good as the concerned boyfriend, as is Edmund Gwenn as a kindly psychologist.   (6/10)

Source: TCM.

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Thanks, I saw this one a long time ago  (about 20 years ago)  in L.A.  It continues to be a very good thriller and

a good story for all concerned about the witchcraft//thriller about a girl who is concerned that someone else will

take the supposed rival for her boyfriend's love.   

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On 5/16/2018 at 2:39 PM, LawrenceA said:

Uncertain Glory (1944) - French-set war drama from Warner Brothers and director Raoul Walsh. After condemned murderer Jean Picard (Errol Flynn) escapes the guillotine during an air raid, Inspector Marcel Bonet (Paul Lukas) tracks him down and captures him, intent on taking him back to fulfill his death sentence. However, the occupying Germans have recently been beset by saboteurs, and in retaliation, they have arrested over a hundred local citizens and will execute them unless the saboteurs reveal themselves. Picard suggests that he turn himself in as the saboteur since he's a condemned man anyway, and therefore the innocent captives will be spared. Bonet reluctantly agrees, but whether or not the wily Picard means to go through with his ruse is uncertain. Also featuring Lucile Watson, Faye Emerson, Jean Sullivan, James Flavin, Douglass Dumbrille, Dennis Hoey, Odette Myrtil, Francis Pierlot, and Sheldon Leonard.

This is more of a low-key drama than the action spectacle I expected with Flynn in the lead and director Walsh at the helm. The movie keeps you guessing as to which way Flynn will go, as his character vacillates between fulfilling his promise and escaping with his life. This was one of the better roles that I've seen Paul Lukas in, a sort of then-modern Javert who struggles between his law-and-order duty and his patriotic sense in defeating the Germans. Lucile Watson gets a few good scenes as a local woman enraged over her son being taken prisoner by the Germans, and who is determined to get him back regardless of the moral cost.   (7/10)

Source: TCM.

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This movie was not that well-received when it was released, but viewing it today, it has one of Flynn's more nuanced performances.

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The Five Little Pepper and How They Grew -- I must have read this book half a dozen times when I was between the ages of 10 and 12, and I adored it and wanted to be like Polly.   The book was written around the turn of the century, but of course, the film is set in the Depression.  I thought it was charming, and the kids were very natural.  Little Phronsie was a real scene-stealer.  I thought the subsequent entries in the series less strong, and the butler sleeping with kids was actually kind of creepy.

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THE BAND WAGON (1953) 

Starring: Fred Astaire, Cyd Charisse, Jack Buchanan, Oscar Levant, & Nanette Fabray 

I have never seen this movie before now, which is shocking, considering how obsessed with musicals I am. It was interesting how many of the songs I'd heard before. This is the only thing I've seen of Fabray's (rip), but I thought she was entertaining and a good addition to the cast. Fred's and Cyd's dancing was, as always, sublime. I think my favorite number was the last number: "Girl Hunt" (a murder mystery in jazz). It was very well done, in my opinion. 

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SCORE: 3.5/5 

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Blithe Spirit (1945) - British supernatural comedy based on the play by Noel Coward, from United Artists and director David Lean. Novelist Charles (Rex Harrison) invites spirit medium Madame Arcati (Margaret Rutherford) over to his home for a seance in order to study her methods for a new book that he's working on. Charles' wife Ruth (Constance Cummings) is annoyed but puts up with it, much to her regret, as the seance results in the manifestation of Charles' deceased first wife Elvira (Kay Hammond) who refuses to leave and causes all sorts of mischief. Also featuring Hugh Wakefield, Joyce Carey, Jacqueline Clarke, and Marie Ault.

This had been a smash hit play both in the UK and on Broadway, and Coward himself produced this film adaptation. Director Lean and cinematographer Ronald Neame use crisp Technicolor photography to help ground the outlandish happenings in reality. The performances are all very good, with Rutherford stealing the whole show as the eccentric spiritualist. The movie won an Oscar for Best Special Effects.    (7/10)

Source: FilmStruck.

250px-Blithe_Spirit_-_UK_film_poster.jpg

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13 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

The_Voice_of_the_Turtle_FilmPoster.jpeg

I just watched oddly titled THE VOICE OF THE TURTLE '47 recorded from TCM last month. It starred the always gorgeous, understated Eleanor Parker who was great despite her sporting Barbara Stanwyck's ugly helmet like wig from DOUBLE INDEMNITY.
Co starring is the wonderful Eve Arden who pretty much played her best charactor-the jaded, smart, saucy retort glamor gal we all love. For once she had lots of screen time for us to enjoy. The "man" was el blando Ronald Reagan, but his calm demeanor & good looks fit the part well.

The movie was a typical love triangle soaper, set in war time of best friends on extreme ends of the spectrum-Parker is a pushover while Arden is street wise considering their relationships with men. What was shocking to me -shocking I say- was the open way pre marital sex was discussed by the two gals. They discussed the problems of "allowing a man to make love to you" which often means wooing foreplay, but as they talked further you realized they were discussing intercourse.
It was pretty progressive for Arden to dismiss her various partners & activity as just "playing around" in a movie of the 40's. It truly showed women's sexual liberation which started with the flappers had progressed to more traditional young girls during war time. (and we all know what happened in the 70's with the pill)

I really liked this movie, although I'm still very puzzled about the title. Maybe I dozed off when it was explained.

I really enjoyed this film too.  I believe it also has the alternate title "One for the Book."  As for the title, doesn't Parker quote a bible passage or something that discusses "the voice of the turtle" ? Or maybe I'm imagining it? I did some research and apparently the title is from the bible and it's supposed to be some type of statement about love.  I agree wholeheartedly about Parker's hair in this film, it was awful.  I even thought that Ronald Reagan was pretty good in this film.  I also loved Eve Arden in this film and I found both her, and the idea that Parker would allow a man (that she really doesn't even know that well) spend the night in her apartment very forward for 1947. I'm surprised that the production code wasn't all over that.  

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Re BLITHE SPIRIT

250px-Blithe_Spirit_-_UK_film_poster.jpg

I love this movie's smart & tart dialogue & agree Margaret Rutherford steals every scene she's in. Whenever I see her name in a movie's credits now, I make sure to see it.

I really loved how they costumed, made up & lit the spirit Elvira (Kay Hammond) kind of pale & blue. Much more clever and believable than any CGI effects of today. But boy I couldn't stand her VOICE. Kay Hammond as a ghost would be truly haunting, having to listen to her driveling whiney voice through all eternity.
You didn't mention the movie's ending, which I thought was pretty cute.

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12 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Bewitched (1945) - Psychological thriller from MGM and director Arch Oboler.

e494941ca4e2af206fe4f221c18320c5.jpg

1. that is a great poster

2. i don't think i've ever seen a film directed by ARCH OBOLER, but in terms of radio, he was ahead of his time. i''ve listened to quite a few episodes of LIGHTS OUT, the suspense radio show he did and there is an amazing streak of social consciousness in many of the episodes, including one that is critical of and set in a Japanese Internment Camp (made ca. 1943!) and a ghost story (of sorts) featuring, I swear, Ingrid Bergman as a woman in a town in France who is executed repeatedly (you have to hear it to understand) by a Nazi Commander in a conquered town.

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10 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Blithe Spirit (1945) -

250px-Blithe_Spirit_-_UK_film_poster.jpg

I love this movie (i can see the seeds for all the later British Horror Anthologies as well as DEATH BECOMES HER being sown), but I hate this poster. It has to be for a re-release, no?

Harpo, who dis woman? She ain't in the movie.

Looks like they made a mistake at the ad agency and accidentally used a Maidenform Ad ca. 1961.

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