speedracer5

I Just Watched...

12,206 posts in this topic

A Stolen Life (1946) - Romantic melodrama from Warner Brothers and director Curtis Bernhardt. Bette Davis stars as aspiring artist Kate Bosworth, who travels to a small New England coastal village to paint. She meets and falls for local fellow Bill (Glenn Ford), but a complication pops up: Kate's twin sister Patricia (also Davis). The more assertive Pat quickly seduces Bill away from Kate, with unforeseen consequences for all. Also featuring Walter Brennan, Charlie Ruggles, Dane Clark, Bruce Bennett, Peggy Knudsen, Esther Dale, Clara Blandick, Joan Winfield, and Monte Blue.

Davis does an excellent job differentiating between the two sisters without a lot of obvious costume, makeup, or actorly tricks. She's showing her age more (Davis didn't age very well), but she's not relying on her particular "Bette Davis" mannerisms yet. Ford is blandly handsome without really adding anything of note, but Brennan and Ruggles offer reliable support. The camera effects used to show both Davis characters on screen together are very good for the time. They earned an Oscar nomination for Best Special Effects.   (7/10)

Source: TCM.

715507-b.jpg

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

EARLY MAN (2018) 

Eh. I like Aardman's other works (Wallace and Gromit, Chicken Run) but this one wasn't as memorable. Glad I didn't spend money on it in theaters. It's honestly just "okay." They got some star power in there with Eddie Redmayne, Tom Hiddleston, Timothy Spall. and Maisie Williams, but even they couldn't save this abysmally dull movie. I'd honestly rather watch one of Disney's biggest mistakes, Dinosaur or all the "Air Bud" sequels (you know, the ones with the puppies). 

Score: 1.5/5. 

Image result for early man 2018

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/31/2018 at 8:57 PM, LawrenceA said:

Nobody Lives Forever (1946) - Crime drama from Warner Brothers and director Jean Negulesco. John Garfield stars as Nick Blake, a career con artist who has just been discharged from the Army. He meets up with old pal Al (George Tobias), and when things don't shake out in their NYC stomping grounds, they head west to L.A. Once there, an old contact named Pop (Walter Brennan) connects them with seedy crook Doc Ganson (George Coulouris) who wants to Nick to spearhead a long con a wealthy widow (Geraldine Fitzgerald). But wouldn't you know it, real love blossoms between Nick and the mark, which leads to trouble for all. Also featuring Faye Emerson, Robert Shayne, Richard Gaines, Richard Erdman, James Flavin, Ralph Peters, and Grady Sutton.

Garfield is a natural at playing the tough, inwardly complex Blake. He exudes menace when necessary, and compassion just as well. Fitzgerald is also good, an offbeat casting choice that ends up being memorable. Faye Emerson looks like a custom-made noir doll, while Coulouris is excellent as the sweaty, bug-eyed Doc. My only complaints would be some unneeded comic relief that throws the mood, and a protracted finale that is poorly constructed.   (7/10)

Source: TCM.

nobodylives.jpeg

Much agreement from me, Lawrence, especially about the excellence of Garfield, Fitzgerald, and Emerson. I'd add that this is perhaps my favorite Walter Brennan performance, as he plays a world-weary con man and doesn't open his usual bag of cute.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Till the Clouds Roll By (1946) - Technicolor musical biopic from MGM and director Richard Whorf*. The film tells the (fictionalized) life story of songwriter Jerome Kern (Robert Walker), who would become one of the leading figures in American musical theater of the early twentieth century. He finds friendship and collaboration with arranger James Hessler (Van Heflin), and romance with Eva (Dorothy Patrick). Featuring a large cast of musical stars, including Judy Garland, June Allyson, Lena Horne, Kathryn Grayson, Virginia O'Brien, Lucille Bremer, Van Johnson, Tony Martin, Dinah Shore, Gower Champion, Cyd Charisse, Angela Lansbury, and Frank Sinatra. Also with Harry Hayden, Paul Langton, Mary Nash, Byron Foulger, and Joan Wells.

This movie is really an extended music video of the songs of Kern performed by stars of the 1940's, rather than a traditional biography. Little is really explored about Kern the man. His early life is never touched upon, nor much of his personal life beyond the Hollywood-ized courtship of his wife. So the movie fails in regards to biographical drama. But it succeeds with its musical numbers, especially a grandiose finale on a huge, elaborate set. 

*Richard Whorf gets the sole final director's credit, but in truth that position was constantly being changed. Lemuel Ayers began the movie, and was succeeded by Busby Berkeley, and then Henry Koster, before Whorf came in to finish things up. Vincente Minelli also directed the scenes with Judy Garland.    (6/10)

Source: Warner DVD.

x240-mvr.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Trap (1946) - End of an era in this long-running mystery series, from Monogram and director Howard Bretherton. Charlie Chan (Sidney Toler), along with son Jimmy (Victor Sen Yung) and chauffeur Birmingham Brown (Mantan Moreland), is on the case of a murder that was committed in a beach house full of beautiful young showgirls. The suspect pool is large, and the murderer may strike again before Charlie can find the culprit. Also featuring Kirk Alyn, Tanis Chandler, Larry J. Blake, Rita Quigley, Anne Nagel, Helen Gerald, Minerva Urecal, and Barbara Jean Wong. 

This case is pretty dull, and the movie features some really bad acting from some of the showgirls. Sadly, this would mark the final outing for Sidney Toler as Chan. He was suffering through the final stages of cancer while filming, and he would pass in February of 1947. Toler played Chan in 22 films, more than any other actor.   (5/10)

Source: Warner DVD.

iW2Eg5RrCvBnEzryBDlYmBipvgB.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Two Guys from Milwaukee (1946) - Affable comedy from Warner Brothers and director David Butler. Balkan prince Henry (Dennis Morgan) travels to the US to observe American ways (and to meet Lauren Bacall). He bumps into cab driver Buzz (Jack Carson) who agrees to escort the prince on a tour of the "real America", complete with greasy-spoon diners, cheap booze, and a date with a pair of manicurists (Joan Leslie and Janis Paige). Also featuring S.Z. Sakall, Rosemary DeCamp, Patti Brady, Tom D'Andrea, John Ridgely, Lex Barker, Patricia Barry, and Franklin Pangborn.

Carson and Morgan were a frequent screen pairing and they work well off of each other. The scenario isn't groundbreaking, and the Americanism gets a bit hokey at the end, but the performers are all likable, and while there aren't any laugh out loud moments, I generally had a smile throughout.    (6/10)

Source: TCM.

TwoGuysFromMilwaukeeLobby.jpg

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Utamaro and His Five Women (1946) - Japanese melodrama from Shochiku and director Kenji Mizoguchi. In feudal-era Japan, artist Utamaro (Minosuke Bando) specializes in drawings of the female form. This brings him into contact with many beautiful women, and various romantic entanglements between them and their various suitors. Featuring Kotaro Bando, Kinuyo Tanaka, Hiroko Kawasaki, Toshiko Iizuka, Kyoko Kusajima, Eiko Ohara, and Shotaro Nakamura.

I have a hard time warming to Mizoguchi's films, as I find the characters distant and indistinct. While that's true for several here as well, I found Kinuyo Tanaka to be a stand out as a jealous tearoom waitress determined to get back the man she loves from a courtesan. There are also a few memorably shot scenes, like a walk through a sunlit forest, and a violent confrontation at night.    (7/10)

Source: FilmStruck.

Utamaro-and-His-Five-Women-1401042576-71

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Virginian (1946) - Uninspired Technicolor adaptation of Owen Wister's western novel, from Paramount Pictures and director Stuart Gilmore. In the small ranch town of Medicine Bow, newly arrived schoolteacher Molly Wood (Barbara Britton) becomes the object of affection for best friend cowboys Steve (Sonny Tufts) and the Virginian (Joel McCrea). Things take a darker turn when Steve starts working with cattle rustlers led by Trampas (Brian Donlevy). Also featuring Fay Bainter, William Frawley, Tom Tully, Henry O'Neill, Bill Edwards, Paul Guilfoyle, Joseph Crehan, Harry Hayden, Minerva Urecal, and Marc Lawrence.

This had been filmed several times previously, most notably the 1929 version with Gary Cooper, and would go on to loosely inspire a long-running TV series. This version doesn't bring anything new or interesting to the table, other than being in color. The cast is fine, if unexceptional, and things are shot in a pedestrian fashion. Totally inoffensive, and totally unremarkable.   (5/10)

Source: Universal DVD.

v1.bTsxMTIyNDE0NDtqOzE3NzY5OzEyMDA7MTUzN

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

THE GHOST AND MR. CHICKEN (1966)

Starring: Don Knotts, Joan Staley, Dick Sargent, Reta Shaw, & Jesslyn Fax and Harry Hickox (both supporting players in 1962's The Music Man). 

Knotts stars as a rather timid, friendless fellow named Luther Heggs, who is a type-setter at the local newspaper, but dreams of becoming a real reporter. Luther gets dared to spend the night in the Simmons mansion (the town's own "haunted house"). The mansion was the location of an infamous murder-suicide, and none of the townspeople will go near it, let alone inside it. Luther accepts the dare (mostly to impress his crush, Alma) and ends up witnessing several spooky happenings inside the mansion. He reports on these things in the next edition of the newspaper, and instantly becomes a local celebrity, but ultimately finds himself in a court of law, defending himself and the things he's seen against the only living Simmons descendant's accusations of slander. 

Overall enjoyable. Knotts does a great job at being a jumpy, nervous fellow and entertained me to no end. Joan Staley served as his love interest, and she was quite likable. Score: 3/5. 

Image result for the ghost and mr chicken

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Open Secret (1948)

A little "B" that follows in the path of the previous year's Crossfire and Gentleman's Agreement in its exploration of anti-Semitism in a small town.

John Ireland and Jane Randolph play a pair of newlyweds who arrive in an unnamed town and are invited to stay at the apartment of an old service buddy of Ireland's. Only the buddy isn't there (they're told he'll be back by the landlady who lets them into his apartment). But as time passes the friend is a no show and there's a growing feeling that something sinister may be afloat, especially when the couple discover some white supremacist pamphlets hidden in a drawer.

In the early stages the film hints at the prejudice in the town, with talk about "foreigners" and "staying with their own kind". Later, though, it becomes more blatant, with the word "k i k e" making no doubt about the object of the hatred. That bigotry insidiously trickles down to the neighbourhood kids, too, slashing the tires of a car of a Jewish merchant (George Tyne in a quite effective performance), as well as preparing to throw rocks through his window.

The film has the visual elements of noir with its shadowy photography, appropriate for such a dark subject. The overall effect of the messaging in this film is, unfortunately, rather muted. The performances are adequate but restrained. However Roman Bohnen is appropriately loutish as a drunken bigot who, at one moment strikes his wife (Ellen Lowe) across the face in a tavern.

And here this little "B" briefly, and tellingly, raises another ugly subject rarely broached in '40s dramas, spousal abuse. That is never more poignantly apparent than in the dialogue Lowe later delivers to Ireland in one powerful scene:

“Tell you what?  How for the last five years he hasn’t drawn a sober breath?  How he beats me to prove that he’s better than I am?  He’s a man.  How he throws out the few flowers I pick, says they stink up the house.  How he can’t keep a job?  Always blames it on to the k i k e s and the wops… never on to himself.  How he’s broken me.  Torn me to pieces.  Is that what you want me to tell you?”

Dialogue like that still has a strong impact, in combination with the tired anguish of Ellen Lowe's face and delivery.

There are a couple of prints of Open Secret currently available on You Tube.

220px-Open_Secret_film_poster.jpeg

2.5 out of 4

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wanted for Murder aka A Voice in the Night (1946) - British serial killer/police procedural from 20th Century Fox and director Lawrence Huntington. Eric Portman stars as Victor Colebrooke, an upper class gentleman who is also a serial strangler of women. As the body count continues to rise, he tries to find redemption in the love of shopgirl Anne (Dulcie Gray), while Anne is also seeing busman Jack (Derek Farr). Meanwhile, Scotland Yard Inspector Conway (Roland Culver) and Sgt. Sullivan (Stanley Holloway) try to piece together the clues before the killer can strike again. Also featuring Barbara Everest, Bonar Colleano, Jenny Laird, Kathleen Harrison, Bill Shine, and Wilfred Hyde-White.

Emeric Pressburger worked on the screenplay for this decent psychological thriller. Since the identity of the killer is known to the audience from the get-go, the suspense lies in watching the police and those around the killer trying to catch on before it's too late. Portman is very good as the tormented killer who thinks he is bedeviled by the spirit of his long-dead hangman father. I was also impressed with Culver as the dogged Inspector.   (7/10)

Source: FilmStruck.

220px-Wanted_for_Murder_FilmPoster.jpeg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Endless Night (1972):  I like to think Agatha Christie's novel was better than this somewhat bizarre screen adaptation..but I've never read it (and now have no desire to..).  Hayley Mills gets top billing, although Hywel Bennett gets the most screen time, as he 'tells' the story of how he met Mills.  Bennett was a sort of ne'er do well chauffeur who considered himself quite the authority on art, meets really rich girl Mills..and to make a long disjointed story short..they marry.  There are a hoarde of relatives and neighbors who you think might have something to do with something...but they just wander in and out.  Mills, who has a difficult time with her 'Anmerican' accent, only trusts one person--Britt Ekland (she was hired as a German tudor, but stayed on as 'companion') The only 'relative' who gets any scenes at all is George Sanders, an advisor she calls 'uncle'.  Usually so paced and cool, you get the uncomfortable feeling Sanders is in an uncharaciteristic  hurry to get his lines out.  Anyway..there's an overly emotional architect (Per Oscarsson) who designs a modern house for them, and a strange old lady who just hovers around after warning them not to move there.  The house has lots of interesting features (like a swimming pool under the living room floor) controlled by a giant clicker, and the furnishings are an odd combo of old-world art and wrought iron next to track lighting and chrome.  Three of the characters end up dead, and despite watching the death bed scene of Oscarsson twice, I still don't get why he's dying.  Mills, despite the dialect problems, is the only one that turned in much of a performance here..Bennett is just okay, and Ekland, a really beautiful woman, is pretty bad (she does have one screaming scene that's believable). Frequent flashes of images don't add a thing and the whole production just feels jerky.  Despite the label 'drama/mystery/horror', don't expect much of any.  The only horror is the presence of what are referred to as 'wasps' at a party, but close-ups show they are just honeybees--even the bugs were badly miscast. Can't recommend this one, even to die-hard Christie fans. source: terrarium                                                                           Related image  

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My wife and I just watched The Letter. It was marvelous. Bette Davis was fantastic as she always is and the film, though not considered a Film Noir, has many of the characteristics we all have come to expect from that genre. As usual Eddie Mueller's introduction and epilogue added so much to our viewing experience. We're hooked on Noir Alley and look forward to our next venture into the darkness.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Black Gold (1947) - Equestrian family drama from Allied Artists and director Phil Karlson. Orphaned Chinese-American boy Davey (Ducky Louie) gets adopted by restless Native American horse trainer Charley Eagle (Anthony Quinn) and his wife Sarah (Katherine DeMille). Together, Davey and Charley try to raise a horse worthy of competing in the Kentucky Derby, while overcoming various obstacles due to their races. Also featuring Elyse Knox, Raymond Hatton, Kane Richmond, Thurston Hall, Moroni Olsen, Jonathan Hale, Eddie Acuff, and Darryl Hickman.

This low-budget color (Cinecolor) effort was spearheaded by Quinn, who produced (uncredited) and got a rare starring role for this period of his career. He hams it up terribly, but much of the film is overly sentimental sap. Katherine DeMille is much better as the quiet, reserved wife, a role that she played off screen as well, thus the two stars' natural chemistry. A lot of the movie is standard horse story fare, with the ups and downs before the finale with the big race. The remainder of the film deals superficially with various racial issues regarding the treatment of Native Americans and Chinese Americans. This aspect is impressive for the time, and if it had been explored a little more this would have been more memorable. Anthony Quinn appeared in about a half dozen movies in 1947, and then quit the business for several years, moving to New York to study acting and appear on stage. His next film wasn't until 1951.   (5/10)

Source: TCM.

318-2014513152916_540x360.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, shutoo said:

Endless Night (1972):  

1. I like to think Agatha Christie's novel was better than this somewhat bizarre screen adaptation..but I've never read it (and now have no desire to..).   

2. The only horror is the presence of what are referred to as 'wasps' at a party, but close-ups show they are just honeybees--even the bugs were badly miscast.

3. Can't recommend this one, even to die-hard Christie fans. source: terrarium                                                         4.                  Related image  

1. I've read it, it's not, really...although it's not completely uninteresting...Christie was a MUCH MUCH MUCH better writer than she gets credit for, but while i hate to sound ageist, she probably should have retired in the sixties. her later novels are frustrating, because the execution is just off.

2. HA!

3. Yeah, me either. But your review is terrific!

4. (that poster) Three out of a hundred huh? I'd wager the other 97 were either making out or didn't give a rip.

 

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i see your 1946 retrospective has ended Lawrence.

While 1943 is my favorite (I think) and 1940, 1950, 1962 and 1939 are all singularly impressive years in filmdom, there is something about the quality of the output of 1946 that makes me rank it right up there with the best.

it was the last year where HOLLYWOOD (and England) balanced darkness with light, before the bleak, psychological trio of 1947, 1948 and 1949 cast their shadow over the screen (not that those are bad years!)

the films are real and the subjects are intense, but there is still the shine of optimism left over from before the war (although there are some relentlessly dark pictures too, THE STRANGER comes to mind immediately.)

it was also an incredible year for Actresses, just a lot of great roles for women, albeit many of them walking a line between lead and supporting.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, NickAndNora34 said:

THE GHOST AND MR. CHICKEN (1966)

Starring: Don Knotts, Joan Staley, Dick Sargent, Reta Shaw, & Jesslyn Fax and Harry Hickox (both supporting players in 1962's The Music Man). 

Knotts stars as a rather timid, friendless fellow named Luther Heggs, who is a type-setter at the local newspaper, but dreams of becoming a real reporter. Luther gets dared to spend the night in the Simmons mansion (the town's own "haunted house"). The mansion was the location of an infamous murder-suicide, and none of the townspeople will go near it, let alone inside it. Luther accepts the dare (mostly to impress his crush, Alma) and ends up witnessing several spooky happenings inside the mansion. He reports on these things in the next edition of the newspaper, and instantly becomes a local celebrity, but ultimately finds himself in a court of law, defending himself and the things he's seen against the only living Simmons descendant's accusations of slander. 

Overall enjoyable. Knotts does a great job at being a jumpy, nervous fellow and entertained me to no end. Joan Staley served as his love interest, and she was quite likable. Score: 3/5. 

Image result for the ghost and mr chicken

Atta boy, Luther!!!

  • Haha 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Painted Veil (1934). I've had this film on my DVR for ages and finally watched it.  I loved Garbo in this, she's quite Hepburn-esque, with a good sense of humour. Poor Herbert Marshall, who was cuckolded by wife Dietrich in Blonde Venus, gets the same treatment here, from Garbo, who has a fling with an unusually slimy George Brent. (They are basically all in China fighting cholera.)

Production values are high, with lots of Chinese artifacts and ceremonies. In the end, Garbo realizes that she really loves her husband. 

the-painted-veil-year-1934-director-rich

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/25/2018 at 4:08 PM, LawrenceA said:

Cornered (1945) - Post-war revenge noir from RKO and director Edward Dmytryk. Canadian soldier and former P.O.W. Laurence Gerard (Dick Powell) is on the hunt for the man responsible for his wife's murder. His quest takes him to Buenos Aires, where the multi-cultural population of various ex-pats make it a hotbed of intrigue and double-crosses. Also featuring Walter Slezak, Morris Carnovsky, Nina Vale, Micheline Cheirel, Edgar Barrier, Steven Geray, Jack La Rue, Gregory Gaye, Ellen Corby, Cy Kendall, Nestor Paiva, Byron Foulger, and Luther Adler.

I thought Powell was very good as the desperate, damaged Gerard, his outward physical injuries (he's sporting a scar across his temple and is subject to severe headaches) match those on his soul, and one gets the feeling that the only thing keeping him going is his rage against the mysterious man behind his wife's death. That character is eventually shown and wonderfully played by Luther Adler in one of the better very small roles that I've seen in recent memory. Walter Slezak is good as a shifty tour guide, and he seems like a cross of the then popular duo of Peter Lorre and Sydney Greenstreet. The script is a little muddled at times, but it comes together for a satisfying, if violent, finale.   (7/10)

Source: Warner DVD, part of the Film Noir Classic Collection, Volume Five.

220px-Cornered1S.jpg

Cornered reminded me of Murder, My Sweet, from 1944, with the same star and director.  The sets were even similar.  While the big reveal may have struck some as anti-climactic, I found it honest and not gimmicky. Jack La Rue as Diego is the opposite of his villain roles, particularly The Story of Temple Drake (1933), but he’s still menacing.  I look at him and see Sollozzo from The Godfather.  They have the same look and persona.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Calendar Girl (1947) - Routine musical from Republic Pictures and director Allen Dwan. It's 1900, and Boston buddies Johnny Bennett (William Marshall) and Byron Jones (Kenny Baker) move to NYC to make their names. Johnny is a songwriter, and Byron is a painter, and they both fall for would be showgirl Patricia (Jane Frazee). This annoys Patricia's police chief father Matthew (Victor McLaglen). Also featuring Gail Patrick, Irene Rich, James Ellison, Franklin Pangborn, Janet Martin, Gus Schilling, Charles Arnt, Lou Nova, Gina Corrado, and Ethelreda Leopold.

This reminded me of a Fox musical done on the cheap and in B&W. I don't know the 3 leads, and while they seem pleasant enough, I don't think this movie will cement them in my memory any further. McLaglen only has a few scenes in which to bluster and bully.    (5/10)

Source: Mill Creek DVD.

92958-calendar-girl-0-230-0-345-crop.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

i see your 1946 retrospective has ended Lawrence.

Was waiting for Port of Call (1946), Ingmar Bergman's second film. Some of his early films get short shrift because they are nearly always unfavorably compared to the later stuff, and although that's not surprising, care should nevertheless be taken not to under value them IMO.  The movie is a zinger for me. I would like to say what I like about it and I will later on.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, laffite said:

Was waiting for Port of Call (1946), Ingmar Bergman's second film. Some of his early films get short shrift because they are nearly always unfavorably compared to the later stuff, and although that's not surprising, care should nevertheless be taken not to under value them IMO.  The movie is a zinger for me. I would like to say what I like about it and I will later on.

Port of Call is from 1948. I have it in my FilmStruck watchlist for when I get to '48.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My favorite films of 1946 are THE STRANGER, CLUNY BROWN, A MATTER OF LIFE AND DEATH, THE BIG SLEEP and BEST YEARS. 

I also like ANNA AND THE KING OF SIAM, THE BEAST WITH FIVE FINGERS, THE LOCKET, TO EACH HIS OWN, MY REPUTATION, BRIEF ENCOUNTER, THE SPIRAL STAIRCASE, THE HARVEY GIRLS, LA BELLE ET LA BETE, NOTORIOUS, DEVOTION (even if it was made in 1943), THE STRANGE LOVE OF MARTHA IVERS, THE KILLERS and THE TIME OF THEIR LIVES. 

and while I'm not partial to HENRY V, HUMORESQUE, THE DARK MIRROR, THE DARK CORNER, MY DARLING CLEMENTINE, THE YEARLING, and THE RAZORS EDGE, and ITS A WONDERFUL LIFE (Sue me, I root for Potter)- they have their fans 

i had a migraine Saturday night, so I missed THREE STRANGERS, but it is also a 1946 film.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Captain from Castile (1947) - Technicolor historical epic from 20th Century Fox and director Henry King. Set in the early 16th century, the story follows the exploits of Spaniard Pedro De Vargas (Tyrone Power), the son of a noble family who is forced to become a fugitive by the Inquisition, under the local control of the corrupt Diego De Silva (John Sutton). Vargas escapes to Cuba along with new friend Juan Garcia (Lee J. Cobb) and lowly servant girl Catana (Jean Peters). They all join the expedition of Hernando Cortez (Cesar Romero) into central Mexico and the land of the Aztecs in search of gold and glory. Also featuring Thomas Gomez, Alan Mowbray, Marc Lawrence, Jay Silverheels, Antonio Moreno, Barbara Lawrence, Roy Roberts, Virginia Brissac, Reed Hadley, Chris-Pin Martin, and George Zucco.

Based on a then-recent bestseller, this was a very expensive movie for Fox, and it wasn't without production troubles. Original leading lady Linda Darnell was yanked away to try and save Forever Amber, and the little-known Jean Peters was her replacement. I don't dislike Peters, but Darnell would have been much better. The film also had to tone down several aspects of the book: the Catholic Church complained about the depiction of the Spanish Inquisition, so the filmmakers put a non-clergy civilian in charge (the villain played by John Sutton, who does a good job with the role); and the atrocities committed by Cortez and his army against the natives are whitewashed almost completely out of the picture. On the plus side, the costumes and sets are fantastic, and the score is very good. The film only covers about half of the book's contents, despite running nearly 2 and a half hours, and the resolution to the movie is weak. I don't know if they planned a follow-up since that wasn't as common at the time, but the film's poor box office negated the prospect. It still ended up earning an Oscar nomination for Best Score (Alfred Newman).     (7/10)

Source: Fox Movie Channel.

MV5BNjExYmM2YTctZGFiMS00NDJhLWJlODctZDk3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

My favorite films of 1946 are THE STRANGER, CLUNY BROWN, A MATTER OF LIFE AND DEATH, THE BIG SLEEP and BEST YEARS. 

I also like ANNA AND THE KING OF SIAM, THE BEAST WITH FIVE FINGERS, THE LOCKET, TO EACH HIS OWN, MY REPUTATION, BRIEF ENCOUNTER, THE SPIRAL STAIRCASE, THE HARVEY GIRLS, LA BELLE ET LA BETE, NOTORIOUS, DEVOTION (even if it was made in 1943), THE STRANGE LOVE OF MARTHA IVERS, THE KILLERS and THE TIME OF THEIR LIVES. 

and while I'm not partial to HENRY V, HUMORESQUE, THE DARK MIRROR, THE DARK CORNER, MY DARLING CLEMENTINE, THE YEARLING, and THE RAZORS EDGE, and ITS A WONDERFUL LIFE (Sue me, I root for Potter)- they have their fans 

i had a migraine Saturday night, so I missed THREE STRANGERS, but it is also a 1946 film.

46 was a great year! I do like Humoresque and The Dark Corner (it has Lucy in a noir!).  My favorites from 1946 are: The Big Sleep, Deception, Gilda, The Harvey Girls, The Locket, My Reputation, Never Say Goodbye, Notorious, The Postman Always Rings Twice, The Spiral Staircase, A Stolen Life, The Stranger, and Tomorrow is Forever.  

I have Cluny Brown recorded on my DVR, but I haven't watched it yet.  I'm sure that I'll enjoy it.  I like Ernst Lubitsch's other films.  I just watched Trouble in Paradise for the first time last night and loved it. 

Didn't Brief Encounter come out in 1945? Either way, I really liked that movie too. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

New Members:

Register Here

Learn more about the new message boards:

FAQ

Having problems?

Contact Us