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Trail Street (1947) - Average western from RKO and director Ray Enright. It's cattlemen versus farmers in the small Kansas town of Liberal. Real estate man Allen Harper (Robert Ryan) tries to help the farmers make a go of things in the rough Kansas terrain, but the cattlemen, led by Logan Maury (Steve Brodie), use violence and intimidation to chase the farmers away. What the town needs is a strong lawman, so local Billy Jones (George "Gabby" Hayes) sends for his old friend Bat Masterson (Randolph Scott) to get things in order. Also featuring Anne Jeffreys as the "bad saloon girl", Madge Meredith as the "good girl", Billy House, Virginia Sale, Harry Woods, Phil Warren, Harry Harvey, and Jason Robards Sr.

This unexceptional effort marked Ryan's first film after his stint in the Marines during WW2. He gets to be a romantic lead and all-around good guy, although his screen persona would shift dramatically later in the year when Crossfire was released. Scott often seems almost like an afterthought, although he gets several "quiet tough guy" moments. Gabby Hayes may test some viewers' nerves, depending on their tolerance of his usual shtick.   (6/10)

Source: TCM.

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3 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

They Made Me a Fugitive aka I Became a Criminal (1947) - Violent British crime drama from Warner Brothers and director Alberto Cavalcanti. Trevor Howard stars as Clem, an ex-RAF pilot who can't find work so he joins up with a criminal gang run by Narcy (Griffith Jones). When Narcy takes a disliking to Clem, he has him set-up on a manslaughter charge and sent to prison. Clem later escapes and goes seeking revenge, with a lot of obstacles along the way. Also featuring Sally Gray, Rene Ray, Charles Farrell, Michael Brennan, Jack McNaughton, Cyril Smith, Peter Bull, Sebastian Cabot, and Mary Merrall.

This is one hard-edged, grimy crime picture for its day. The violence is shocking, and one brutal beating of a woman is particularly unpleasant. Griffith Jones makes for a really hissable villain, while Howard excels as the weary but resolute Clem. Top billed Sally Gray gets the big "acting" moments as Narcy's girl who takes a shine to Clem. For those who like the darker side of life (and cinema), this is worthwhile. More sensitive viewers may be repelled.   (7/10)

Source: FilmStruck. They have the full, original 101 minute version. Beware the American cut which is 23 minutes shorter.

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I love this one it great.

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One Naked Night (1965) Woman's Noir Vérité

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New York Artist-Photographer's Model Woman's Noir

Directed  filmed and probably written (though there is no credit) by Al Viola, (Albert T. Viola born in Brooklyn) a production coordinator for The Naked City TV series (1958-1963), who segued into film, other credits include a "Mondo" film A Fool's World (1964), a thriller called A Woman in Love (1968) it's IMDb page shows zero reviews, Interplay (1970) ditto, and a pair of what sound like Dog Patch Hillbilly films titled Preacherman (1971) and Preacherman Meets Widderwoman (1973), but hey, he did make it to Hollywood. The cinematography is very noir-ish in spots.

A great bongo tune by Chet McIntyre (Music) plays during the credit sequence, and  the film has nice but appropriately sleazy piano/sax jazz instrumentals.

Right from the local Five and Dime stores sleazy pulp fiction paperback racks to the screen! One Naked Night is the story of a girl from "hicksville" it could even be the real one on Long Island. Candy Stevens (Barbara Morris, (Philip Marlowe TV Series (1959–1960 and a couple of other credits, she like thousands of other women trying to break into showbiz, didn't catch fire)) is a young woman, daughter of a high priced call girl, who made lots of money horizontally so that she could send her daughter to an expensive boarding school. Way to go mom! However, Candy is now alienated, desperate to leave her "home" town after she is exposed as the next of kin, a prostitutes daughter, when her notorious mother commits suicide and it's headlines in all the papers.


We get a nice voice over narration by Morris of our female character Candy. It's interesting because it's an average, real, plausible young woman's noir. She's not gonna be a female PI, the Femme Fatale, or an ace reporter, she's just telling the distaff side, the female equivalent of an average joe's hard boiled, a hard luck story, of what thousands of women who want to make it big go through, and just from the bios of our female cast you know that either they went through pretty similar circumstances and scenarios or know people who did. This will inform their best they can do acting.

This film is really just on the cusp of being an Exploitation Noir. It's not even up to contemporary "R" rated films of today. When the MPPC ended independent filmmakers exploited everything that they were prevented from depicting when the code was in effect. Its just like a dam broke and nothing was going to stop the flood of freedom no matter how crass and tasteless it was. If someone could make a quick buck off something they made it. But this film offers something more.

Barbara Morris is surprisingly good in this. Director Viola shows some nice sequences of 1965 5th Avenue, Times Square and its signage, an equally interesting detour into a Harlem dance hall and of a time long ago and far away. Worth a look. Viewed on online streaming site. 6.5/10

Full review with some screencaps here in Film Noir/Gangster pages and with all screencaps here: Noirsville

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The Unsuspected (1947) - Thriller from Warner Brothers and director Michael Curtiz. Victor Grandison (Claude Rains), the host of a very successful true-crime radio program, has been having a rough time lately. First his favorite niece Matilda (Joan Caulfield) was lost when her cruise ship sank, and then his personal secretary committed suicide is his home office. No sooner does a strange young man named Steve (Michael North) show up on Grandison's doorstep claiming to be Matilda's secret husband than Matilda herself shows up alive and unharmed, but with no memory of Steve. And as if that wasn't enough, evidence shows that Grandison's secretary was actually murdered. Also featuring Audrey Totter, Constance Bennett, Hurd Hatfield, Fred Clark, Harry Lewis, Jack Lambert, Ray Walker, Nana Bryant, Walter Baldwin, Douglas Kennedy, and Ross Ford.

The movie hits you with a lot of information and a lot characters at the beginning, and it takes a while to get things straight. The fact that most of the characters don't know what's going on, either, is enhanced and disorienting. Some performances are very good, like those from Rains, Totter, and Bennett as a snappy assistant (I could have seen her getting a supporting Oscar nod for it). However, Joan Caulfield and Michael (Ted) North are both terribly bland, and the film would have been improved with their replacement. There are several very nicely done shots, courtesy of director Curtis and cinematographer Elwood Bredell. I also liked the massive sets for the Grandison home, with 20-foot high ceilings and doorways the size of a warehouse's.   (7/10)

Source: TCM.

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17 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

The Unsuspected (1947) - Thriller from Warner Brothers and director Michael Curtiz. Victor Grandison (Claude Rains), the host of a very successful true-crime radio program, has been having a rough time lately. First his favorite niece Matilda (Joan Caulfield) was lost when her cruise ship sank, and then his personal secretary committed suicide is his home office. No sooner does a strange young man named Steve (Michael North) show up on Grandison's doorstep claiming to be Matilda's secret husband than Matilda herself shows up alive and unharmed, but with no memory of Steve. And as if that wasn't enough, evidence shows that Grandison's secretary was actually murdered. Also featuring Audrey Totter, Constance Bennett, Hurd Hatfield, Fred Clark, Harry Lewis, Jack Lambert, Ray Walker, Nana Bryant, Walter Baldwin, Douglas Kennedy, and Ross Ford.

The movie hits you with a lot of information and a lot characters at the beginning, and it takes a while to get things straight. The fact that most of the characters don't know what's going on, either, is enhanced and disorienting. Some performances are very good, like those from Rains, Totter, and Bennett as a snappy assistant (I could have seen her getting a supporting Oscar nod for it). However, Joan Caulfield and Michael (Ted) North are both terribly bland, and the film would have been improved with their replacement. There are several very nicely done shots, courtesy of director Curtis and cinematographer Elwood Bredell. I also liked the massive sets for the Grandison home, with 20-foot high ceilings and doorways the size of a warehouse's.   (7/10)

Source: TCM.

 

I'm glad that you liked this film.  I have it recorded as well.  I recorded it mainly for Claude Rains.  

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1 hour ago, LawrenceA said:

The Unsuspected (1947)

Source: TCM.

220px-The_Unsuspected_film_poster.jpg 

I'm a big fan of both Michael Curtiz and Claude Rains. The Unsuspected was, by my count, the last of nine films on which they collaborated, going back to Gold Is Where You Find It. They had some memorable moments together. It's been a while since I saw this one but I recall finding it a generally satisfying thriller, with some noteworthy moody black and white photography.

This would also be Rains's last film on his Warners contract, and his best years as an actor would, rather sadly, be largely behind him after this film.

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Thunder in the Night (1935)

A light hearted mystery melodrama from Fox, set in Budapest.

The "dead" husband of a countess makes a sudden unexpected return into his wife's life with the intention of blackmailing the lady as she is now married into aristocracy. He's enough of a cad that you know it's a matter of time before he winds up dead for real. It is then up to Captain of police Edmund Lowe to solve the crime.

The story and mystery content of this production are serviceable enough but hardly memorable. What makes this film enjoyable are its cast and the at times elegant visuals. Lowe was in his smooth dapper period when this film was made. He's not exactly an exciting actor but he is elegant and superficially charming here. Not only does he play the role of sleuth but he also feels comfortable dancing a slow waltz with a lady of refinement.

The supporting cast is above average, including Karen Morley as the countess, Paul Cavanagh as her aristocratic husband, Gene Lockhart as Lowe's corpulent assistant who never turned down a good meal, Una O'Connor as a chambermaid, Russell Hicks as the mustachioed pompous prefect of police, and Herman Bing, enjoyable as always, comically mangling the English language, this time as an excitable cab driver.

But the film further benefits from some extremely handsome sets, including cobblestone streets for a turn-of the-century feel, all lovingly photographed by Bert Glennon under George Archainbaud's direction. This atmospheric little film, while hardly outstanding, clearly qualifies an easy to take time waster.

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2.5 out of 4

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The Wistful Widow of Wagon Gap (1947) - Western comedy from Universal and director Charles Barton. Traveling salesmen Duke (Bud Abbott) and Chester (Lou Costello) get accused of murder in the small town of Wagon Gap, and their only reprieve from the hangman's rope is to become virtual indentured servants to the dead man's widow, Mrs. Hawkins (Marjorie Main). What seems like a nightmare sentence turns into all sorts of adventures as Chester gets named town sheriff. Also featuring Audrey Young, George Cleveland, Gordon Jones, William Ching, Peter Thompson, and Glenn Strange.

The gags are silly but I found myself laughing at many of them, regardless. the boys are starting to repeat themselves, as a gag with Lou being disturbed by a frog in his soup seems much like the cat-dinner gag in an earlier film. Main has fun with ornery yet love-seeking widow.   (7/10)

Source: Universal DVD.

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The Woman on the Beach (1947) - Dreadful melodrama from RKo and director Jean Renoir. Scott (Robert Ryan) is a member of the Coast Guard with PTSD and recurring nightmares. One day he meets Peggy (Joan Bennett) on the beach near his base. She's married to Tod (Charles Bickford), a famous painter who has gone blind. Peggy and Tod live in a small seaside cabin and do nothing all day, driving Peggy into the arms of Scott. This troubled love triangle leads to unrest and misery, mostly for the viewer. Also featuring Irene Ryan, Nan Leslie, Walter Sande, Glen Vernon, and Jay Norris.

Renoir is a French director whose works in that language I greatly admire. He came to the US during the war years and a made a handful of films, this being the last, before returning to Europe. That was a good call, because this was easily the worst film from him that I've seen. Poorly acted, badly directed, with an overheated screenplay and clumsy editing. It's so ham-fisted and over-the-top that it almost becomes a parody. Truly awful.   (4/10)

Source: TCM.

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Never seen it before but I had to STOP watching "Romeo and Juliet" (1936) on TCM.  Goodness suppose to be a movie not a camera set up on stage with actors overacting.  

To be or not to be...I'll choose the latter.

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Killer's Kiss (1955) Low Budget New York Noir

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Written, Directed, and Edited by Stanley Kubrick.

This is what you can do when you are low on budget, about $75,000, and big on talent.

What's not to like, you got a taxi dancer and a boxer, both of which are voyeurs of each other. A greasy, sleazy ballroom racketeer. And shots of New York City circa mid 1950's. The scenes of Times Square, a 1932 vintage IND R-1 subway car with the old crosswise and facing pattern rattan seats, the real Pennsylvania Station, a taxi dance ballroom, a boxing match in probably the old St.Nicholas Arena, DUMBO before it was DUMBO, and top it all off with a classic mannequin factory showdown. The film is priceless for these sequences alone.


Kubric is just at the beginning of an interesting run of films. For it's budget Killer's Kiss is a visual treat, a bit rough around the edges but thoroughly immersive and very entertaining. For a New Yorker the film is an archive of Times Square, Brooklyn and a bit of city life circa 1955. The ending at the mannequin factory is worth the view alone. A Low Budget Classic 8/10. Full review with more screencaps here in Film Noir/Gangster page. More screencaps in Noirsville

 

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11 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

The Woman on the Beach (1947) - Dreadful melodrama from RKo and director Jean Renoir.. This troubled love triangle leads to unrest and misery, mostly for the viewer. Also featuring Irene Ryan, Nan Leslie, Walter Sande, Glen Vernon, and Jay Norris.

Renoir is a French director whose works in that language I greatly admire. He came to the US during the war years and a made a handful of films, this being the last, before returning to Europe. That was a good call, because this was easily the worst film from him that I've seen. Poorly acted, badly directed, with an overheated screenplay and clumsy editing. It's so ham-fisted and over-the-top that it almost becomes a parody. Truly awful.   (4/10)

Source: TCM.

 

1. who does Granny Clampett play?

and

2. It has been quite a few years (7 or more), but I caught a goodly part of WOMAN ON THE BEACH on TCM and though it has been a while, I remember feeling very, very much as you do...although I don't "get" either RULES OF THE GAME or GRAND ILLUSION, I do, however, absolutely love THE SOUTHERNER which was one of his English-language triumphs. I don't think I realized RENOIR directed WOMAN ON THE BEACH until I imdb'd it because, yeah IT'S BAAAAAD....it almost seems like English was a second language for all involved...

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From what I've read RKO severely edited the film before release. (Whether that was good or bad, I dont know) Havent seen the film in a long time, but remember being disappointed, considering the cast and director. Would like to see it again to reevaluate it...

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Moss Rose (1947) - Period mystery-thriller from 20th Century Fox and director Gregory Ratoff. In turn-of-the-century London, showgirl Belle (Peggy Cummins) is horrified when her best friend and roommate is found murdered. Belle forces herself inside the case, trying to track down the mystery man whom she saw her roommate with the night if her death. Belle finds the man, a wealthy Canadian named Michael (Victor Mature). Belle accompanies Michael back to his family estate in order to solve the mystery, but Michael's disapproving mother (Ethel Barrymore) resents the girl's presence. Also featuring Vincent Price, Rhys Williams, Margo Woode, Patricia Medina, and George Zucco.

Cummins takes some getting used to with her hyper personality and high-pitched cockney accent. Mature is a sleepy-eyed oaf, but his lack of character is necessary for the story's suspense, I suppose. I liked seeing Vincent Price as a quick-witted Scotland Yard inspector. Ethel Barrymore has the most fun, though, and the less said about her here the better. This needs to be shown on TCM (it apparently never has) and in a quality print.   (7/10)

Source: YouTube, an awful copy, broken up into 8 clips.

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Scudda Hoo! Scudda Hay! (1948) - Technicolor rural drama from 20th Century Fox and director F. Hugh Herbert. Snug (Lon McCallister) is a young man working on the farm of his father (Henry Hull), but his hateful stepmother Judith (Anne Revere) and stepbrother Stretch (Robert Karnes) make things so unpleasant that Snug seeks work on the nearby farm of Roarer McGill (Tom Tully). Things get complicated when McGill buys two new mules that prove unmanageable, so Snug buys them and tries to train them himself. Snug also romances McGill's eldest daughter Rad (June Haver). Also featuring Walter Brennan, Natalie Wood, Edward Gargan, Geraldine Wall, and Marilyn Monroe.

This is a lot of hokey cornpone served in a (Techni)colorful package. McCallister and Haver are passable leads, while Revere and Tully are intensely unlikable. Natalie Wood is amusing as Haver's meddling little sister, Bean. I watched this for Marilyn Monroe, who can sort of be glimpsed exiting a church in one scene.  (6/10)

Source: YouTube.

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Adventures of Don Juan (1948) - Technicolor swashbuckling adventure and romance from Warner Brothers and director Vincent Sherman. Notorious ladies' man Don Juan de Marana (Errol Flynn) has grown weary of all the duels and womanizing, and he turns himself over to the mercy of the Spanish King Phillip III (Romney Brent). Don Juan takes a job as a fencing instructor, but he gets drawn into court intrigue, and a romance with the Queen (Viveca Lindfors). Also featuring Alan Hale, Robert Douglas, Robert Warwick, Ann Rutherford, Jerry Austin, Douglas Kennedy, Jean Shepherd, Fortunio Bonanova, Una O'Connor, Aubrey Mather, and Raymond Burr.

Flynn is looking a bit older, and his health (and his drinking) was reportedly in such a state that he had to use stunt doubles, and frequently delayed filming. He isn't bad here, but this is a long way from Robin Hood, despite the presence of old pal Alan Hale. The production design is very good, and the score is rousing, but the story meanders a bit and goes on a tad too long. I still enjoyed it, though. The movie won the Oscar for Best Color Costumes (Travilla, Leah Rhodes, and Marjorie Best), and it was nominated for Best Color Art Direction.    (7/10)

Source: TCM.

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11 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

Adventures of Don Juan (1948) - Technicolor swashbuckling adventure and romance from Warner Brothers and director Vincent Sherman. Notorious ladies' man Don Juan de Marana (Errol Flynn) has grown weary of all the duels and womanizing, and he turns himself over to the mercy of the Spanish King Phillip III (Romney Brent). Don Juan takes a job as a fencing instructor, but he gets drawn into court intrigue, and a romance with the Queen (Viveca Lindfors). Also featuring Alan Hale, Robert Douglas, Robert Warwick, Ann Rutherford, Jerry Austin, Douglas Kennedy, Jean Shepherd, Fortunio Bonanova, Una O'Connor, Aubrey Mather, and Raymond Burr.

Flynn is looking a bit older, and his health (and his drinking) was reportedly in such a state that he had to use stunt doubles, and frequently delayed filming. He isn't bad here, but this is a long way from Robin Hood, despite the presence of old pal Alan Hale. The production design is very good, and the score is rousing, but the story meanders a bit and goes on a tad too long. I still enjoyed it, though. The movie won the Oscar for Best Color Costumes (Travilla, Leah Rhodes, and Marjorie Best), and it was nominated for Best Color Art Direction.    (7/10)

Source: TCM.

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Max Steiner’s opening theme is fantastic, and demonstrated that he could write fanfares with the best of them [Korngold, Newman, for instance). Decades later, the theme was used again in “Zorro The Gay Blade.”

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45 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

Adventures of Don Juan (1948)

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I'm a big fan of Adventures of Don Juan. I agree about Steiner's marvelous score for this film, not just the rousing fanfare but its beautifully poignant love theme, as well.

I regard this as one of Errol Flynn's most satisfactory performances, whether looking older or not. The actor brings a world weary cynicism to the role of a legendary seducer who is getting weary of the chase. The actor may be better remembered for Robin Hood today but I think there's more subtlety to his playing here.

Flynn has a wonderful delivery of the dialogue in the witty, often tongue-in-cheek screenplay. But at the same time, his big scenes, whether the duel on the giant staircase (yes he's doubled but he still looks good and convincing in the action scenes) or his departure scene with the Queen (gloriously enhanced by Steiner's score), which is played in the grand manner, show why, even at this later stage of his career, he is still ranked as king of the swashbucklers.

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4 minutes ago, TomJH said:

Flynn has a wonderful delivery of the dialogue in the witty, often tongue-in-cheek screenplay. But at the same time, his big scenes, whether the duel on the giant staircase (yes he's doubled but he still looks good and convincing in the action scenes) or his departure scene with the Queen (gloriously enhanced by Steiner's score), which is played in the grand manner, show why, even at this later stage of his career, he is still ranked as king of the swashbucklers.

Flynn's sword-fighting scenes in prior movies are the action equivalent of Fred Astaire's dancing: he's so good at it, he makes it look easy. They're fun, energetic, and exciting, but there's never any mystery as to who's coming out on top. 

The same is true in a narrative sense in Don Juan, but whether it was Flynn's age or health or if it was from Sherman's direction or the fight coordinator's idea, he looks like he's really fighting, with an intensity to his expression that makes the viewer wonder if he's going to survive the final staircase confrontation. I thought it one of the best of its sort.

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On 6/11/2018 at 8:32 PM, TomJH said:

I'm a big fan of both Michael Curtiz and Claude Rains. The Unsuspected was, by my count, the last of nine films on which they collaborated, going back to Gold Is Where You Find It. They had some memorable moments together. It's been a while since I saw this one but I recall finding it a generally satisfying thriller, with some noteworthy moody black and white photography.

This would also be Rains's last film on his Warners contract, and his best years as an actor would, rather sadly, be largely behind him after this film.

I enjoyed Claude Rains in this a great deal.  No surprise.  I love finding these that I've still never seen.  Quite a treat.

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17 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

Flynn's sword-fighting scenes in prior movies are the action equivalent of Fred Astaire's dancing: he's so good at it, he makes it look easy. They're fun, energetic, and exciting, but there's never any mystery as to who's coming out on top. 

The same is true in a narrative sense in Don Juan, but whether it was Flynn's age or health or if it was from Sherman's direction or the fight coordinator's idea, he looks like he's really fighting, with an intensity to his expression that makes the viewer wonder if he's going to survive the final staircase confrontation. I thought it one of the best of its sort.

That's a good point about the intensity of Flynn's expression while fighting in Don Juan, Lawrence, clearly adding to the dramatic impact of the final duel. Earlier, during a sequence in which Flynn rescues a character from a torture chamber, at one point the actor sounds slightly out of breath in delivering a bit of dialogue. It, too, adds to the effectiveness of the moment, in my opinion. He's no longer the superman of Robin Hood.

Flynn's chain smoking would lead to his lungs largely being shot. Apparently he was quickly out of breath during the filming of the action scenes for Don Juan which is why no single shot of him in action lasts much more than a few seconds. Still, the action scenes are beautifully edited and the overall effect still impressive.

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22 hours ago, hamradio said:

Never seen it before but I had to STOP watching "Romeo and Juliet" (1936) on TCM.  Goodness suppose to be a movie not a camera set up on stage with actors overacting.  

To be or not to be...I'll choose the latter.

After Basil Rathbone as Tybalt was killed, the film had no interest for me.  I found Norma Shearer especially cloying, and I like her in most movies.  Apparently, Rathbone had just played Romeo with Katherine Cornell on stage, to excellent reviews.  While he also was too old for the part, I think he would have given it more sex appeal than Howard.

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Against the Wind (1948) - British wartime espionage tale from Ealing Studios and director Charles Crichton. A motley assortment of recruits are trained by the British secret service in various espionage techniques before being sent behind enemy lines into occupied Belgium. There they must execute a perilous mission to rescue an important prisoner. Starring Robert Beatty, Simone Signoret, Jack Warner, Gordon Jackson, John Slater, Paul Dupuis, Gisele Preville, Peter Illing, Sybille Binder, James Robertson Justice, and Andre Morell.

This solid thriller is divided into two sections: the first half of the film tracks their training, with some interesting tidbits about dealing with blowing one's cover. This part of the movie also acts as a character builder, although that's the film's chief weakness: none of the protagonists are given much depth, and thus the later stakes are lessened a bit. The second half of the film is more lively, as they attempt to pull off their multi-part mission, with the usual "man (and woman) on a mission" trope that not all will make it out alive. I enjoy these types of films, so I may have rated it a bit higher than the average viewer would.   (7/10)

Source: TCM.

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10 hours ago, rosebette said:

re: 1936 ROMEO AND JULIET:

After Basil Rathbone as Tybalt was killed, the film had no interest for me.  I found Norma Shearer especially cloying, and I like her in most movies.  Apparently, Rathbone had just played Romeo with Katherine Cornell on stage, to excellent reviews.  While he also was too old for the part, I think he would have given it more sex appeal than Howard.

oh Hell to the yes.

I caught a very young Basil this morning in a precode he made with BILLIE DOVE and KAY FRANCIS (titled something like HER NOTORIOUS AFFAIR?)...he plays a moody violinist and it is ridiculous, but highly watchable...anyway, he was DEAD SEXY.

That nose is like something off a Greek bust.

ps- Norma Shearer really was a terrific actress, even if her style is a little antiquated...ROMEO AND JULIET is probably her worst performance- for a variety of reasons- but even if she'd been less "out there", she still 36 playing 15 and there was no enough Vaseline in the world at that time to make that work.

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10 hours ago, rosebette said:

Apparently, Rathbone had just played Romeo with Katherine Cornell on stage, to excellent reviews.  While he also was too old for the part, I think he would have given it more sex appeal than Howard.

That Broadway production also featured Brian Aherne, George Macready, Orson Welles, Edith Evans, Brenda Forbes, Moroni Olsen. Produced by Katherine Cornell and directed by her husband, Guthrie McClintic. Choreographed by Martha Graham.

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