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I Just Watched...

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14 hours ago, rosebette said:

After Basil Rathbone as Tybalt was killed, the film had no interest for me.  I found Norma Shearer especially cloying, and I like her in most movies.  Apparently, Rathbone had just played Romeo with Katherine Cornell on stage, to excellent reviews.  While he also was too old for the part, I think he would have given it more sex appeal than Howard.

It always amazes me at what spectacular athletic condition Rathbone was in when he had his famous duels on the screen in the mid to late '30s. He was born in 1892, making him a man in his mid to late '40s when he more than held his own against screen youngsters like Flynn (28 in Robin Hood) and Power (26 in Mark of Zorro).

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Albuquerque (1948) - Cinecolor western from Paramount Pictures and director Ray Enright. Cole Armin (Randolph Scott) arrives in the title town looking for work with his uncle John (George Cleveland). Cole quickly learns that his uncle is a crook with a stranglehold on the town, so the newcomer instead sides with brother-and-sister competitors Ted (Russell Hayden) and Celia Wallace (Catherine Craig). This puts Cole at odds with John, and the whole town may erupt in war. Also featuring George "Gabby" Hayes, Barbara Britton, Lon Chaney Jr., Irving Bacon, Russell Simpson, and Karolyn Grimes.

This is another forgettable, corny western with little to differentiate it from many others. Chaney, as a vicious henchman, seems like he may be a highlight, but he isn't given a lot to do after the film's first act, and an eventual one-on-one fight with Scott is undercut by silly, comedic music on the score. Hayes is amusing, if you find his kind of shtick amusing, and he's in almost as many scenes as Scott is. Some scenes with a movie-cute kid are grating.   (5/10)

Source: Universal DVD.

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10 hours ago, TomJH said:

It always amazes me at what spectacular athletic condition Rathbone was in when he had his famous duels on the screen in the mid to late '30s. He was born in 1892, making him a man in his mid to late '40s when he more than held his own against screen youngsters like Flynn (28 in Robin Hood) and Power (26 in Mark of Zorro).

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That's what happens when you don't marinate yourself in booze and take care of your body.  Watch Basil in The Court Jester with Danny Kaye.  He's in his 60s in that one and still able to manage a sword fight with a much younger man.

 

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Scenes from the Class Struggle in Beverly Hills (1989) From the director of Eating Raoul, Paul Bartel - The widow's houseboy and the divorcee's chauffeur bet on which will bed the other's employer first. Along with other shenanigans 7/10

Scenes from the Class Struggle in Beverly Hills Poster

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Anna Karenina (1948) - Literary melodrama from London Films and director Julien Duvivier. Vivien Leigh stars as the title character, an unhappily married woman in late 19th century Russia. She begins an affair with the handsome young Count Vronsky (Kieron Moore), causing her disgraced husband (Ralph Richardson) to seek a divorce and sole custody of their son. This leads Anna down a path of heartbreak and misery. Also featuring Martita Hunt, Hugh Dempster, Mary Kerridge, Marie Lohr, Frank Tickle, Sally Ann Howes, Niall MacGinnis, Michael Gough, Heather Thatcher, and Heather Haye.

The costumes are nice, and director Duvivier does a lot of visually interesting things with the lighting, but I still can't bring myself to care about any of these characters, no matter how many versions of this that I see. The performances are fine, I suppose, although Moore is dull as dishwater. I do like this one line of dialogue late in the story: "Why not turn out the lights when there's nothing left to see?" That's a question I ask myself on a near-daily basis, but then I see my stacks of movies and have my answer.   (6/10)

Source: FilmStruck. Strangely, as much as they taut fidelity to the filmmakers' vision with restored and remastered editions, the available copy of this is the cut version running 111 minutes. The full version runs 139 minutes.

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Another Part of the Forest (1948) - Southern melodrama from Universal and director Michael Gordon. In a small Alabama town, general store owner Marcus Hubbard (Fredric March) is despised by the townsfolk and most of his family as well. His two sons Ben (Edmond O'Brien) and Oscar (Dan Duryea) and daughter Regina (Ann Blyth) are all scheming to get their father's money, while their mother Lavinia (Florence Eldridge) is slowly losing her mind from guilt over her husband's past misdeeds. They all attack each other as things unravel toward a final confrontation. Also featuring John Dall, Dona Drake, Betsy Blair, Fritz Leiber, Don Beddoe, and Whit Bissell.

This is based on the lesser known prequel play to The Little Foxes, both from writer Lillian Hellman. This isn't as memorable as that earlier film, mainly due to pedestrian direction, but this one is well worth a look for the performances. Duryea is exceptionally weaselly, O'Brien calls out everyone's shortcomings and hypocrisies, and March makes for a great SOB. I also liked Betsy Blair's small role as the younger version of the role played by Patricia Collinge in the other film. Ann Blyth, playing the younger version of Bette Davis, acquits herself well.   (7/10)

Source: TCM.

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I watched most, but did not get to see all, of two films that have several things in common, although Desk Set is a comedy and No Down Payment is a domestic melodrama. Both are from the late 1950s and are interesting time capsules for the attitudes of the period; both have some fine actors; and both suffer from pedestrian direction (Walter Lang in Desk Set, Martin Ritt in No Down Payment). Desk Set is virtually a filmed play, although the sets, the costumes, and the color cinematography of Leon Shamroy all help out. Ritt is still a beginner, and will soon be doing much better, but I couldn't help wondering what Douglas Sirk (or Delmer Daves or many another director) could have done with this story and these characters.

I would never have imagined Katharine Hepburn playing a character called Bunny, but so she does. Her vocal mannerisms are in overdrive, such as the sentence interrupted by a twittering hahaha, and if you were going to do a nightclub imitation of Hepburn, this would be the film to study. Perhaps a stronger director would have helped her edit her performance. In addition to Hepburn and Spencer Tracy, there's Gig Young playing his specialty, the attractive wolfish guy who's actually kind of sleazy; Joan Blondell providing jolts of energy whenever she's own screen; and Dina Merrill, aristocratic and lovely. It would be easy to write an article on the assumptions about male/female relationships and the office behavior shown in the film.

No Down Payment is said to have suggested Knots Landing, for it's about suburban neighbors, four couples in this case. I enjoyed seeing some of the location shots of street scenes from the LA area. Cameron Mitchell and Joanne Woodward are from the South, which means in 1950s dramas that they automatically have the right to be mean, neurotic, trashy, pathetic, or some combination of the same. Pat Hingle is younger, thinner, and better-looking than he will be in only a few years, and is a plausible husband for the lovely Barbara Rush, who is perfectly cast as a wife of the late 1950s/early 1960s, whether upper crust (The Young Philadelphians) or middle class (Bigger Than Life). Jeffrey Hunter (very attractive) and Patricia Owens are the newcomers, the young innocents. Sheree North and Tony Randall are cast against type; North was at one time groomed to be a replacement for Marilyn Monroe, but here she's playing a not too sexy long-suffering wife. Tony Randall is her alcoholic husband, a womanizer and a dreamer who's convinced that tomorrow he'll come up with a surefire million-dollar scheme, and Randall does a good job of making this man believable.

 

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Dr. Caligari (1989)

Dr. Caligari Poster

Weird experimental, art house, trashy. 5/10 

 

 

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Arch of Triumph (1948) - Wartime romantic drama from United Artists and director Lewis Milestone. In Paris on the eve of WW2, Austrian refugee Dr. Ravic (Charles Boyer) meets troubled actress Joan Madou (Ingrid Bergman), and the two begin a tumultuous relationship. Meanwhile, Ravic believes that he's spotted Nazi torturer Ivon Haake (Charles Laughton) in the city, and he wants revenge. Also featuring Louis Calhern, Ruth Warrick, Roman Bohnen, J. Edward Bromberg, Ruth Nelson, Stephen Bekassy, Curt Bois, Art Smith, Feodor Chaliapin, Byron Foulger, Irene Ryan, Gene Roth, and William Conrad.

This adaptation of a novel by Erich Maria Remarque was a very expensive flop. It's overlong and frequently dull, although the performances are all good. I especially liked Calhern as an ex-pat Russian. This was later remade for TV with Anthony Hopkins, Lesley-Anne Down, and Donald Pleasence in the leads. I saw that version several years ago, and liked it less.   (6/10)

Source: YouTube.

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Berlin Express (1948) - Postwar intrigue and suspense from RKO and director Jacques Tourneur. The shattered landscape of post-WW2 Frankfurt provides the backdrop as an international group of agents and specialists search for a missing man of import who has been kidnapped by the surviving Nazi underground. Starring Robert Ryan, Merle Oberon, Paul Lukas, Charles Korvin, Robert Coote, Roman Toporow, Reinhold Schunzel, Peter von Zerneck, Otto Waldis, Fritz Kortner, Michael Harvey, Gene Evans, and Charles McGraw.

This was one of the better of the post-war thrillers that I've seen. The desolate cityscape provides an atmospheric backdrop for this tale of uncertain loyalties and secret agendas. The cast is serviceable, although no one really stands out. The narration by Paul Stewart lends a docudrama feel to things. There's some terrific moody cinematography by Lucien Ballard.   (7/10)

Source: TCM.

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Lawrence, I love that photo of Bergman and Boyer that you posted. Ingrid really looks sexy in that picture.

 

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Brighton Rock (1948) - Vicious British crime drama from Pathe and director and producer John & Roy Boulting. Set in a time before WW2, the story follows the murderous path of street thug Pinkie Brown (Richard Attenborough). After killing one man, he tries to cover his tracks by marrying a potential witness, young waitress Rose (Carol Marsh), while threatening others. Amateur sleuth Ida (Hermione Baddeley) is also out to find the killer and prove an annoyance to Pinkie. Also featuring William Hartnell, Harcourt Williams, Wylie Watson, Nigel Stock, Virginia Winter, Reginald Purdell, George Carney, Alan Wheatley, and Charles Goldner.

The violence is a bit shocking for its day, and the mood is relentlessly grim whenever Pinkie is on screen. The camera work and art direction help set the environment of squalor and desperation. Attenborough is very good, as is Baddeley. This was a huge, controversial hit in the UK, but barely made a ripple here (under the silly new title of Young Scarface). In the decades since, its reputation has only grown, and it's generally considered one of the best British films, and a seminal crime film.   (8/10)

Source: TCM.

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Canon City (1948) - "B"-movie prison break docudrama from Eagle-Lion and director Crane Wilbur. The story details a factual prison break from a Colorado penitentiary, showing their methods  of escape and their various failures on the outside that lead to their quick recapture, or worse. Featuring Scott Brady, Stanley Clements, Jeff Corey, Whit Bissell, Henry Brandon, Charles Russell, DeForest Kelley, Ralph Byrd, John Doucette, and Warden Roy Best as himself.

There are some stylish touches here and there, and the Reed Hadley-narrated docudrama aspects are amusing, but a lot of amateurish acting and corny dialogue keep this from being truly memorable. (6/10)

Source: TCM.

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The Mercy (2018):  I'm not a boat person, and I knew nothing about Donald Crowhurst and his ill-fated attempt to sail around the world alone in the late 60's..that doesn't matter at all in viewing this account of his (evidently famous) last voyage.  Colin Firth plays Crowhurst, an amateur sailor who knows he really doesn't have the skill to enter this Times' sponsored contest to break an old record..but to promote a navigational gadget he invented, and at the urging of a pr man he hired (David Thewles), he risks everything he owns and sets sail.  The newspapers play it up big..he' is the 'everyman' out to take on the pro's, but what they do not report is the truth..that his voyage is not going well, and he and the press are lying about his progress.  The first part of the film is the set-up to the trip..we see Firth as a devoted husband to Rachel Weisz and their children (3 in the film..evidently he actually had 4), he is driven to market his invention, and he can't admit to failure once he begins. The buildup he's given by his local townsmen makes it impossible for him to back out, even though he seemed doomed from the start as neither he, nor his boat, were ready for such a strenuous voyage.  Most of the 'sea' filming is interspersed with scenes of his family, or backers..and this is kind of a problem: we really aren't allowed enough time to 'feel' what he's going through, and if Firth weren't such a good actor, it would be totally lost.  The 'sea' does not become the character it needs to be..there is much talk about how loud the wind is, yet we don't hear it..in fact, there is one very long silent section when wind, or waves lapping would have been so effectual.  We can see in his face and demeanor that Firth is losing it, but there are so many back and forth cuts, we're not in on the downward slide; the camera never really gives us the sense of claustrophobia someone must feel after months in a small cabin, or the vastness of the sea outside. His dispair over engine trouble or loss of communications could've been wonderfully tense scenes, but were only snippets. Over all, I give Firth  high marks for a really fine performance, and although she doesn't really have much of a challenge, Weisz is fine (especially in a scene calling out the press), but what could've been more powerful is tarnished by so-so direction.  Less back story, and more 'man alone at sea' would have at least added some needed drama. It's a little better than average, but only because of the actors' work, and I would consider it a must see only for Firth fans.  source: terrarium       Related image

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On 6/6/2018 at 5:39 PM, TomJH said:

I wouldn't really call Lilacs in the Spring a little treasure, rosebette, certainly not with its clunky first half. But Flynn has a few moments in the second half of the film that work to a degree, including when he sings Lily of Laguna on the stage (even if he isn't a natural at song and dance).

I purchased this DVD of the film off amazon. As a Flynn fan I'm glad I got it.

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On 6/6/2018 at 5:39 PM, TomJH said:

I wouldn't really call Lilacs in the Spring a little treasure, rosebette, certainly not with its clunky first half. But Flynn has a few moments in the second half of the film that work to a degree, including when he sings Lily of Laguna on the stage (even if he isn't a natural at song and dance).

I purchased this DVD of the film off amazon. As a Flynn fan I'm glad I got it.

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I finally had a chance to view my newly purchased copy of this one.  While not a great film it's the source of many pleasures.  I had never seen an Anna Neagle film before, and I can see why she was a top star in England.  She was incredibly talented, and I was rather shocked to find out that this woman who played her own daughter and danced like a sprite was 50.  Flynn was excellent, charming, delightful, and later more than a bit melancholy underneath that dapper exterior.  I also enjoyed the in-joke about Burma.  

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6 hours ago, rosebette said:

 

I finally had a chance to view my newly purchased copy of this one.  While not a great film it's the source of many pleasures.  I had never seen an Anna Neagle film before, and I can see why she was a top star in England.  She was incredibly talented, and I was rather shocked to find out that this woman who played her own daughter and danced like a sprite was 50.  Flynn was excellent, charming, delightful, and later more than a bit melancholy underneath that dapper exterior.  I also enjoyed the in-joke about Burma.  

Glad you enjoyed the film, uneven as it may be, rosebette. I think Flynn makes it worth the view, with a couple of scenes as highlights for him. Yes, he does bring a melancholy quality to his later scenes, and is rather touching at doing so, I thought.

People unfamiliar with Flynn films won't get the Burma in-joke, of course. But I'm sure that 1955 British audiences, who had been so upset with his film a decade before, got the reference.

Lilacs in the Spring (released as Let's Make Up in America), while bombing in the U.S.,  did moderately good business at the British box office. Flynn and Neagle were reunited for a second old fashioned film, King's Rhapsody, shortly afterward. This film, too, is available on DVD, in a pretty good looking colour print. Alas, it's not a good film, unfortunately. Errol looks bloated and tired in it. His wife, Patrice Wymore, perhaps comes off best in the film in a "supporting" role in which she may actually have more screen time than Neagle.

If I remember correctly, Flynn was so dismissive of these films (including Lilacs) that he didn't even list their titles in his autobiography.

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On 6/12/2018 at 1:41 PM, LawrenceA said:

Moss Rose (1947) - Period mystery-thriller from 20th Century Fox and director Gregory Ratoff. In turn-of-the-century London, showgirl Belle (Peggy Cummins) is horrified when her best friend and roommate is found murdered. Belle forces herself inside the case, trying to track down the mystery man whom she saw her roommate with the night if her death. Belle finds the man, a wealthy Canadian named Michael (Victor Mature). Belle accompanies Michael back to his family estate in order to solve the mystery, but Michael's disapproving mother (Ethel Barrymore) resents the girl's presence. Also featuring Vincent Price, Rhys Williams, Margo Woode, Patricia Medina, and George Zucco.

Cummins takes some getting used to with her hyper personality and high-pitched cockney accent. Mature is a sleepy-eyed oaf, but his lack of character is necessary for the story's suspense, I suppose. I liked seeing Vincent Price as a quick-witted Scotland Yard inspector. Ethel Barrymore has the most fun, though, and the less said about her here the better. This needs to be shown on TCM (it apparently never has) and in a quality print.   (7/10)

Source: YouTube, an awful copy, broken up into 8 clips.

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This mystery-thriller has one of the great surprise endings of all time.

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On 6/5/2018 at 9:29 PM, LawrenceA said:

Dear Ruth (1947) - Mild but amusing comedy from Paramount Pictures and director William D. Russell. The film focuses on the upper middle-class family of Judge Harry Wilkins (Edward Arnold): wife Edie (Mary Philips), older daughter Ruth (Joan Caulfield), and younger daughter Miriam (Mona Freeman). When Army Air Corps. Lt. Bill Seacroft (William Holden) shows up on their doorstep, things are thrown into disarray. Bill thinks that he's been corresponding with Ruth, when in actuality it was 16-year-old Miriam. Ruth is engaged to marry the sensible Albert (Billy De Wolfe), but she agrees to pretend to be the girl of Bill's letters for the few short days that he has stateside before shipping out to the Pacific war theater. Of course, things get complicated for everyone. Also featuring Virginia Welles, Kevin O'Morrison, Marietta Canty, and Irving Bacon.

This is the kind of thing that disappeared from movie screens with the advent of television: simple, agreeable sitcom material. The cast all fill their roles well, with Freeman the standout for me. This was followed by a couple of sequels.    (7/10)

Source: TCM.

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Lively, inventive script by Norman Krasna, superb, lovable cast, I agree, this is the type of entertaining screen fare that we no longer see on the motion picture screen.  

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1 hour ago, TomJH said:

Glad you enjoyed the film, uneven as it may be, rosebette. I think Flynn makes it worth the view, with a couple of scenes as highlights for him. Yes, he does bring a melancholy quality to his later scenes, and is rather touching at doing so, I thought.

People unfamiliar with Flynn films won't get the Burma in-joke, of course. But I'm sure that 1955 British audiences, who had been so upset with his film a decade before, got the reference.

Lilacs in the Spring (released as Let's Make Up in America), while bombing in the U.S.,  did moderately good business at the British box office. Flynn and Neagle were reunited for a second old fashioned film, King's Rhapsody, shortly afterward. This film, too, is available on DVD, in a pretty good looking colour print. Alas, it's not a good film, unfortunately. Errol looks bloated and tired in it. His wife, Patrice Wymore, perhaps comes off best in the film in a "supporting" role in which she may actually have more screen time than Neagle.

If I remember correctly, Flynn was so dismissive of these films (including Lilacs) that he didn't even list their titles in his autobiography.

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I don't know if I want to see that one.  To see Flynn tired and old would only make me sad.  There is a lovely wistful quality in his performance in Lilacs.  I love how he goes from playing so-so music hall performer,lover, husband, and father.  He has a wonderful quiet presence, the essence of how less can be more in a performance.  Anna Neagle spoke very highly of him:  "I love naturalness and simplicity and Errol Flynn has this to a charming degree. He has made so many friends on this picture with his sense of fun and his conscientiousness and he has been enormously co-operative. It's so unfair to judge people by what you read or hear and I must confess I was not prepared to find him such a hard worker."

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24 minutes ago, rosebette said:

I don't know if I want to see that one.  To see Flynn tired and old would only make me sad.  There is a lovely wistful quality in his performance in Lilacs.  I love how he goes from playing so-so music hall performer,lover, husband, and father.  He has a wonderful quiet presence, the essence of how less can be more in a performance.  Anna Neagle spoke very highly of him:  "I love naturalness and simplicity and Errol Flynn has this to a charming degree. He has made so many friends on this picture with his sense of fun and his conscientiousness and he has been enormously co-operative. It's so unfair to judge people by what you read or hear and I must confess I was not prepared to find him such a hard worker."

Yes, there are definitely worthwhile moments to be found in Flynn's performance in Lilacs in the Spring. I particularly love that scene, brief as it is, when Errol gives a hint of becoming teary eyed when he thinks about his former wife on a Hollywood movie set. Wonderfully restrained, highly effective moment. As you say, rosebette, "the essence of how less can be more in a performance."

Herbert Wilcox, Neagle's husband and the film's producer, said, "Errol Flynn was an outrageous personality. (His) love of living defeated his ability as an artist."

Perhaps that was a nice way of commenting upon Errol's tired, unconvincing performance in King's Rhapsody. While he was apparently conscientious during the filming of Lilacs in the Spring, I'm under the impression that his drinking may have taken over while filming Rhapsody (which has a poor screenplay to begin with) and it shows on the screen, I'm sorry to say.

Outside of the fact that King's Rhapsody has nice colour, along with impressive costumes and sets, I can't think of much to say in favour of this slow, dull film. It's definitely one of Flynn's weakest, most forgettable films.

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2 hours ago, rosebette said:

I don't know if I want to see that one.  To see Flynn tired and old would only make me sad.  There is a lovely wistful quality in his performance in Lilacs.  I love how he goes from playing so-so music hall performer,lover, husband, and father.  He has a wonderful quiet presence, the essence of how less can be more in a performance.  Anna Neagle spoke very highly of him:  "I love naturalness and simplicity and Errol Flynn has this to a charming degree. He has made so many friends on this picture with his sense of fun and his conscientiousness and he has been enormously co-operative. It's so unfair to judge people by what you read or hear and I must confess I was not prepared to find him such a hard worker."

If you haven't seen it Crossed Swords, Flynn' second last swashbuckler filmed in Italy in 1953, is worth catching, rosebette. It was an attempt by Flynn to make another Don Juan-like tongue-in-cheek swashbuckler, with much of the film played for humour.

While the film clearly lacks the wit and finesse of Don Juan and its few action scenes are sometimes rushed, if you can find a nice print of it the film boasts beautiful colour (by Jack Cardiff) and some impressive Italian location shooting with real castles for backdrop. Flynn got himself into quite good physical condition for this production, and his duel at the end is surprisingly energetic. Yes, he's doubled in a couple of shots but, for the most part, Errol looks convincing in this duel. This sequence is without question the highlight of a very uneven film.

Appearances, by the way, are deceiving. Flynn may look relatively good in this film but, in fact, a doctor told him that his liver was deteriorating just before production began. The actor was nonchalant about this news.

Gina Lollobrigida is his leading lady and, curiously, in the DVD I got of the film, her voice is dubbed by another actress even though you can see that Gina is clearly speaking English. Most of the Italian cast is dubbed into English. It must have been something on the set of the film, with pretty well all the cast speaking Italian except Errol and Gina speaking English.

There have long been prints of dubious quality (and varying lengths) in circulation of this film. I got a very good looking copy from www.godzilla.com. I see it's on amazon now. Here's the cover:

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And here are a few screen snapshots from the DVD to give you an idea of its visuals:

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Crossed Swords is a far cry from Flynn in his prime, of course, but this is the last film released of Errol in which he was in decent physical condition. His duel at the end represents the final time we would see Flynn give a reasonably impressive physical demonstration. That cat like grace was still there, to a degree.

His next film production would be the disastrous incompleted William Tell in Italy. After that film went belly up Errol's drinking increased and we would see, unfortunately, a decidedly heavier actor in the remaining films in his career. By the time he filmed The Warriors two years later in England he looked much older than those two years.

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12 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Brighton Rock (1948) - Vicious British crime drama from Pathe and director and producer John & Roy Boulting. . In the decades since, its reputation has only grown, and it's generally considered one of the best British films, and a seminal crime film.   (8/10)

Source: TCM.

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1. That's a great poster

2. I didn't like the source novel for this movie at all, although I know it has its fans (aside from THE THIRD MAN, I;m not in to Grahame Greene at all.) I cannot recall for the life of me whether I have seen this movie or not, I know it was remade not too long ago with Helen Mirren and set in the 1960's...and I want to say I saw it pretty soon after reading and really, frankly, disliking the book- (sometimes we remember disliking something more vividly than really liking something.)

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"No Down Payment" - Martin Ritt

Unrelieved agony for four couples in a new housing development that promises a bright future for its' residents -

from beginning to end, it's a continual downhill slide -

joanne woodward and cameron mitchell - he hates his job and wants to be a police officer, she had a baby before they were married and had to give it up -

jeffrey hunter and patricia owens - she's an unhappy housewife and continually pushes her husband, he likes his computer tech job and doesn't want to go into sales -

barbara rush and pat hingle - she isn't happy with his lack of faith in God and he just wants to be left alone, they become involved with a Japanese family who want to reside in the development, she's in favor of the "restricted policy" and he is outraged by it -

tony randall and sheree north - she is very unhappy with her husband who seems to have a life of his own, he is a womanizer and an alcoholic and gets into trouble with his job -

everything comes to a head when cameron mitchell, who can't get into the police force because he lacks the right kind of education, gets very, very drunk and decides to rape patricia owens whose husband, Jeffrey Hunter, is out of town -

when Jeffrey Hunter gets home, of course, he goes wild -

cameron mitchell is accidentally killed -

and joanne woodward leaves the housing development in disgust -

the film is fairly well-directed by a young Martin Ritt and the cast is full of capable, arresting performances -

but, watching it, is like being drenched in unending painful disillusionment -

is this what it was like trying to achieve upward mobility in the late 50's? 

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12 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Brighton Rock (1948) - Vicious British crime drama from Pathe and director and producer John & Roy Boulting. Set in a time before WW2, the story follows the murderous path of street thug Pinkie Brown (Richard Attenborough). After killing one man, he tries to cover his tracks by marrying a potential witness, young waitress Rose (Carol Marsh), while threatening others. Amateur sleuth Ida (Hermione Baddeley) is also out to find the killer and prove an annoyance to Pinkie. Also featuring William Hartnell, Harcourt Williams, Wylie Watson, Nigel Stock, Virginia Winter, Reginald Purdell, George Carney, Alan Wheatley, and Charles Goldner.

The violence is a bit shocking for its day, and the mood is relentlessly grim whenever Pinkie is on screen. The camera work and art direction help set the environment of squalor and desperation. Attenborough is very good, as is Baddeley. This was a huge, controversial hit in the UK, but barely made a ripple here (under the silly new title of Young Scarface). In the decades since, its reputation has only grown, and it's generally considered one of the best British films, and a seminal crime film.   (8/10)

Source: TCM.

220px-Brighton_Rock.jpg

 

This one is good agree, One good British (UK) Noir that I've not seen (I probably have not seen quite a few) that I've heard recomendations for is The Blue Lamp (1950)

Here are the one's I've seen and liked that I can remember the titles for.

Brighton Rock (1948)

I Became a Criminal (1947)

The Fallen Idol (1948)

The Third Man (1949)

Odd Man Out (1947)

The Man Between (1953)

Terror on a Train (1953)

The Long Memory (1953)

Never Let Go (1960)

There was another one that took place up in Scotland I think, that was very similar in look to Hitchcock's The 39 Steps. It took place in a city then up in the moors then ends on top of a warehouse roof in a dockyards area. Can't remember it's name.

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in re: BRIT NOIR

Also kindasorta, NIGHT AND THE CITY. I know it was made by mostly Americans, BUT it is set deep in the grimy bowels oF London and it features Googie Withers, so it's at least a half-Brit

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