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I Just Watched...

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14 hours ago, jimmymac71 said:

Mister Buddwing. Could be two too many James Garner B&W films too close together. "Emily" was fine actually. Julie Andrews is amazing, even in B&W. Maybe I saw Dargo! Couldn't decide if to or too was right in both places. Don't tell CaveGirl.

I go nuts with nonlinear plot lines. Yeah, there is another word for that, on the tip of my tongue, but I'm too lazy go get a mirror and look at my tongue. If I was gonna take a name from a beer truck, "When You're Out Of Schlitz, You're Out Of Beer." Will TCM take that one out? I just noticed in Shop TCM it also included an airplane.

I have seen Mister Buddwing before, and like today, not from the very beginning. That happens plenty on my TV. Maybe I can watch it again, from the start, and it might make sense.

Was the girl on the beach, who cut his hair, Jean Simmons, and just not blonde?

I have seen Angela Lansbury play a role a little like that in Murder, She Wrote, her look alike cousin Emma McGill, but not with so much of her front showing. Did James Garner mind having his face in her chest?

It's a Neo noir. He's playing an amnesiac.  In fact Garner plays one of Film Noir’s touchstone tropes the amnesiac. The film opens with an unfocused shot of the sky sliced diced and fragmented by bare branches . As the frame focuses and our view pans we see the branches are trees, we see buildings, and Central Park at the corner of 59th and 5th. In an homage to Robert Montgomery‘s “The Lady In The Lake” and the beginning of “Dark Passage”, the film displays an intriguing POV sequence that begins when hands “rub” the eye of the camera, it also begins a faint jazz heartbeat increasing in tempo and volume as “we” the character sitting on a park bench search frantically through out suit pockets (for identification) combing out a train timetable, a scrap of paper with a phone number and some pills. A ring on his finger has an inscription “from G.V.”. The POV sequence continues until we stumble into a mirror at the Plaza Hotel when Garner is revealed. He has neither money or ID but he does remember the name of a woman, a woman named Grace.

All the three actresses that play Grace, Katherine Ross, Susanne Pleshette, and Jean Simmons are outstanding in their dual roles.

Watch for Joe Mantell’s cab driver character’s hilarious monologues then pay attention for its echo with the 2nd cab driver Billy Halop, the original leader of the Dead End Kids. Watch for Nichelle Nichols appearance as a dice player, Raymond St. Jacques as the tout for the crap game, and Jack Gilford‘s interaction with Garner in a lunch counter.


The cinematography during the crap game sequence is excellent, I don't recall a crap game segment, as well done for is length, taking time to visually introduce each of the participants. It does recall the boxing sequence and the ringside vignettes from Robert Wise's The Set Up (1949).

 

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Operation Pacific (1951) - WW2 submarine action from Warner Brothers and writer-director George Waggner. John Wayne stars as Lt. Cmdr. Duke Gifford, the first mate aboard a US Navy submarine fighting in the Pacific theater during World War 2. He and his fellow submariners brave depth charges and leaky hulls while battling Japanese forces.When they make it back to base, Duke tries to rekindle the flame with his ex-wife, Navy nurse Lt. Mary Stuart (Patricia Neal), but she's also seeing Navy airman Lt. Bob Perry (Philip Carey). Also featuring Ward Bond, Scott Forbes, Paul Picerni, Jack Pennick, William Campbell, Virginia Brissac, Kathryn Givney, Cliff Clark, Al Kikume, Richard Loo, Milburn Stone, and Martin Milner.

The submarine action is exciting and well-executed, with fine miniature work and editing. Things really bog down, though, when the plot moves back to base and the tired love triangle comes to the forefront. The opening scenes, involving the rescue of a group of nuns and small children, is very corny. All-in-all, I liked the movie well enough, and it's mostly what one would expect from a 50's John Wayne war movie.   (7/10)

Source: TCM.

(Laffite, wherever you are...this was #124)

926c935bfcfb8a4971d2063d1da03112.jpg

 

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Cigar Joe said of Mr Buddwing: the 2nd cab driver Billy Halop, the original leader of the Dead End Kids.

How interesting...a decade later Billy Halop played Munson, owner of Munson Cab Co on ALL IN THE FAMILY! Typecast?

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The Notorius Bettie Page (2005) Quasi Bio Noir

215px-Notorious_bettie_page.jpg

I used to ride the Ditmars Blvd Bus in Astoria, NY.

From the Ditmars - 31st. Street Station to 49th Street going to and from the city. I was just a baby about 3-4 years old. I loved riding the bus and the subways. We used to go shopping, places like Macy's, Gimbals, Bloomingdale's, or go to the movies. Once I watched a woman get on the bus carrying a hat box. She came  smiling down the aisle between the bench seats towards us. I was standing on my seat, and leaning forward over the top of the bench seat in front of me. She was noticeable even to me. She sat a few seats in front of us. She stayed on heading for Jackson Heights, and we got off. Years later I stumble upon a picture of Bettie Page, and I remember back to that day on the bus. Was it really Bettie, or am I wishfully fantasizing? I'll never know for sure or not, but it's a good story. That's part of her mystique.

Bettie (Mae) Page was a bonafide, raven haired, American Icon.

She was "The Dark Angel, The Queen of the Pinups."

Bettie was a very popular photographers model who established a significant profile in the 1950s for her pin-up photos, with a copious enough amount of content to achieve the title of "Queen of Pinups."

Directed by Mary Harron (I Shot Andy Warhol (1996), American Psycho (2000)). The screenplay was by Harron and Guinevere Turner (American Psycho (2000), the beautiful Black & White & Color cinematography was by W. Mott Hupfel III, and the music by Mark Suozzo (American Splendor (2003)).

The film stars Gretchen Mol (Get Carter (2000), 3:10 to Yuma (2007), Manchester by the Sea(2016)) as Bettie Page, Chris Bauer (Sweet and Lowdown (1999), The Deuce  TV Series (2017– )) as Irving Klaw, Lili Taylor (Mystic Pizza (1988), Born on the Fourth of July (1989), I Shot Andy Warhol (1996)) as Paula Klaw, Sarah Paulson (Serenity (2005), 12 Years a Slave(2013)) as Bunny Yeager, David Strathairn (Matewan (1987), The River Wild (1994), L.A. Confidential (1997), ) as Senator Estes Kefauver, Norman Reedus as Billy Neal, Kevin Carroll as Jerry Tibbs and Molly Moore as young Bettie.

The film selectively follows some parts of Bettie's life while significantly leaving out or inexplicably changing/rearranging other parts. That accounts for the "Quasi" in the header description.

The Notorious Bettie Page is told mostly in Black & White and in flashback, with the Florida sequences in bright paradisian color.

Gretchen Mol is great as Bettie Page though she should have by all accounts had more of a Tenneesee accent, Chris Bauer and Lili Taylor do a believeable job. The film ends with Bettie giving up modeling and turning to Jesus. The film is about a 7/10.

It was only the intermission....  the real story goes quite Noirsville.

More review with screencaps in Film Noir/Gangster pages.

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20 minutes ago, cigarjoe said:

The Notorius Bettie Page (2005) Quasi Bio Noir

215px-Notorious_bettie_page.jpg

I used to ride the Ditmars Blvd Bus in Astoria, NY.

From the Ditmars - 31st. Street Station to 49th Street going to and from the city. I was just a baby about 3-4 years old. I loved riding the bus and the subways. We used to go shopping, places like Macy's, Gimbals, Bloomingdale's, or go to the movies. Once I watched a woman get on the bus carrying a hat box. She came  smiling down the aisle between the bench seats towards us. I was standing on my seat, and leaning forward over the top of the bench seat in front of me. She was noticeable even to me. She sat a few seats in front of us. She stayed on heading for Jackson Heights, and we got off. Years later I stumble upon a picture of Bettie Page, and I remember back to that day on the bus. Was it really Bettie, or am I wishfully fantasizing? I'll never know for sure or not, but it's a good story. That's part of her mystique.

Bettie (Mae) Page was a bonafide, raven haired, American Icon.

She was "The Dark Angel, The Queen of the Pinups."

Bettie was a very popular photographers model who established a significant profile in the 1950s for her pin-up photos, with a copious enough amount of content to achieve the title of "Queen of Pinups."

Directed by Mary Harron (I Shot Andy Warhol (1996), American Psycho (2000)). The screenplay was by Harron and Guinevere Turner (American Psycho (2000), the beautiful Black & White & Color cinematography was by W. Mott Hupfel III, and the music by Mark Suozzo (American Splendor (2003)).

The film stars Gretchen Mol (Get Carter (2000), 3:10 to Yuma (2007), Manchester by the Sea(2016)) as Bettie Page, Chris Bauer (Sweet and Lowdown (1999), The Deuce  TV Series (2017– )) as Irving Klaw, Lili Taylor (Mystic Pizza (1988), Born on the Fourth of July (1989), I Shot Andy Warhol (1996)) as Paula Klaw, Sarah Paulson (Serenity (2005), 12 Years a Slave(2013)) as Bunny Yeager, David Strathairn (Matewan (1987), The River Wild (1994), L.A. Confidential (1997), ) as Senator Estes Kefauver, Norman Reedus as Billy Neal, Kevin Carroll as Jerry Tibbs and Molly Moore as young Bettie.

The film selectively follows some parts of Bettie's life while significantly leaving out or inexplicably changing/rearranging other parts. That accounts for the "Quasi" in the header description.

The Notorious Bettie Page is told mostly in Black & White and in flashback, with the Florida sequences in bright paradisian color.

Gretchen Mol is great as Bettie Page though she should have by all accounts had more of a Tenneesee accent, Chris Bauer and Lili Taylor do a believeable job. The film ends with Bettie giving up modeling and turning to Jesus. The film is about a 7/10.

It was only the intermission....  the real story goes quite Noirsville.

More review with screencaps in Film Noir/Gangster pages.

Cigarjoe, I've seen this about 5 times & it's well done (***-out of 4)

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(TRIVIA: the actual Bettie Page chose tin WESTWOOD, PARK  by the way

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Did you also include HBO's popular BOARDWALK EMPIRE?

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2 hours ago, spence said:

Did you also include HBO's popular BOARDWALK EMPIRE?

I haven't really watched it yet (its on my Netflix list), I saw maybe the first two episodes years ago, but yes I can easily edit her filmography on the main site to include it.

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Rawhide (1951) - Western suspense drama from 20th Century Fox and director Henry Hathaway. Wanted fugitive Rafe Zimmerman (Hugh Marlowe) and his gang take over a remote rest station named Rawhide. Their plan is to rob the next day's gold shipment, and they keep station worker Tom Owens (Tyrone Power) and unlucky traveler Vinnie Holt (Susan Hayward) and her infant daughter as hostages to see that things run smoothly. Tom and Vinnie know that they are as good as dead after the gold heist, so they try to formulate a plan of escape. Also featuring Edgar Buchanan, Jack Elam, Dean Jagger, George Tobias, Louis Jean Heydt, James Millican, Jeff Corey, Walter Sande, Kenneth Tobey, and Judy Ann Dunn.

This was a generally compelling western, a bit claustrophobic, but effective. The ending was surprising, which is a rarity for me. Hugh Marlowe as an intimidating, quick-with-his-fists bad guy was an unusual sight, and Jack Elam has one of his bigger roles.     (7/10)

Source: Encore Westerns

037a5b6ef3270cb9920e37e518671cd5.jpg

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4 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

The Notorius Bettie Page (2005) Quasi Bio Noir

215px-Notorious_bettie_page.jpg

I used to ride the Ditmars Blvd Bus in Astoria, NY.

From the Ditmars - 31st. Street Station to 49th Street going to and from the city. I was just a baby about 3-4 years old. I loved riding the bus and the subways. We used to go shopping, places like Macy's, Gimbals, Bloomingdale's, or go to the movies. Once I watched a woman get on the bus carrying a hat box. She came  smiling down the aisle between the bench seats towards us. I was standing on my seat, and leaning forward over the top of the bench seat in front of me. She was noticeable even to me. She sat a few seats in front of us. She stayed on heading for Jackson Heights, and we got off. Years later I stumble upon a picture of Bettie Page, and I remember back to that day on the bus. Was it really Bettie, or am I wishfully fantasizing? I'll never know for sure or not, but it's a good story. That's part of her mystique.

Bettie (Mae) Page was a bonafide, raven haired, American Icon.

She was "The Dark Angel, The Queen of the Pinups."

Bettie was a very popular photographers model who established a significant profile in the 1950s for her pin-up photos, with a copious enough amount of content to achieve the title of "Queen of Pinups."

Directed by Mary Harron (I Shot Andy Warhol (1996), American Psycho (2000)). The screenplay was by Harron and Guinevere Turner (American Psycho (2000), the beautiful Black & White & Color cinematography was by W. Mott Hupfel III, and the music by Mark Suozzo (American Splendor (2003)).

The film stars Gretchen Mol (Get Carter (2000), 3:10 to Yuma (2007), Manchester by the Sea(2016)) as Bettie Page, Chris Bauer (Sweet and Lowdown (1999), The Deuce  TV Series (2017– )) as Irving Klaw, Lili Taylor (Mystic Pizza (1988), Born on the Fourth of July (1989), I Shot Andy Warhol (1996)) as Paula Klaw, Sarah Paulson (Serenity (2005), 12 Years a Slave(2013)) as Bunny Yeager, David Strathairn (Matewan (1987), The River Wild (1994), L.A. Confidential (1997), ) as Senator Estes Kefauver, Norman Reedus as Billy Neal, Kevin Carroll as Jerry Tibbs and Molly Moore as young Bettie.

The film selectively follows some parts of Bettie's life while significantly leaving out or inexplicably changing/rearranging other parts. That accounts for the "Quasi" in the header description.

The Notorious Bettie Page is told mostly in Black & White and in flashback, with the Florida sequences in bright paradisian color.

Gretchen Mol is great as Bettie Page though she should have by all accounts had more of a Tenneesee accent, Chris Bauer and Lili Taylor do a believeable job. The film ends with Bettie giving up modeling and turning to Jesus. The film is about a 7/10.

It was only the intermission....  the real story goes quite Noirsville.

More review with screencaps in Film Noir/Gangster pages.

I like The Notorious Bettie Page (2005) as well.  If I remember correctly Bettie Page Reveals All (2012) has little bit about this movie in Page's own words.  I think I would call it a "Quasi" Documentary. ;)

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1 hour ago, Looney said:

I like The Notorious Bettie Page (2005) as well.  If I remember correctly Bettie Page Reveals All (2012) has little bit about this movie in Page's own words.  I think I would call it a "Quasi" Documentary. ;)

The Notorius Betty Page cuts out half her life.

 

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Royal Wedding (1951) - Technicolor musical romance from MGM and director Stanley Donen. Fred Astaire and Jane Powell star as brother-and-sister song-and-dance duo Tom and Ellen Bowen. When news of the impending royal wedding in London breaks, Tom and Ellen decide to take their show to that fair city. Ellen meets and falls for poor nobleman Lord John Brindale (Peter Lawford), while Tom meets and falls for local dancing girl Anne Ashmond (Sarah Churchill). Also featuring Keenan Wynn in a dual role, Albert Sharpe, Mae Clarke, and Viola Roache.

Often when watching these musicals lately, I'm torn on how to rate them. I really enjoy many of the musical numbers, but the the surrounding plot and dialogue are frequently pedestrian, and even occasionally woeful. Such is the case with this Astaire-Powell pairing. It features some of Fred's most iconic routines, including the "Sunday Jumps" work-out room solo number, and another solo bit, "You're All the World to Me", where he dances on the walls and the ceiling. However, the in-between sections involving either Astaire and Churchill or Powell and Lawford are just dull, unoriginal and not compelling. In the end, the musical numbers are why one watches these, so my rating is still slightly better than average. The song "Too Late Now" was nominated for the Oscar for Best Song.    (6/10)

Source: Mill Creek DVD.

500x500.jpg

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17 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

It's a Neo noir. He's playing an amnesiac.  In fact Garner plays one of Film Noir’s touchstone tropes the amnesiac. The film opens with an unfocused shot of the sky sliced diced and fragmented by bare branches . As the frame focuses and our view pans we see the branches are trees, we see buildings, and Central Park at the corner of 59th and 5th. In an homage to Robert Montgomery‘s “The Lady In The Lake” and the beginning of “Dark Passage”, the film displays an intriguing POV sequence that begins when hands “rub” the eye of the camera, it also begins a faint jazz heartbeat increasing in tempo and volume as “we” the character sitting on a park bench search frantically through out suit pockets (for identification) combing out a train timetable, a scrap of paper with a phone number and some pills. A ring on his finger has an inscription “from G.V.”. The POV sequence continues until we stumble into a mirror at the Plaza Hotel when Garner is revealed. He has neither money or ID but he does remember the name of a woman, a woman named Grace.

All the three actresses that play Grace, Katherine Ross, Susanne Pleshette, and Jean Simmons are outstanding in their dual roles.

Watch for Joe Mantell’s cab driver character’s hilarious monologues then pay attention for its echo with the 2nd cab driver Billy Halop, the original leader of the Dead End Kids. Watch for Nichelle Nichols appearance as a dice player, Raymond St. Jacques as the tout for the crap game, and Jack Gilford‘s interaction with Garner in a lunch counter.


The cinematography during the crap game sequence is excellent, I don't recall a crap game segment, as well done for is length, taking time to visually introduce each of the participants. It does recall the boxing sequence and the ringside vignettes from Robert Wise's The Set Up (1949).

 

Lovely write-up, CigarJoe! I watched this film too yesterday and though I'd seen it before had actually forgotten what happened so was able to suspend belief till the end. Noticed all the great appearances of actors in small parts you mention and they all add to the movie's cache. I recall this film being touted even though it is not widely known and it does deserve acclaim. Garner is quite good in the role as are all his women co-stars. Naming oneself after a beer truck though, always causes problems some say...

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52 minutes ago, CaveGirl said:

Lovely write-up, CigarJoe! I watched this film too yesterday and though I'd seen it before had actually forgotten what happened so was able to suspend belief till the end. Noticed all the great appearances of actors in small parts you mention and they all add to the movie's cache. I recall this film being touted even though it is not widely known and it does deserve acclaim. Garner is quite good in the role as are all his women co-stars. Naming oneself after a beer truck though, always causes problems some say...

It's also got a great jazz score by Kenyon Hopkins

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8 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

The Notorius Bettie Page (2005) Quasi Bio Noir

215px-Notorious_bettie_page.jpg

I used to ride the Ditmars Blvd Bus in Astoria, NY.

From the Ditmars - 31st. Street Station to 49th Street going to and from the city. I was just a baby about 3-4 years old. I loved riding the bus and the subways. We used to go shopping, places like Macy's, Gimbals, Bloomingdale's, or go to the movies. Once I watched a woman get on the bus carrying a hat box. She came  smiling down the aisle between the bench seats towards us. I was standing on my seat, and leaning forward over the top of the bench seat in front of me. She was noticeable even to me. She sat a few seats in front of us. She stayed on heading for Jackson Heights, and we got off. Years later I stumble upon a picture of Bettie Page, and I remember back to that day on the bus. Was it really Bettie, or am I wishfully fantasizing? I'll never know for sure or not, but it's a good story. That's part of her mystique.

Bettie (Mae) Page was a bonafide, raven haired, American Icon.

She was "The Dark Angel, The Queen of the Pinups."

Bettie was a very popular photographers model who established a significant profile in the 1950s for her pin-up photos, with a copious enough amount of content to achieve the title of "Queen of Pinups."

Directed by Mary Harron (I Shot Andy Warhol (1996), American Psycho (2000)). The screenplay was by Harron and Guinevere Turner (American Psycho (2000), the beautiful Black & White & Color cinematography was by W. Mott Hupfel III, and the music by Mark Suozzo (American Splendor (2003)).

The film stars Gretchen Mol (Get Carter (2000), 3:10 to Yuma (2007), Manchester by the Sea(2016)) as Bettie Page, Chris Bauer (Sweet and Lowdown (1999), The Deuce  TV Series (2017– )) as Irving Klaw, Lili Taylor (Mystic Pizza (1988), Born on the Fourth of July (1989), I Shot Andy Warhol (1996)) as Paula Klaw, Sarah Paulson (Serenity (2005), 12 Years a Slave(2013)) as Bunny Yeager, David Strathairn (Matewan (1987), The River Wild (1994), L.A. Confidential (1997), ) as Senator Estes Kefauver, Norman Reedus as Billy Neal, Kevin Carroll as Jerry Tibbs and Molly Moore as young Bettie.

The film selectively follows some parts of Bettie's life while significantly leaving out or inexplicably changing/rearranging other parts. That accounts for the "Quasi" in the header description.

The Notorious Bettie Page is told mostly in Black & White and in flashback, with the Florida sequences in bright paradisian color.

Gretchen Mol is great as Bettie Page though she should have by all accounts had more of a Tenneesee accent, Chris Bauer and Lili Taylor do a believeable job. The film ends with Bettie giving up modeling and turning to Jesus. The film is about a 7/10.

It was only the intermission....  the real story goes quite Noirsville.

More review with screencaps in Film Noir/Gangster pages.

I've seen that movie with Gretchen and it's not bad. Bettie's association with Irving Claw is also an interesting story plus her time posing for that female pin-up photographer, Bunny Yeager. I believe Bettie is also found posing in the Harold Lloyd book in have in 3-D. I hope you really saw her and did she have a kind of deep voice, since one of those documentaries about her with her narration, sounds very deep and sultry. I just got a book catalogue advertising a book called "The Little Book of Bettie" with 216 pages, by Running Press for $12.95.

My most cherished Bettie collectible is an album with her on the cover wearing a leopard skin outfit. She's so cute even when she is threatening men with whips! It's called "The Best Musical Comedy Songs" oddly and can be found on this site:

http://www.grayflannelsuit.net/blog/four-classic-bettie-page-album-covers-two-old-two-new

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In documentary, Bettie Page Reaveals All she in her late 70s or early 80s of course sounds like Granny Clampet

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Sealed Cargo (1951) - WW2 thriller from RKO and director Alfred Werker. Massachusetts fishing boat captain Pat Bannon (Dana Andrews) and his crew come across a derelict Danish sailing ship in the North Atlantic. The only person on board is the ship's captain Skalder (Claude Rains). He claims that a German u-boat attacked his ship in rough weather, and that the rest of his crew were either killed or abandoned ship. Bannon agrees to tow Skalder's boat back to port, but is there more to his story than he's letting on? Also featuring Carla Balenda, Philip Dorn, Onslow Stevens, Skip Homeier, Arthur Shields, Morgan Farley, Eric Feldary, J.M. Kerrigan, Steve Forrest, and Whit Bissell.

This is an entertaining wartime suspense film, with the first half playing like a whodunit mystery as Bannon (and the audience) tries to figure out what's really going on and who is on whose side. The second half is a well-executed thriller as those in the know try to evade detection and solve their new-found problems before it's too late. I'm being purposely vague, as the revelations are a big part of the movie's appeal. The cast is good, with the standout for me being Philip Dorn as a suspicious new crew member on Bannon's ship. This movie also marked the only time real-life brothers Dana Andrews and Steve Forrest appeared together.   (7/10)

Source: TCM.

sealed_cargo-369208959-large.jpg

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I watched IM GONNA GIT YOU SUCKA (1987) On TCM ON Demand. 

Genuinely one of the funniest films of the 1980s; this time I was quite struck by how good acting is from the ensemble- all the Wayanses, John Vernon, Antonio Fargas, J'anet Dubious, Jim Brown-if everyone in the cast was not at the top of their game, this film would not have worked, funny as the script is.

I adore every frame of this movie and I think I laughed out loud about 50 times in spite of the fact that I've seen it a dozen times

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(The adorable curly haired little blond boy reading the story of Abraham Lincoln tickled me especially this time, I had to pause the TV so I could stop howling with laughter)

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HOLLYWOOD SHUFFLE from the same year (1987) is just about as funny and needs to be on TCM.  Some of the humor is dated as acting opportunities for minorities have improved some but a lot of it still holds true.

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35 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I watched IM GONNA GIT YOU SUCKA (1987) On TCM ON Demand. 

Genuinely one of the funniest films of the 1980s; this time I was quite struck by how good acting is from the ensemble- all the Wayanses, John Vernon, Antonio Fargas, J'anet Dubious, Jim Brown-if everyone in the cast was not at the top of their game, this film would not have worked, funny as the script is.

I adore every frame of this movie and I think I laughed out loud about 50 times in spite of the fact that I've seen it a dozen times

I still wanna know how that guy went to the bathroom wearing all that s***.

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Show Boat (1951) - Technicolor musical, the third adaptation of the hit stage musical based on the Edna Ferber novel, from MGM and director George Sidney. Set in the late 19th century on the Mississippi river, the story follows the various romances and dramas surrounding the performers on the title conveyance, which traveled up and down the river putting on song-and-dance shows. Magnolia Hawks (Kathryn Grayson) is the daughter of the boat owners, and she falls in love with their newest actor, former gambler Gaylord Ravenal (Howard Keel). Meanwhile, leading lady Julie LaVerne (Ava Gardner) sees her fortunes fade after a secret about her past is revealed. Also featuring Joe E. Brown, Agnes Moorehead, Marge & Gower Champion, Robert Sterling, Leif Erickson, William Warfield, Adele Jergens, Linda Christian, Joyce Jameson, and Regis Toomey.

I haven't seen the 1929 version, but I watched the 1936 version many years ago and liked it well enough. This version wasn't as good in my opinion, but it's not without its merits. The production values are top tier. Some of the song renditions are nice, and Gardner isn't bad as the trainwreck Julie. I missed the presence of Paul Robeson, though. It was a big hit, and the most commercially successful version of the property. The movie earned two Oscar nominations, for Best Color Cinematography (Charles Rosher) and Best Score (Adolph Deutsch & Conrad Salinger).   (6/10)

Source: Warner DVD. This was part of the TCM Greatest Classic Films Collection: Broadway Musicals set. Like most of these TCM sets, it's really just a repackaging of the various individual disc releases from earlier. I'm not sure when Warner first released Show Boat on DVD, but it is sorely in need of a restoration. The colors are fading, distorted and bleeding, and there's a lot of digital "noise" that pops up throughout the running time. 

show-boat.jpg

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38 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

Show Boat (1951)

 

show-boat.jpg

I can't say that I'm a huge fan of this film, though it does have great production values and one of my favourite musical numbers, "Let's Make Believe."

The film also has one of those wondrous magical moments in its final seconds. The music is swelling and we see the young lovers embrace on the show boat as it pulls away. But the moment that I look for is when Ava Gardner as Julie emerges from the shadows to blow a kiss of farewell to the boat. Gardner is breath takingly beautiful, of course, but it's the love in her eyes that always blows me away. No one will ever argue that she was a great actress but this moment really works.

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