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I Just Watched...

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4 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

If I Had a Million (1932)

How long have you had that on your DVR?  I don't think TCM has run it in quite a few years.  :(

My favorite is the Wynne Gibson story.  She plays a prostitute working down by the docks who gets her million, and....  Well, I won't spoil the ending for those who haven't seen it.

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55 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

The Miracle Man (1932)

220px-TheMiracleMan1932Poster.jpg

Here's the only known footage from the 1919 silent version that made the world first take notice of Lon Chaney

 

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"A Rage To Live" - Walter Grauman - 1965 -

"Spoiler Alert" -

This daring-for-its' time drama is about a young woman, Grace (Suzanne Pleshette), who gradually realizes that she is a promiscuous young woman and finally tries to turn the tables and marry a nice young man, Sidney (Bradford Dillman).

But her tendencies return to the surface again when she encounters an acquaintance from her past, Roger (Ben Gazarra).

Roger is madly in love with her.

For Grace, it's a not-exactly wanted "roll in the hay".

Although she is forgiven by her husband, who knew "the sins of her past", she is eventually brought down by Jack (Peter Graves) and his jealous wife (Bethel Leslie) who sees an affair where there is none.

She accuses Grace of the affair with Jack at a party, and while there is no truth to the accusation, Sidney decides that he must walk out on Grace.

He just doesn't trust her anymore.

The film is nicely realized by Walter Grauman.

And it is well-performed by its' large cast.

But the film seems somewhat "tepid".

There's a tendency to enact the somewhat sordid material with a great deal of "taste".

If a film can be accused of erring on the side of "taste", "A Rage To Live" is the one.

It has none of the heat in the Claire Bloom, George Cukor-directed segment in "The Chapman Report".

MV5BZTgzZDE0N2MtMmM2NC00MDBmLTlmZjktYmM4

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Payment Deferred (1932) - Crime drama from MGM and director Lothar Mendes. English Bank teller William Marble (Charles Laughton) has serious money problems, and if a solution doesn't present itself soon, he, as well as his wife Annie (Dorothy Peterson) and daughter Winnie (Maureen O'Sullivan), will be sent to the poor house. When a relative shows up on their doorstep, he may just provide the help they need. Either that, or William will have to take matters into his own hand. Also featuring Verree Teasdale, Billy Bevan, Halliwell Hobbes, Ethel Griffies, c> Montague Shaw, and Ray Milland.

This is pretty dark stuff for the time, and it exams the psychological cost of its characters' actions. The performances from all three leads are good, and Peterson's underplaying helps balance out Laughton's occasional overreach.    (7/10)

Source: TCM

payment.jpg

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TOOTSIE (1982) Score: 3.5/5

Starring: Dustin Hoffman, Teri Garr, Jessica Lange, Bill Murray, Dabney Coleman (hypocritical bigot). 

I've seen this film before, but just bought it on Google Play and was in the mood to re-watch it. I don't know what it is, but I enjoy the overall aesthetic of 80's films for some reason. I don't quite know how to describe it... Anyway, it's always a fun time watching this. 

Image result for tootsie 1982

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11 hours ago, NickAndNora34 said:

TOOTSIE (1982) Score: 3.5/5

Starring: Dustin Hoffman, Teri Garr, Jessica Lange, Bill Murray, Dabney Coleman (hypocritical bigot). 

I've seen this film before, but just bought it on Google Play 

Ha!--See, I was right:
The reason Digital Movies flopped was that NOBODY EVER bought anything from Warner and the studios' big push for Ultraviolet.  

Those undiscerning enough to get a quick digital and not the disk didn't really care where they got it, and got their movies from whatever service happened to be built into their device--Those with Androids got GooglePlay, those with iPads/Phones got iTunes, and those with Alexas got Amazon Video.  Problem is, every one of those services wanted to be their own sovereignty and NOT play along with Ultraviolet's new network, while Warner kept trying to push their UV-app Flixster with every free disk-code download.  And then, when customers wondered why the "free movie" they got with their disk wasn't on Google, Amazon or iTunes, but was on the crappy non-intuitive app that didn't work, they went back to where they were used to buying movies.

And the final indignity, Disney, which was also holding out its own service, rounded up the lone Google, Amazon and iTunes for its own network, and they're now still standing while Ultraviolet has been dead for over a year now.  Not that I harbor any lingering hostilities toward it, mind.  

11 hours ago, NickAndNora34 said:

and was in the mood to re-watch it. I don't know what it is, but I enjoy the overall aesthetic of 80's films for some reason. I don't quite know how to describe it... Anyway, it's always a fun time watching this. 

It's one of the few comedies to make it onto the AFI100 list--probably one of the few 80's comedies to get up there--and I wouldn't argue that.  You can talk about other iconic 80's comedies like Arthur, Ghostbusters, Police Academy 1, etc., but Sydney Pollack's direction on Tootsie actually feels like an old-school 30's/40's screwball comedy.  (More so than Peter Bogdanovich's intentional attempts, eg. "What's Up Doc?")  You find yourself trying to guess who'd play George Gaynes' dim lovestruck fool in the 30's version.

We get loads of loaded wishful social online analysis tacked onto the movie as "Tolerant pro-gay statement" on "Hoffman learning to appreciate his feminine side"--the Criterion set is probably slopping over with it--but truth is, by the time we get the chaotic soap-opera climax, we feel like we're watching Preston Sturges directing Cary Grant in "I Was a Male War Bride".

(I was going to go into a whole "What Made 80's Movies '80's Movies'?" analysis sub-essay in an IJW piece on having just seen the not-too-bad "Jumanji" reboot, but didn't think it would fit in after all of Lawrence's pre-codes.  😯 )

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I enjoyed My Gal Sal quite a bit. TCM is beginning to show more of the Fox musicals. There's a distinctive look with somewhat muted colors (but lots of them), as the Technicolor people preferred. I'm always in favor of musicals with a lot of musical numbers; the cinematography and sets were excellent; and so were the costumes, some of them delightfully over the top, especially some of Rita's hats. Rita Hayworth and Victor Mature don't sing, but their dubbers do a good job. Neither is exactly a great actor, but they are more than adequate for their roles here. Rita is beautiful, of course, and Victor gets a shirtless scene. Carole Landis, in a supporting role, is maybe more sympathetic than Rita. 

The dynamic of the leading couple is curious. Rita isn't too sympathetic at first, then Victor becomes even less so. They can't stand each other, they don't treat each other well, so they must be in love. Fortunately, there's plenty in the film to distract us from this. James Gleason and Phil Silvers contribute to the fun.

 

 

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I Kiss Your Hand, Madame (1929)

Sophisticated German silent comedy-drama, most noteworthy to contemporary viewers for Marlene Dietrich's lead performance as a Parisian divorcee who is romanced by a Russian count, not realizing that he is working as a waiter in a polished Paris restaurant. When she finally finds out the news will dramatically impact their relationship.

This is a very polished production, with elegant sets beautifully photographed. A pre-Von Sternberg Dietrich, heavier than we are used to seeing, is still quite stunning in appearance. Before American audiences discovered her she was a popular actress in Germany. She acts coy in much of the film, as well as seductive, though her character is quite shallow.

As the waiter/count top billed Harry Liedtke is a suave, elegant presence, perfectly cast in his role. Effectively cast in support, as well, is Karoly Huszar as a corpulent suitor of Dietrich. He is primarily in the film as comic support. In one of the film's best scenes, however, when Dietrich confronts Liedtke at work in his restaurant and treats him shabbily, Kuszar gains our sympathy by having the decency to act embarrassed by her behaviour.

I had never heard of the leading man before but was intrigued enough by Liedtke's skilful performance to look him up. He was a popular performer in Germany during the silent era, earlier cast in heroic roles before eventually becoming a character actor after the talkies came in, as his voice was deemed less than suitable to the new medium.

Far more tragic for Liedtke, though, were the circumstances of his death. He and his wife were both killed by Red Army troops (a bottle smashed over his head) when they invaded his home in Brandenburg in 1945. According to IMDb Liedtke was killed when he tried to protect a woman taking refuge in his home, fleeing from being raped (Wikipedia says it was Liedtke's own wife he was trying to save).

There is a fine looking copy of I Kiss Your Hand Madame on rarefilmm.com under its German title Ich Kusse Ihre Hand Madame (with English sub titles).

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3 out of 4

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"God's Not Dead" (2014)  Shame a student can't have this very discussion in real life. :(:angry:

God's_Not_Dead.jpg

 

Afraid to be wrong.

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thelma_todd___babes_in_the_goods_full_re

Babes in the Goods - Thelma Todd and Patsy Kelly are ordered by their boss to stay late to demonstrate a dish washer and laundry washing machine "until the last person in the crowd leaves." The janitor accidentally locks them in and things keep going wrong. This one has a lot of funny gags and one character that sticks out is the drunk who keeps misinterpreting the actions in the window and perving on the girls who have stripped down to sleep. Overall I recommend this one. A good short with some funny gags. 

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College Swing:   Midnight this morning-------

The first time I saw(or even heard of) this one.  With a veritable "who's who" of early movie and radio comic actors, and full of (for me too) surprises.

Anyone who's paid the slightest attention to any of my posts knows that I've been in love with GRACIE ALLEN ever since I was old enough to sit up in front of the tube.  I've seen several of her and George's shorts and other film appearances over the years, but this one escaped me.  I knew she was great at the "zany" type comedy, but really had NO idea she could carry a tune that well!

Also, I'm not sure they did much "dubbing" singing in movies from that period, so I'll assume( until informed otherwise) that JOHN PAYNE did his own singing in this flick, another thing about him I was unaware of.

Most of the cast members were also many of my "favorites" over my lifetime, and too still hold that "honor"  ;)  So, NOW I gotta hunt down a DVD!  ;)

Sepiatone

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1 hour ago, Gershwin fan said:

thelma_todd___babes_in_the_goods_full_re

Babes in the Goods - Thelma Todd and Patsy Kelly are ordered by their boss to stay late to demonstrate a dish washer and laundry washing machine "until the last person in the crowd leaves." The janitor accidentally locks them in and things keep going wrong. This one has a lot of funny gags and one character that sticks out is the drunk who keeps misinterpreting the actions in the window and perving on the girls who have stripped down to sleep. Overall I recommend this one. A good short with some funny gags. 

The drunk in the short is played by Arthur Housman, who specialized in playing comic inebriates. And, you're right, he's very funny in this effort.

arthur_housman___babes_in_the_goods.jpg

By the way, all 21 of the shorts that Thelma Todd made with Patsy Kelly became available in an impressive DVD collection released a few months ago, The Complete Hal Roach Thelma Todd Patsy Kelly Comedy Collection. With the exception of just one short on the DVD, I thought the prints of these shorts looked fine. Babes in the Goods was one of my favourites of the 21. Three other shorts are also thrown into the collection when Hal Roach tried, unsuccessfully, to keep the comedy series going after Todd's death by teaming Patsy Kelly with Pert Kelton and then Lyda Roberti.

514y+YKkbqL._SY445_.jpg

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12 hours ago, rayban said:

"A Rage To Live" - Walter Grauman - 1965 -

"Spoiler Alert" -

This daring-for-its' time drama is about a young woman, Grace (Suzanne Pleshette), who gradually realizes that she is a promiscuous young woman and finally tries to turn the tables and marry a nice young man, Sidney (Bradford Dillman).

But her tendencies return to the surface again when she encounters an acquaintance from her past, Roger (Ben Gazarra).

Roger is madly in love with her.

For Grace, it's a not-exactly wanted "roll in the hay".

Although she is forgiven by her husband, who knew "the sins of her past", she is eventually brought down by Jack (Peter Graves) and his jealous wife (Bethel Leslie) who sees an affair where there is none.

She accuses Grace of the affair with Jack at a party, and while there is no truth to the accusation, Sidney decides that he must walk out on Grace.

He just doesn't trust her anymore.

The film is nicely realized by Walter Grauman.

And it is well-performed by its' large cast.

But the film seems somewhat "tepid".

There's a tendency to enact the somewhat sordid material with a great deal of "taste".

If a film can be accused of erring on the side of "taste", "A Rage To Live" is the one.

It has none of the heat in the Claire Bloom, George Cukor-directed segment in "The Chapman Report".

MV5BZTgzZDE0N2MtMmM2NC00MDBmLTlmZjktYmM4

 

It would have had more sizzle if it have been filmed in the 70s.

John O'Hara's 1949 novel is actually not much better, at least the film updates everything to the then present.

The novel quaintly takes place in the years surrounding WWI, so it's the end of the Queen Ann Era. Wayward husbands or husbands with frigid wives head to local bordellos, or the local rich bachelor's "hunting lodge" to party with imported talent.  The novel contains Gossipy biddies, "infantile paralysis" (polio), horseless carriages, and the assignations with Grace take place in them or in hotel rooms, etc.   

It may have been a racy novel in 1949 but now it should be re-titled A Rage To Bore.  :D

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For Any "Dark Shadows" TV soap fans check out Eye Of The Devil on TCM on demand it's on the list now. It's got a very Dark Shadowy vibe to it all but with extremely high production values. 

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19 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

If I Had a Million (1932) - Anthology from Paramount Pictures and directors Ernst Lubitsch, James Cruze, H. Bruce Humberstone, Lothar Mendes, Stephen Roberts, William A. Seiter, Norman Taurog, and Norman Z. McLeod. When ultra-wealthy John Glidden (Richard Bennett) is told that he's at death's door, he decides that, rather than leave his wealth to his scheming, money-hungry family, he'll randomly pick people out of the directory and give them each a check for one million dollars. The film then shows a series of vignettes, often comedic but occasionally serious, of how each person reacts to their unexpected financial windfall. Featuring Gary Cooper, Charles Laughton, W.C. Fields, Alison Skipworth, May Robson, Gene Raymond, Jack Oakie, George Raft, Charles Ruggles, Mary Boland, Roscoe Karns, Berton Churchill, Joyce Compton, Frances Dee, Blanche Friderici, Wynne Gibson, Samuel S. Hinds, Lucien Littlefield, Grant Mitchell, Clarence Muse, and Marc Lawrence & Gail Patrick in their film debuts.

This entertaining movie is all over the place both in tone and in quality. A silly bit with Fields and Skipworth on a mission to crash cars across the city will be followed by Gene Raymond as a man on death row pleading for his life. Some are just one-joke gags (the Laughton sequence), while others have some emotional heft (May Robson in a home for elderly women). My personal favorite features George Raft as a crook who is too afraid he'll get arrested if he tries to cash his check. According to the IMDb trivia, there were additional scenes that were cut that included Cary Grant, Miriam Hopkins, Tallulah Bankhead, Sylvia Sidney, Carole Lombard, Randolph Scott, and Fredric March.   (7/10)

Source: TCM

220px-If_I_Had_a_Million_poster.jpg

 

I haven't seen this in quite some time, but I do remember the little brat playing a record, "I'll be glad when you're dead, you rascal you". 

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Baby Face (1933). This sexually-charged pre-code features Barbara Stanwyck in one of her best early roles.  We’re introduced to her as Lily Powers, a poor unhappy girl slaving away at her father’s bawdily depressing speakeasy, where she must fend off troglodyte males.  She hates her brutal father, who pimped her out as a young girl. His death in a fire accident for Lily is liberation. The only person Lily trusts, and cares for, is her African-American maid (Theresa Harris). You can take the lesbian subtext, or you can leave it.  A bombastic shoe cobbler (with a forceful rhetoric and cadence not unlike Hitler), aptly named Adolf Cragg, assumes a Svengali-like role, telling Lily to read Nietzsche, and weaponize her body to rise to the top.  Lily follows his advice in spades.  For there its one sexual conquest after another, first a railroad worker, followed by a string of bank executives.

Lily exerts a vice-grip over men, in effect becoming a vampire.  Stanwyck’s cold eroticism, that laser-like come-hither stare will come full circle 11 years later in Double Indemnity.  Baby Face has murder, suicide, high finance (sort of) and Haute couture, as Lily’s wardrobe, and houses, improve with each rung of the economic ladder she climbs. The third act is the weakest, as Baby Face settles into a cozy, neatly wrapped melodrama. The film can be read as feminist manifesto, a #MeToo clarion call.  It’s a portrait of a long-suffering woman turning the tables on the patriarchy, the only practical way she knew how. With George Brent as a wily bank president, and Lily's genuine love interest.  Look for John Wayne in an unmemorable bit role.   The other performances that stood out are Alphonse Ethier as the aforementioned Adolf Cragg, and a tortured Donald Cook as Ned Stevens, one of several men who meet their downfall in Lily.

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1 hour ago, cigarjoe said:

 

It would have had more sizzle if it have been filmed in the 70s.

John O'Hara's 1949 novel is actually not much better, at least the film updates everything to the then present.

The novel quaintly takes place in the years surrounding WWI, so it's the end of the Queen Ann Era. Wayward husbands or husbands with frigid wives head to local bordellos, or the local rich bachelor's "hunting lodge" to party with imported talent.  The novel contains Gossipy biddies, "infantile paralysis" (polio), horseless carriages, and the assignations with Grace take place in them or in hotel rooms, etc.   

It may have been a racy novel in 1949 but now it should be re-titled A Rage To Bore.  :D

Queen Anne? I've always wanted to see this film for a laugh. I vaguely remember the ads for it....

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7 minutes ago, Hibi said:

Queen Anne?

I'm thinking in terms or architecture. The turn of the last century Queen Anne-style architecture was popular from roughly 1880 to 1910. The novel not the film. :D The characters in novel dressed "Edwardian" as below.

Image result for 1910 clothing

Image result for 1910 clothing

 

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"Fantastic Voyage" (1966) on the FXM channel.  Been a long time since I've seen it, unedited and in 2.35 widescreen.

 

Special effects is great but some stuff is showing advance age.  It has a lot of problems....wallpaper of cells, each suppose to be ALIVE. Miniaturization needed to be explained better because if atoms are shrunk, one couldn't use the surrounding air - their atoms would be MUCH larger, blood cells are translucent, antibodies don't react that fast to a foreign invader especially if it's new and not recognized.  White blood cells don't eat metal so why didn't the Proteus deminiaturized turning the movie into a horror film because it be bursting from the scientist head! :o

Fantastic+Voyage_7b.jpg

 

A remake is being filmed. Should be interesting.

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6 minutes ago, cigarjoe said:

I'm thinking in terms or architecture. The turn of the last century Queen Anne-style architecture was popular from roughly 1880 to 1910. The novel not the film. :D The characters in novel dressed "Edwardian" as below.

Image result for 1910 clothing

Image result for 1910 clothing

 

Oh, ok.

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Shopworn (1932) - Melodrama from Columbia Pictures and director Nick Grinde. Barbara Stanwyck stars as Kitty Lane, a waitress in a diner who meets and falls in love with David Livingston (Regis Toomey), the only child of wealthy widow Mrs. Livingston (Clara Blandick). David's mother is mortified that her son would be carousing with such a low-born person, and she sets out to see their relationship ended. Also featuring Zasu Pitts, Lucien Littlefield, LeRoy Mason, Joe Sawyer, Maude Turner Gordon, Albert Conti, and Oscar Apfel.

From what I've read, this movie has been repeatedly compromised, first upon initial release, with some footage trimmed for censor's sake, and then again in 1938 when the movie was re-released during the strict days of the Hays Code's full enforcement. The movie does seem a bit choppy, particularly in the second half, but it's still largely intelligible. Stanwyck is good in one of her patented "survivor" roles, and I always appreciate the presence of the one-of-a-kind Zasu Pitts. Toomey seems like an unlikely leading man, though.   (6/10)

Source: TCM

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Sky Devils (1932) - Weak aviation comedy from United Artists, producer Howard Hughes, and director A. Edward Sutherland. Fast-talking hustler Wilkie (Spencer Tracy) and his dim-bulb pal Mitchell (George Cooper) find themselves in and out trouble, eventually landing in flight school in the Army Air Corps. They battle with Drill Sgt. Hogan (William "Stage" Boyd), and Wilkie falls for showgirl Mary (Ann Dvorak). Also featuring Billy Bevan, Yola d'Avril. Forrester Harvey, William B. Davidson, Jerry Miley, and Walter Catlett.

The best thing about this bad timewaster is the aerial footage, including a lot of dangerous air stunts. The comedy isn't even smirk-worthy, though, and Tracy is reworking well-worn territory. Dvorak is cute, but her character is paper-thin.   (5/10)

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7 hours ago, Hibi said:

Queen Anne? I've always wanted to see this film for a laugh. I vaguely remember the ads for it....

Suzanne Pleshette could have given us a racier version, but the script and the direction hold everything carefully "in check".

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9 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

For Any "Dark Shadows" TV soap fans check out Eye Of The Devil on TCM on demand it's on the list now. It's got a very Dark Shadowy vibe to it all but with extremely high production values. 

"Eye of the Devil" needs to be - re-discovered.

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Strangers in Love (1932) - Comedy from Paramount Pictures and director Lothar Mendes. Buddy Drake (Fredric March) is a former soldier and adventurer who, along with buddy Stan (Stuart Erwin), is down on his luck, so he goes to see his twin brother Arthur (also March). When Arthur drops dead, Buddy decides to assume his identity, little knowing the shady shenanigans that Arthur had been up to. In fact, Arthur's secretary Diana (Kay Francis) has secretly been hoping to find enough evidence to expose Arthur as a crook who cheated her father (George Barbier) out of his fortune. Also featuring Sidney Toler, Juliette Compton, Earle Fox, Gertrude Howard, Leslie Palmer, and Lucien Littlefield.

This barely-over-an-hour trifle is fun, quick, and breezy. March has a ball with his dual roles, and he shows off his acting skill with the many vocal and gesture differences between the two brothers. Francis is engaging and beautiful, and future Charlie Chan Sidney Toler is amusing as a private detective.   (7/10)

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