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I Just Watched...

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4 minutes ago, scsu1975 said:

James Karen used to advertise on television for the Pathmark supermarket chain. I never knew the guy was an actor until I saw this film. He is absolutely hysterical in it.

You never saw Frankenstein Meets the Space Monster, aka Mars Invades Puerto Rico? Cinema gold.

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Just now, LawrenceA said:

You never saw Frankenstein Meets the Space Monster, aka Mars Invades Puerto Rico? Cinema gold.

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No, but I've heard of it. It's on my list of the one million movies I need to see before I croak.

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maybe it's the fact that every zombie apocalypse movie needs a de facto jerk that i dismissed Clu's work...although it would've been more fun with SAM WATERSON in the part (I think.)

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1 hour ago, scsu1975 said:

Don Calfa.

James Karen used to advertise on television for the Pathmark supermarket chain. I never knew the guy was an actor until I saw this film. He is absolutely hysterical in it.

JAMES KAREN also shows up as an interviewee in the occasional classic film documentary or biography- I'm not entirely sure why, but he usually has something interesting to say, so i allow it (ie, his father referred to Greta Garbo movies as "GRETA GARBAGE MOVIES.")

He was also in BEING FROM ANOTHER PLANET and was one of DOROTHY ZBORNAK'S suitors on THE GOLDEN GIRLS, so he knew all about dealing with various undead horrors.

(I kid!)

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James Karen was also the shady real estate agent responsible for all the trouble in Poltergeist. I didn't pay attention to him the first time I saw it, but after seeing him in ROTLD, whenever I see him in Poltergeist it cracks me up.

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Phantasm III: Lord of the Dead (1994) - More horror from writer-director Don Coscarelli. Emerging from a coma after the events of the last film, Mike (A. Michael Baldwin) reunites with pal Reggie (Reggie Bannister), but only briefly, as he's whisked off to another dimension by the sinister Tall Man (Angus Scrimm). Reggie then sets out to try and find and rescue Mike, aided by 11-year-old orphan Tim (Kevin Connors), and ex-soldier Rocky (Gloria Lynne Henry). Also featuring Bill Thornbury, Cindy Ambuehl, Brooks Gardner, and John Davis Chandler.

Universal ordered another sequel despite the poor box office of part 2, and while Coscarelli was given greater creative control (he was allowed to bring Baldwin back from the first film as Mike), the budget was smaller. Unfortunately there's not much inspiration to the proceedings this time around. A lengthy segment featuring new kid Connors battling criminals in his home comes across as a dumb, R-rated take-off on Home Alone. The mythology of the storyline is expanded a big, with names given to the flying spheres (Sentinels) and hooded dwarf servants (Lurkers), as well as completely explaining the Tall Man's purposes and use of the corpses he harvests. Some revelations about Mike, as well as his brother Jody (a returning Bill Thornbury), will come as a surprise. The movie was completed in 1993, but Universal kept it on the shelf for over a year, finally opening it in a couple of theaters in 1994 before eventually dumping it virtually direct-to-video in 1995. I've seen the previous two movies numerous times, but this one I had only seen once, back when it premiered on video, and I recalled nothing about it. I have not yet seen the remaining two films in the series.  (5/10)

Source: Anchor Bay DVD

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2 hours ago, scsu1975 said:

James Karen used to advertise on television for the Pathmark supermarket chain. I never knew the guy was an actor until I saw this film.

When I was a kid, I'd see E.G. Marshall in commercials for Albany Savings Bank.  I didn't know until much later that he was an accomplished actor.

Albany Savings Bank was bought out by Norstar, which was bought out by Fleet, which was bought out by TD.  I think.  I might have missed a few mergers in there.  My dad still has a Norstar bank bag; at least I saw it a few weeks ago.

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Cracker Tonk (1941)*.

Candy (Clark Gable) and Sniper (Chill Wills) are about to get tarred and feathered and ridden out of yet another old west town on a rail, but Candy talks his way out of it.  (Why the idiot townsfolk let him do it is beyond me.)  On the train to the next town, Candy meets Elizabeth (Lana Turner), daughter of the local JP (Frank Morgan).  It turns out the JP is a fellow con artist, now taking kickbacks.  He wants better for his daughter, so when Candy falls for her, he's not happy.  Of course Elizabeth tricks Candy into marrying her.

Candy proceeds to take the town over, although it causes friction between him and his father-in-law.  There's also the new sheriff (Albert Dekker) who's on the take but wants more, and the good government people led by the widow of the preacher (Marjorie Main).

It's all well-made, but it feels like I've seen these plot lines in a mish-mash of a bunch of MGM movies.  Still, it's solid entertainment.

6/10.

*Title changed because Otto Censor won't let me use the original title which begins with an H-word rhyming with "donkey".

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1 minute ago, Fedya said:

**** Tonk (1941).

 

Ah yes, Four Star Tonk, one of my favorite films ...

The censoring is really getting ridiculous.

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2 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

RETURN OF THE LIVING DEAD (1985) showed up on amazon prime, at last.

it really is an exquisite piece of trash, although i found it much more disturbing and unsettling in my old age and in the current world climate than I did as a 13 year old crouched five inches away in front of Cinemax on a summer night in 1990.

i

Did you notice that the owner of the medical supply warehouse and the mortician at the crematorium who are friends happen to be named Burt and Ernie? A coincidence or not?

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6 minutes ago, scsu1975 said:

Ah yes, Four Star Tonk, one of my favorite films ...

Hence why I edited my post....

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Phantasm IV: Oblivion (1998) - Another entry in the horror series, from writer-director Don Coscarelli. As Reggie (Reggie Bannister) searches for the missing Mike (A. Michael Baldwin), Mike himself travels through various dimensions and across time itself to learn the origins of the Tall Man (Angus Scrimm) in hopes of discovering a way to stop him once and for all.  Also featuring Bill Thornbury, Heidi Marnhout, and Bob Ivy.

The series attempts to return to its roots a bit, dropping most of the humor from the last two entries, and trying for the off-kilter dream-state of the first film. The film is helped a great deal by use of a lot of footage that was filmed for the original back in '79 but that was edited out, so we get several scenes of the characters as they were back then. The origin of the Tall Man is finally established (somewhat), and that will either be a good thing or a frustrating thing for fans of the series. The sections focusing on Reggie tread much of the usual territory, and there are a couple of over the top gags that will delight or disgust. The ending this time is even more ambiguous than usual. The next (and final?) sequel arrived 18 years later.    (6/10)

Source: Anchor Bay DVD

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The Crime of Doctor Crespi (1935) - Minor horror/thriller from Liberty Pictures and writer-director John H. Auer. Dr. Crespi (Erich von Stroheim) is a renowned surgeon with an elite clientele. When his rival Dr. Ross is severely injured in a car crash, Ross' wife Estelle (Harriet Russell) begs Crespi for his help. Crespi had dated Estelle before she left him for Ross, but the doctor agrees to help, when in fact he has a devious plan for revenge. Only fellow doctor Thomas (Dwight Frye) suspects something is amiss. Also featuring Paul Guilfoyle, John Bohn, Geraldine Kay, Patsy Berlin, Jean Brooks, and Joe Verdi.

You can guess where this one is headed as soon as the opening credits, since it states that it was "suggested by Edgar Allan Poe's The Premature Burial". Frye and von Stroheim vie to see who can turn in the hammiest performance. I'd call it a draw. I enjoyed Crespi's office decor, which includes an infant's skeleton atop the good doctor's liquor cabinet.  (5/10)

Source: YouTube

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"Flying Down To Rio" - Thornton Freeland - 1933 - music by Vincent Youmans, Edward Elison, Gus Kahn and Max Steiner - screenplay by Erwin S. Gelsey, H.W. Hanemann and Cyril Hume, dances by Dave Gould and Hermes Pan -

what can you say that hasn't already been said? - still, after 85 years, one of the screen's most glorious musicals - it's a seamless combination of story, music and dance -

it floats, actually floats -

it starred two of the screen's most beautiful people - Dolores Del Rio and Gene Raymond -

and brought us for the first time the screen's most memorable dancing couple - Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers -

dancing, of course, "The Carioca" -

this film will never grow old -

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The Mad Doctor (1940) - Suspense thriller from Paramount Pictures and director Tim Whelan. Psychiatrist Dr. George Sebastian (Basil Rathbone) has a habit of marrying wealthy women, using his medical know-how to manipulate and seduce them, and then having his accomplice Maurice (Martin Kosleck) murder the unlucky ladies. The doctor runs into trouble when he actually falls in love with his latest target, Linda (Ellen Drew). Also featuring John Howard, Ralph Morgan, Barbara Jo Allen, Kitty Kelly, Hugh O'Connell, and Hugh Sothern. 

Rathbone gives one of his better performances, particularly during a lengthy scene on a balcony with Drew as he recounts some of his past. The film's final act is well-done, ratcheting up the suspense as pursuers become pursued.    (7/10)

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5 hours ago, calvinnme said:

Did you notice that the owner of the medical supply warehouse and the mortician at the crematorium who are friends happen to be named Burt and Ernie? A coincidence or not?

I did notice. 

According to the film’s EXTENSIVE trivia section on IMDb, the Director said on the Blu Ray commentary that it WAS, in fact, a coincidence!

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Horror Island (1941) - "Old Dark House" mystery from Universal and director George Waggner. Hard-luck boat captain Bill Martin (Dick Foran) inherits a small private island and the abandoned castle on it, so he decides to charge folks to be ferried to his "haunted castle". He's also approached by a peg-legged sailor named Tobias Clump (Leo Carrillo) who claims to have a map to hidden treasure on the island. When Bill arrives with his first shipload of people, a mysterious "phantom" begins killing the guests. Also featuring Peggy Moran, Fuzzy Knight, Ralf Harolde, Hobart Cavanaugh, John Eldredge, Lewis Howard, Iris Adrian, and Walter Catlett.

This is far from original, but despite its shortcomings, I enjoyed it. It has the comic "spooky" atmosphere one expects from such things, and the performances are all good. Reportedly it was only 25 days between when filming began on this and when it premiered in theaters!   (7/10)

Source: YouTube

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Man Made Monster (1941) - Science fiction/horror from Universal and director George Waggner. Carnival performer Dan McCormick (Lon Chaney Jr.) seems to have an immunity to electrical charges, so he seems to be the perfect subject for the scientific experiments of Dr. Lawrence (Samuel S. Hinds) and Dr. Rigas (Lionel Atwill). However, Rigas takes things too far, and Dan is left a mind-addled killer with a deadly electrical touch. Also featuring Anne Nagel, Frank Albertson, William B. Davidson, Ben Taggart, Constance Bergen, Chester Gan, and Byron Foulger as "2nd Alienist".

This is a fun, entertaining hour of "fright". Chaney is sympathetic as the glowing monster, and Atwill is appropriately menacing as the mad scientist. The studio's satisfaction with how this movie turned out led to director Waggner and star Chaney being assigned The Wolf Man.    (7/10)

Source: YouTube

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I watched episode one of Last Man Standing on their new Fox network. It was fun with a profound message as well. I am not sure if our friends in Canada can see it, but there is an interesting twist included.

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Pauline at the Beach - This film should be called Marion as the movie is more about her. It chronicles many talkative 20 somethings as they envy each other and all suspect each other of sleeping with others. This is a good film about jealousy and has the high quality dialogue Rohmer is known for. I recommend it. 

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12 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

The Mad Doctor (1940)

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Rathbone's final moment in The Mad Doctor is quite memorable.

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11 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Horror Island (1941) - "Old Dark House" mystery from Universal and director George Waggner. Hard-luck boat captain Bill Martin (Dick Foran) inherits a small private island and the abandoned castle on it, so he decides to charge folks to be ferried to his "haunted castle". He's also approached by a peg-legged sailor named Tobias Clump (Leo Carrillo) who claims to have a map to hidden treasure on the island. When Bill arrives with his first shipload of people, a mysterious "phantom" begins killing the guests. Also featuring Peggy Moran, Fuzzy Knight, Ralf Harolde, Hobart Cavanaugh, John Eldredge, Lewis Howard, Iris Adrian, and Walter Catlett.

This is far from original, but despite its shortcomings, I enjoyed it. It has the comic "spooky" atmosphere one expects from such things, and the performances are all good. Reportedly it was only 25 days between when filming began on this and when it premiered in theaters!   (7/10)

Source: YouTube

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I was disappointed by this one, and it's a film I really wanted to like. For me it had a sentimental reunion of Dick Foran and Peggy Moran from The Mummy's Hand, one of my favourite Universal Bs. But there's way too much light hearted jokiness in this one, especially considering the film's title. Still worth seeing as a harmless time waster, though. This is the kind of film in which your mood while watching it will determine how forgiving you are of the film's script flaws.

I will concede one thing: I was genuinely surprised by the identity of the mystery killer.

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On 10/5/2018 at 11:03 AM, hamradio said:

"Fantastic Voyage" (1966) on the FXM channel.  Been a long time since I've seen it, unedited and in 2.35 widescreen.

 

Special effects is great but some stuff is showing advance age.  It has a lot of problems....wallpaper of cells, each suppose to be ALIVE. Miniaturization needed to be explained better because if atoms are shrunk, one couldn't use the surrounding air - their atoms would be MUCH larger, blood cells are translucent, antibodies don't react that fast to a foreign invader especially if it's new and not recognized.  White blood cells don't eat metal so why didn't the Proteus deminiaturized turning the movie into a horror film because it be bursting from the scientist head! :o

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A remake is being filmed. Should be interesting.

Fantastic Voyage always makes me think of those films they used to show in school about the effects of LSD.

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Watched The Big Sleep (1978) with Robert Mitchum.  Purchased the DVD several years ago and found it wanting in comparison to Bogie's version.  However, read a couple of posts on here about it being good, so gave it another shot.  Actually it is better than I thought.  Not as good as Mitchum's Farewell My Lovely from the same period, but still good.

Earlier I probably compared it to closely to Bogie's.  Hard not to do, but considering by itself, it flows well and the English setting is acceptable.  Also an opportunity to see several quality English actors.

Of course, as with FML, the lack of censorship adds another element that better explains the plot.

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15 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

The Mad Doctor (1940) - Suspense thriller from Paramount Pictures and director Tim Whelan. Psychiatrist Dr. George Sebastian (Basil Rathbone) has a habit of marrying wealthy women, using his medical know-how to manipulate and seduce them, and then having his accomplice Maurice (Martin Kosleck) murder the unlucky ladies. The doctor runs into trouble when he actually falls in love with his latest target, Linda (Ellen Drew).

Ellen Drew probably doesn't appear on too many lists of famous Hollywood Starlets, but she should. She was a very beautiful woman, with stunning eyes. TCM would do well to feature more of her films. Star of the Month perhaps?

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